National Gun Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I haven't really bought any ammo besides a few rounds 5 years ago that never got used so I'm not really down at all. I put the order in for my new fn 15 competition yesterday and I got delayed on the 10/22 but I'm wondering is it worth dropping 4 or 5 grand on auto ammo reloaded? I was looking at the markvii in particular just wondering if it'd be more cost effective to make your own cartridges in the long run? I've googled it but I've seen mixed answers a lot of sites are saying store bought can be just as good or better but I'm wondering if that's the guys trying to sell the ammo.
 

·
Aim true !
Joined
·
10,266 Posts
I reload. It's very enjoyable. And you don't need a 4000.00 machine lol. I have 4 press's, And dies for around 15 calibers off the the top of my head. And don't have 4 grand invested.
DSCF8181.JPG
 
  • Like
Reactions: QuickdrawMcgraw

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I just dont want to spend hours reloading ammo lol I wasn't sure if that was only one caliber or if its interchangeable for multiples? Do you know if it saves you money for does it cost more for diy?
 

·
Grand Imperial Poobah
Joined
·
22,269 Posts
If you count solely your expenses, reloading saves money in the long run for the routine shooter.

If you add your time to your expenses, reloading costs you money because you could make/save more by other pursues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Well that's why I wanted the automatic loader lol not super worried over the price tag if it'll eventually save me money and be able to use it for a few calibers that'd be solid in my book
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,345 Posts
How much you may save will depend on how much you shoot. If you're just making ammo and not shooting it, there is no savings, really, unless you're just stockpiling.

Do the math and figure out how many rounds you'll have to make in order to recover your initial investment in equipment. Just a rough estimate, my initial investment was only about $600 and it took me about 6,000 rounds to break even. Which is to say, I saved around $0.10 per round. As others have said, the value of my time was never added in, otherwise, no savings would ever be realized.

If you're going to get into an automated system, remember, you can't safely leave it running while you go elsewhere. You'll still have to attend to it, hands on, you'll just get many more rounds per hour.

There are other considerations to keep in mind as well, particularly with regard to quality of ammo and the performance of the ammo in your firearms.

--Wag--
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Attending the thing is fine I need something to do I have so much time doing nothing and stockpiling was definitely something I considered I'm wanting to build a safe room underground in the next couple years away from the main house to secretly store stuff. Not sure how fast I could go through 50k rounds but with a little help from some friends I'm sure it wouldnt be much issue idk to be honest though from what I've been reading seems pretty easy to blast through some rounds
 

·
Aim true !
Joined
·
10,266 Posts
On them days when it's raining out or to cold to shoot. You load. Them nights when you have a second wind and can't sleep you load. Hand loading is better than automated IMO. The quality of the loads will be better. You are there to catch anything that goes out of adjustment. Every so many rounds measure over all length. Check the powder drop weight. When your loading for precision. Your going to want to weigh each charge precisely. Reloading is almost as enjoyable as shooting. After you gain experience. You will find yourself customizing loads to match the individual guns.
 

·
Aim true !
Joined
·
10,266 Posts
No not if you have a powder drop. See the red thing on top of the press on the left in my pic? That is a powder hopper. It's attached to a powder dispenser. It drops the powder through a powder through die. I have seperate one too for loading rounds one at a time too. I drop the charge and weigh it in a pan. Then trickel the powder when i want a precise charge. But that's only when your trying to develop super accurate loads.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,150 Posts
Reloading is not for everyone and it may not be for you. This is why you shouldn't reload:

You haven't shot the ammo you have in five years.

You like shooting 22's.

You may not have the respect for how difficult and dangerous it can be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
I load with a single stage Hornady press and have for going on 30 years. I load .223, 30-06, .243 and .327 fed. all one round at a time. I don't load 9mm, 45 ACP cause I can buy it cheaper. I usually do batches of 50 in a three stage process.
1. De-cap and clean.
2. Size, Trim, and Prime.
3. Drop powder and press bullets.

I weigh every powder charge. What I load it used for hunting.

If you want speed, buy a Dillion RL550 or Hornady AP. These are progressive ammo plants.
 

·
Live Free
Joined
·
2,873 Posts
Do you have to sit there and weigh up each individual cartridges grain weight?
Not necessarily, but it really depends on what you are loading. If you are cranking out target loads for handguns, you can typically set up your powder measure to throw each charge once you have it adjusted. But you should still check it periodically. I verify what is throwing about every ten rounds for this sort of ammo. If you are loading maximum loads for rifles especially, but handguns too, you should be a little more careful as powder measures tend to vary slightly, and more so with some types of powders because of the shape of the powder grains. Additionally, if you are loading rifle ammo your best accuracy comes from careful powder measuring among other things. I get the impression that you really do not know much about reloading, so I would recommend doing some reading first to see what is involved. There are a variety of errors possible when reloading; some of which can result in injury or even death when the firearm is destroyed. I would never recommend anyone go into high volume reloading like you are describing until they learned the basics on a simple single stage or turret press. Of course, that is just my opinion.
 

·
Keep calm & return fire!
Joined
·
11,912 Posts
I bought a progressive press (Dillon 550) and all supplies about 3 years ago and everything is still in its boxes. I've never set it up. My take is unless you are loading a boutique caliper or shooting competitively it isn't worth it. I just bought 1000rds of CCI/Speer 115gr 9mm for $179 shipped. It would have taken 4-6 hours to reload that versus 60 seconds and a few mouse clicks.

Unless its a specialty caliper or you're shooting competitively and trying to squeeze every thousandths out for marksmanship (or you're retired and have the time to burn) I'd say its not worth it.
Your milage may vary.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,703 Posts
I went out and purchased a progressive set up seven years ago just in case things got bad again. I see nothing swaying me to reload unless I want the cartridge to preform s desired way. Or the cartridge is EXPENSIVE to purchase or extremely hard to find. With this said I'll be picking up a 30.06 and a 45-70 this year so I feel new dies will be purchased shortly after I get these rifles :)

Other then this for 500 rounds lets say 9mm is round 100 dollars depending on manufacture. One would need to include the time to make the 500 rounds and setting up the machine to make these cartridges preform like the manufacture build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
For me, the appeal of reloading is less about saving money, and more about having the ability to reuse casing and reproduce my own ammo if there is ever a shortage (or an apocalypse :thumbsup:).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,443 Posts
Do you have to sit there and weigh up each individual cartridges grain weight?
Powder measures are great and do quite well with spherical (ball) powders and can throw consistent charges within a .1 gn. But have a hard time with bar (stick) powders such as IMR 4350. I have both a Hornady and RBCS ( with a match meter). I still like to weigh each charge. I've been using the RBCS with CFE223 and it has been pretty consistant at throwing 26 gn. charges so weighing the charge is not adding that much time to the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
You don't sound like you shoot much so I would say no, it would be a waste of money. Reloading takes time and patience. Even with an automated system. It takes setup time, load development time, time on or at the press monitoring and refilling bullets, brass, powder and primers. Unless you shoot 1000 rounds or more a month or need custom loads, you'll never recoup your money. Plus without experience and with a hurry up attitude, you could get yourself or someone else hurt.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top