National Gun Forum banner

1 - 20 of 49 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, we just got trap shooting as a sport at the high school and junior high. Both the older boys (by older I mean 11 and 12) wanted to join so I signed them up yesterday. Looks like I’ll have an opportunity to be an assistant coach and RSO so that’s a huge plus. The issue I have at the moment is choosing the right shotgun for them. Yeah, I could buy them a cheap single shot for around $100 but I’d rather spend a few bucks and buy them something a little nicer. I’ve had my eye on a Rem 870 for myself for sometime and with that in mind, I brought the oldest boy with me today to go shotgun shopping. We ran into a Remington 870 youth, which I still admire the build quality (in the $300 range) over Mossberg and Winchester models they had. Everything just feels tighter.

On to the dilemma... should I buy them a pump action for trap or should I go with an over/under? For another $100 each I can pick up a Stoeger O/U, don’t have a lot of knowledge about those shotguns, not one local to handle.

Had them both shoulder my VR 60 to see if they could shoulder and shoot a full size 12ga. Nic, no way. He can barely hold it up and stabilize it but could easily handle the semi auto recoil with lights target loads. Keep in mind this is a 9.7 lb shotgun empty.

Max can shoulder a full size but it’s a bit of a reach. He can’t grab my forward grip and shoulder it. Thinking maybe a youth for him as well would be best for maneuverability. Should I buy the youth and let him shoot a year or so and upgrade him later or should I buy him a full size now and just get him used to handling it so he is already got a year under his belt with the same gun next year? I don’t mind buying another one next year if it’s best for him. He’s about the size of my neighbors 15 year old in height, maybe 5’6”. I think I know the answer here just looking for opinions. I don’t want him to not do well because it’s a little much to maneuver. Some of you guys have been shooting full size 12 gauges since his age.

Last question has to do with recoil. Head coach says he prefers 12ga but will allow 20ga for younger shooters. They are in the youngest 2 age groups. They will be shooting 25 rds each practice. I can shoot 12ga all day long and not be sore but for 11and 12, should I go 20ga? Is it a disadvantage for them to go 20 vs 12? (I don’t have a 20ga to compare to). In addition, weather permitting, they’ll be shooting another 100rds each practicing at home.

Last note, head coach doesn’t care the style or action, just can’t have an external hammer. Bummer, i might have went a different route altogether.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
There are a few tactical shotguns that have AR style adjustable stocks. That’s another option. They are few and far between. I know I can get replacement buttstock for the Mossberg 88 that’s adjustable.
 

·
Genius in Training
Joined
·
486 Posts
I used an 870 and am very happy with my choice. Great gun for trap and now that I've graduated it can be a home defense gun or a hunting gun. My GF used a single shot and it is a pain when she goes hunting not having follow up shots. OU is a little better but not much.

I've never been bothered by 12ga, I think that is the standard for everyone. Even most junior shooters use them. 100lb young girls don't have too much issue with good technique so I doubt your boys would either. Especially a couple years from now when they are larger you won't have to worry about upgrading. After putting thousands of rounds through one gun making a change to a new one can be difficult to some people. If they are small enough that they can't reach on a full size and need a youth model, I guess you have to do what you have to do. Short barrels make shooting handicaps more difficult as they get into high school.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Philmo11

·
Jesus Saves
Joined
·
7,799 Posts
My very first firearm was for trapshooting, at 17y/o. I bought a Remington 1100 (semi), very nice monte carlo stock - the works.

I needed money one day.........that's the end of my trap shooting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,610 Posts
From a safety stand point the OU is a safer gun and most sporting clays and trap houses prefer to see them. The gun is completely safe when the action is open, AKA the gun is broke. There’s no hidden magazine to leave a round in and everyone can see its open.
I have two TriStar OU shotguns and they’re beautiful, 28ga and 410. The fit and finish of the wood and metal is much nicer than expected in that price range. $450-550. They really should be a consideration. I also have a Ruger Red Label in 20 ga. It’s a great gun by on the heavy side. They are no longer in production and have a $1400. Price tag. I would strongly recommend the TriStar. Look at their web site. They carry a 5 year full warranty. Remember that the Turks have been building guns for a hundred years. The only negative I have is that they don’t have a automatic safety. Some people t
like the auto safety’s and some don’t. I only like it for hunting because inexperienced shooters may forget to put their gun on safe after a animal flushes. It just requires discipline and training.
You may also want to require electronic muffs or plugs. These kids need to hear every command. I would reach out to the ammo manufacturers for help with ammo costs.
https://www.tristararms.com/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,610 Posts
Oh yeah, the 12 or 20? I shoot sporting clays with a 20. I have shot clays with the 12. I like the 20 better. Yes you have a smaller shot string. Yes it will require your shooters to be better shots. Is it a real handicap? Not really. 12 ga will give them a edge and they will toughen up to it. After 25 rounds a week for a few weeks they may not even feel it. They’ll be bruised up a bit at first and they’ll learn to mount it properly but it can be a bit rough for small shooters. Small women can Handel it so how bad can it be? Sorry I can’t be more helpful. Have them shoot a round with each. Stock dimensions and fit will help with recoil and accuracy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,900 Posts
I agree, i would either go with a semi like a remington or a O/U. If you go the (preferred) O/U route i would try to spend as much as you can to get something above a stoeger. From the Turkish made guns i have probably heard the most complaints from stoeger guns. Not saying you need a Browning but something like stamps mentioned above. Not sure what you have in your area for gun shops but i would look around for decent used guns. Sometimes you can get nice deals compared to new prices. I've seen some prices on some nice used 1100's that were so low it even made me want to buy them when i had zero use for it. Being they are 11 and 12 you will probably have to do some fitting depending on how big the kids are and the gun you buy...........While you're at it if you don't already you probably should buy yourself a trap gun too, LOL.
Oh and if you go the semi route spent $10 and get a shell catcher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,900 Posts
Oh and another gun you might able to find used that works really well is a older Rem 58. It's basically the predecessor to the 1100. I used one of these for many years and if kept clean they work very nice. Sometime you can find them fairly cheap BUT parts can be expensive. Mine has many thousands of round through it and has never seen a replacement part(except for the butt pad) unless someone did it before i got it back in 1980ish. Even the gas rings haven't been replaced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,206 Posts
Do NOT get a cheap O/U - you're better off with the 870 or a used 1100. Stoegers and other cheap O/Us are just not made for the volume associated with target shooting. Once they stop growing, start looking at used Browning or Beretta TARGET guns.

