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Since the government will be crushing hundreds of ARs (because that's all they're going to get with their mandatory buyback program), they will be desirable and hard to find.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I recommend you watch the Gun Gripes Episode by Iraqveteran8888 titled: "Is gun confiscation realistic?" if you haven't already. He lays out some vary good points, too many to tell here, why gun confiscation in the United States is unrealistic and nearly impossible for the federal government to actually carry out.
 

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My favorite collector Military rifle is the Martini Henry and Martini cadet. I have about 15 Cadet's and 5 Henry's all but one of each have been stripped for sporting cartridge parts. The Cadet virgin, unaltered sells for about $1,500. Plus in excellent condition. The Henry's are available at IMA for $700. to $2,000 depending on condition. Those prices will never go down. But be sure to do your home work, lots of middle east junk and counterfeits out there.
 

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Already have, I got a Martini Henry from IMA! Awesome rifle, any other recommendations?
The Cadet is going to be a bit harder to snag. I see them occasionally on Gun Broker. There are a couple listed on broker currently: item #17118918 and #888447720. They are both in the same +/- same price range, and condition. The latter barrel and receiver serial numbers match. The receiver and wood serial numbers do not match. This is common with military guns over 100 years old. The add does not mention the bore condition. Bear in mind if any parts are missing from the innards those parts are difficult to finds and VERY expensive when found. I once paid $185. plus shipping for a stripped breech block. So be sure to ask lots of questions.
These are the easiest rifles in the world to set up for multi barrel sets. I made a .32/40 Win. with a .32Win Special for my DIL . Unscrew one barrel and screw in the alternate barrel chambered for your desired cartridge. The only fly in the buttermilk is the bore diameter of the Cadet .321-.323. The fable about a Cadet .310 -12-120 cartridge being the same as the .32/20 winch is incorrect. The .32/20 uses a .314 bullet.
Cadets are my all time favorite single shot rifle action. They are a strong as a bank vault and almost delicate. I have one chambered in the 4,000plus fps .17/.221 Fireball. It shoots better than I can. It is assembled from the parts box, I never butcher a piece of history.
Roy
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I had forgotten what that was until I looked up a picture and my memory snapped back, about a year ago I saw 2 of them at an Auction, but I didn't know what they where, and only later I did some research and I think I came to the conclusion that it was a "Missouri something."


The Cadet is going to be a bit harder to snag. I see them occasionally on Gun Broker. There are a couple listed on broker currently: item #17118918 and #888447720. They are both in the same +/- same price range, and condition. The latter barrel and receiver serial numbers match. The receiver and wood serial numbers do not match. This is common with military guns over 100 years old. The add does not mention the bore condition. Bear in mind if any parts are missing from the innards those parts are difficult to finds and VERY expensive when found. I once paid $185. plus shipping for a stripped breech block. So be sure to ask lots of questions.
These are the easiest rifles in the world to set up for multi barrel sets. I made a .32/40 Win. with a .32Win Special for my DIL . Unscrew one barrel and screw in the alternate barrel chambered for your desired cartridge. The only fly in the buttermilk is the bore diameter of the Cadet .321-.323. The fable about a Cadet .310 -12-120 cartridge being the same as the .32/20 winch is incorrect. The .32/20 uses a .314 bullet.
Cadets are my all time favorite single shot rifle action. They are a strong as a bank vault and almost delicate. I have one chambered in the 4,000plus fps .17/.221 Fireball. It shoots better than I can. It is assembled from the parts box, I never butcher a piece of history.
Roy
Is that Cadet in anyway connect to the Greene pattern civilian Marini's? It looks similar. I have a personal soft spot for single shot weapons as well. Shotguns in particular. These Cadets look like wonderful rifles though, you also seem to be extremely knowledgeable about cadets, now I know how much you love them lol
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Have not fired the Martini yet, as you probably know ammunition is... Well... Basically non existent. We have a friend though, that reloads .577, so maybe soon. This Martini from IMA was a true treasure, it was build in England, (I can't for the life of me remember what armory) used in the Queens guard, used in Central East Africa, South Africa, India, Nepal, been in a few wars, and been reactivated a few times. The story is almost better than the gun! Here's a photo of it. (I love photographing them, should I ever lose them) Update: forgot to mention, its a pattern A of which 22,000 where built.

120877
120878
 

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I had forgotten what that was until I looked up a picture and my memory snapped back, about a year ago I saw 2 of them at an Auction, but I didn't know what they where, and only later I did some research and I think I came to the conclusion that it was a "Missouri something."




Is that Cadet in anyway connect to the Greene pattern civilian Marini's? It looks similar. I have a personal soft spot for single shot weapons as well. Shotguns in particular. These Cadets look like wonderful rifles though, you also seem to be extremely knowledgeable about cadets, now I know how much you love them lol
Here is a quick history on the Martini Cadet: https://www.ssusa.org/articles/2018/7/26/310 There are several variations of the design for military use. An outfit named Sportco bought up lots of Australian Cadets shortly after WW II. By the way the Cadet was one of the issue weapons for the Australian Home guard during WW II. Sportco pulled the center fire .310 barrels, and installed .22 LR heavy target barrels, fitted them with target stocks, and peep sights, and adjustable triggers. I call mine the most boring rifle in the world. It hits the bulls eye while I am pouring my coffee at the range. Sportco was the brain child of Mr. Jack Warne. The same Jack Warne that moved to America in the 1980's to build "Kimber America".

