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Many people feel they are safe, insulated from life's accidents and tragedies. They grow up their whole life, around soft edges, and rounded corners. When they see something happen to somebody else, they tell themselves, "That couldn't possibly happen to me." .
Which is probably the same mindset which most people who have accidents like this, have. That must have really stung, when it happened.

Kind of makes me think of some of the stupid things I've done in the past,(not that this was outrageously stupid) which could have blown up, in my face.

So, yeah, very lucky.
 

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I think that pretty well defines "catastrophic failure".

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
After my kaboom with the 45 acp. Im extra careful loading. I look over my brass real close and keep a check on powder charges.
 
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Grand Imperial Poobah
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This is one reason I don't use other people's reloads.
 

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Keep calm & return fire!
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I saw this on another forum. Guy is truly blessed to be alive.

Many people feel they are safe, insulated from life's accidents and tragedies. They grow up their whole life, around soft edges, and rounded corners. When they see something happen to somebody else, they tell themselves, "That couldn't possibly happen to me." .
Which is probably the same mindset which most people who have accidents like this, have. That must have really stung, when it happened.
My Dad used to say something about things happening to "other people".
He would say to us..."Just remember, to other people, You're the other people".
 

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I saw this on another forum. Guy is truly blessed to be alive.


My Dad used to say something about things happening to "other people".
He would say to us..."Just remember, to other people, You're the other people".
That is true. Something most people, including me, find out the hard way.

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Well now i know where they saying "that's gonna leave a mark" came from.
 

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It's why I only use my Lyman scale to verify other scale measurements. Almost double-charged an entire box of 45ACP,
because, to be kind, the scale is, shall we say, less than exact.
 

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AZHerper
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It's why I only use my Lyman scale to verify other scale measurements. Almost double-charged an entire box of 45ACP,
because, to be kind, the scale is, shall we say, less than exact.
I suppose that this goes without saying but; verifying a "double charge" does not require any degree of scale accuracy.
 

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How could you miss detecting a "double-charged" .45 ACP case? There's not a lot of space there to begin with. And I'm speaking from 38 years of casting bullets and reloading for the .45 ACP.

A visual inspection of thrown powder charges in all straight-wall handgun cases is an "absolute requirement" for me.
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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How could you miss detecting a "double-charged" .45 ACP case? There's not a lot of space there to begin with. And I'm speaking from 38 years of casting bullets and reloading for the .45 ACP.

A visual inspection of thrown powder charges in all straight-wall handgun cases is an "absolute requirement" for me.
I think in @Coalcracker ‘s case, he was using 4.5gr of TiteGroup. This is 4.5gr next to 9.0gr. Wouldn’t be hard to do.

123260
 

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I've run tite group in 45 auto, and they shot well for me actually. But that's scary. From Philmo's picture, I almost don't think my powder cop would look any different with that double charge. Think I'll stick to Unique with my progressive for now, tite group with my single stage so I have to physically handle each charge. I like my fingers.

Also, I never thought about how much more intense a mishap would be in something like a .50 BMG. Guess there's a lot of unused space in the case, or was the wrong powder used?
 

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I have a very good friend that used to store his powder by manufacturer. He now stores it by handgun and rifle.
He was loading some .223 Rem for a day of target shooting with some other friends. His chosen rifle for the day was a Savage model 11 righthand action with a HB. The powder was to be CFE223. But he mistakenly grabbed CFE PISTOL instead. The first shot was predictable.....
The only thing that survived was the action and barrel. Bolt, stock and a $1000 scope were lost. A guy 6 feet away got splinters in his leg. Luckily, neither were seriously injured.
It does not take a big bore to cause catastrophic failure. He is right handed. If his friend that is left handed was the one shooting, the personal damage would have been much worse.

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I think in @Coalcracker ‘s case, he was using 4.5gr of TiteGroup. This is 4.5gr next to 9.0gr. Wouldn’t be hard to do.

View attachment 123260
This is another reasons why I don't use the "fast" "shotgun" powders in handgun cases. Even though Hodgdon says that it's suitable for handguns; if a double charge would fit in a case, I wouldn't use it. Maybe I'm just extra cautious but that's just me. Also, I started loading decades ago when powder was real cheap so I didn't worry about economy or how many loads I could get out of a pound of powder. Also, I was loading lot's of big cases like 45-70 and .458 Win magnum so I was used to throwing big powder charges.
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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It does not take a big bore to cause catastrophic failure.
You are absolutely right, it doesn’t take a big bore. I was simply demonstrating how a low charge powder can, even if you’re visually checking them, for the most part disappear in a fat case and make it difficult to identify just at a glance. Glad to hear your friend was ok.
 

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I absolutely agree. I use some powders that would be very easy to overcharge a case. Every 50 cases, I stop to visually check each case. If the charge looks off at all, either over or under the others, I will weigh them again. I am very anal about it. Even rifle cases. I have a small flashlight that lives on my reloading bench just for that. To anyone I teach to reload, I stress it. Over and over.
I stack primed cases on the left, charge ONE at a time and it goes in a tray on the right side of the bench. I'll generally check at least 1-2 powder drops out of every 10. When a tray is full, I do a visual check and verify any that look at all off.
I have seen the results of a few times folks have skipped that step. They get over confident and complacent. And pay the price. I don't intend to be one of them.
I also store pistol and rifle components separately. Just to make sure I don't mix them up.
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