For now, the youth stock should be able to work for them.

Might want to pick up a reloader if you don't already have one. The gun is the cheapest part about shooting targets; even if it is a $12K Perazzi or Kreighoff. Ammo and target fees soon eclipse the cost of the gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I just put a Remington 870 Express 12ga 28” and a Remington 870 Express 20ga 26” on layaway. Both identical wood stocks. $640 for the pair. Figured the slightly shorter 20 ga will be a little lighter. If it’s still too much, I’ll pick up the youth 20ga or just buy a youth butt stock.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,206 Posts
Depending on what size your kids are, remember light equals more recoil. If they have to arch backward to get the stock in the shoulder, the gun isn't close to fitting and the recoil will be even harsher. Hopefully someone working with them knows something about fitting a gun.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Depending on what size your kids are, remember light equals more recoil. If they have to arch backward to get the stock in the shoulder, the gun isn't close to fitting and the recoil will be even harsher. Hopefully someone working with them knows something about fitting a gun.

Good luck!
I wont let them shoot something I don’t think they can handle well. It won’t hurt my feelings to go back and buy another if one of these is too big. Too big is not safe. The younger one is the one in concerned with. I’ll let him try the 20ga out back. I’m not terribly concerned with the recoil of the 20ga. He likes big guns. The one I bought is 3.5lbs lighter than the 12ga he tried yesterday. Recoil pad is about an inch thick on the back of the one I bought him. I found a AR style replacement grip and stock for the 870 for $150. I’ve got a seriously overkill butt pad if needed that will fit the milspec buffer tube.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,206 Posts
Check with the coaches; many clubs do not allow AR type stocks on the trap line for one reason or another.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Not the way I would have gone but it’s you kids and your choice.
O/Us are nice (and my preference) but they are having issue with the weight. An extra barrel hanging off the end is that much more weight on the end, especially at 26”-28”.

From a safety standpoint, they won’t chamber on their own like a semi auto, they are pump action. I bet if I look around, I’ve probably got chamber flags somewhere so they know it’s I unloaded
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,900 Posts
I get the weight aspect of a O/U for kids but where i go shoot there are quite a few kids who handle them quite well. A couple of them shoot dam well too!....To the point it's embarrassing for me to shot with them.

As far as semi's all the ones i have ever used stay open after you shoot. You only load one round, shoot and most places i shoot you are allowed to put the next round in the barrel or action but not close or chamber it until the last person shoots who shoots right before you. Then repeat 25 times.

Either way i bet your kids are going to love it, very rarely have i seen someone start shoot clays and not like it which is why i said you should get a gun too. It's like watching someone eat pizza and not getting a slice for yourself, lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,072 Posts
I always recommend a 12ga but at 11 & 12 y/o a 20ga recoil might be easier to handle at that age. It's hard to buy for kids because they outgrow what you bought for them yesterday. For trap and assuming they may expand into skeet or sporting clays you'll be better off with an auto or over/under. An auto loader will take a bit of the edge off the recoil. I never messed with recoil reducers but there are things you can install in the stock that may be a good idea for your kids. A good shooting vest that's padded couldn't hurt.

Do they each need their own gun? They can share one to try until they get comfortable and they have a better idea of what they like and what works for them. Any gun you get needs to fit them. You can cut the stock to fit. When they get older you can just replace the stock. A good recoil pad is a must. Back in the day Pachmayr was king but I'm sure since I got mine 40 years ago there are others just as good or better.

A 12ga pump is the most versatile gun around and I have one but would not recommend it for your application. I also have a Tristar G2 I got a left handed ver that's working okay for me and might be a good recommendation for you. They have youth models available. It's not a trap gun but the new Mossberg 940 JM pro Looks like a winner and I'll probably be getting one myself. If they move into 3 gun they'll be ready.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Philmo11

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yeah, they need their own. There are 2 fields so no telling if they’ll be together. I just wanted to give them the advantage of the longest barrel they can safely handle. Better for aim. We got the 28” 12ga and 26” 20ga, if one of them has a hard time handling one, I know where I can get a 21” 20ga youth 870 express.

You know now you have too many guns when you have an 28” 870 12ga in the safe and don’t realize it. Yes, I did that. In my defense, it’s not mine but it’s been here for 6 months. Max seems to handle it by still a little heavy for Nic. Hopefully the 20ga will be better. It’s 1.5lbs lighter and 2” shorter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
We have got several teams in the area and we require the kids to have their own shotguns. We provide safety instruction and work with their coaches on the level of coaching they want. Some coaches have no experience and others are quite capable.

When they have their own gun, they come back to practice on the weekends, and the eventually try sporting clays or five stand.

We do provide cleaning supplies and teach them to handle the guns safely with care. They’ve competed in the state tournament 3 times now and twice have sent kids to nationals...

Nice to see kids interested.

Great job helping out!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 49 Posts
Top