This is a picture of a few of my junk box Martin Cadets on a day at the range. All of these EXCEPT the Sportco Club Master, in the front row, are parts rescues built and stocked by me. The Sportco is a "Virgin" from their factory in Australia. The rest are high velocity center fire small bore .225" to .177". The Martini Henry Mk IV, bipod in the middle, is a .219 Donaldson Wasp build. I left the big bores at home that day. Yup, they are show stoppers at the public range. Most young shooters have never even seen one of either model.

I sort of like my Martini's.

GUNS 5 CADET RIFLES AT THE RANGE.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #30
My! what a "Junk" collection! I couldn't even afford to have that much of a "Junk" collection. I'd say your pretty fortunate guy. until today, I'd never seen nor heard of a Cadet. And all chambered in the strangest cartages (To me at least) .310, .225, .177, vary interesting...
 

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Someone say Martini or snider? Here is my pair, both IMA guns as well. reloading for either isnt too bad except for the brass forming. The snider is easy but i do have my share or problems forming the .450/577 cases. No matter what i do i end up ruining quite a few as the neck likes to fold. This is using the 24 gauge shotgun brass. Those cases are very thin and hard to work with compared to regular rifle brass. Anyway once that part is done and you can either make or buy bullets the rest if pretty easy but time consuming and expensive to set up for. The dies alone are $100 or so bucks. Lots of videos in youtube showing how to do it and there seems to be no one set way, many people have slight variations on the loads and loading process. I don't want to twist your arm into shooting them so i won't say how much fun they are.
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Discussion Starter #36
To gvaldeg1: What I meant by the title is what's some antique firearms that are GOING extinct, but are still in fair numbers on the market.

To Square Target: Absolutely LOVE your cache!! That's what I'm trying to make mine look like, but with more German steel. I am especially fond of that Snider. I still hurt inside when I see one, I almost got one, but got the Martini instead. Maybe still will, but would you say the quality is getting worse on IMA? I'm not at all saying they are bad, I love them, its just that there are fewer and fewer of those guns on there now, and I was wondering if the quality is going down as they run out? Could you say anything about that? And I must say we're pretty lucky because at a gunshow we met a nice guy from our area you said he would give us some ammunition to shoot our Martini, at least to test it. (Maybe that's a bad thing, because we'll wont more! lol)
 

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Of the guns listed, I'd need to know if your budget is unrestricted first. There are some on your list that can be found at not so bad prices, but usually will be military arsenal reworked, or mixed parts. But if you're wanting a collectible firearm that will be high value when you buy it, and remain there, then it will be big bucks to purchase.
My choice would be the venerable 1903-A3 and try not to buy an early one in a low serial number. My choice for the most reasonably priced, and still fairly available would be either of the Enfields. But still make sure it's as matching as possible.
But when it comes to collectible rifles I'm not much of a military fan myself. I'd prefer almost any 1800's single shot American made rifle to any military rifle.
 

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To gvaldeg1: What I meant by the title is what's some antique firearms that are GOING extinct, but are still in fair numbers on the market.

To Square Target: Absolutely LOVE your cache!! That's what I'm trying to make mine look like, but with more German steel. I am especially fond of that Snider. I still hurt inside when I see one, I almost got one, but got the Martini instead. Maybe still will, but would you say the quality is getting worse on IMA? I'm not at all saying they are bad, I love them, its just that there are fewer and fewer of those guns on there now, and I was wondering if the quality is going down as they run out? Could you say anything about that? And I must say we're pretty lucky because at a gunshow we met a nice guy from our area you said he would give us some ammunition to shoot our Martini, at least to test it. (Maybe that's a bad thing, because we'll wont more! lol)
I have no idea if the quality is going down or not. I bought these several years ago long after the initial find so i don't know what the first ones out the door looked like and i don't know what's currently being sold. I know you can get several different price points and conditions when ordering, mine were cleaned and complete. I would imagine like any big find some of the best ones were sold early one though and eventually all that will be left is the bottom of the barrel. Both of these seemed mechanically sound and didn't appear abused. Definitely some wood shrinkage on the snider as the butt plate is slighly larger than the wood but that's to be expected on a 150 year old gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Of the guns listed, I'd need to know if your budget is unrestricted first. There are some on your list that can be found at not so bad prices, but usually will be military arsenal reworked, or mixed parts. But if you're wanting a collectible firearm that will be high value when you buy it, and remain there, then it will be big bucks to purchase.
My choice would be the venerable 1903-A3 and try not to buy an early one in a low serial number. My choice for the most reasonably priced, and still fairly available would be either of the Enfields. But still make sure it's as matching as possible.
But when it comes to collectible rifles I'm not much of a military fan myself. I'd prefer almost any 1800's single shot American made rifle to any military rifle.
Unrestricted budget? HA HA HA HA HA HA, I wish! I'm a poor young adult, though, I have been saving for an up coming Gun Show, and that's where I plain to do some trading and buying, I've saved about 240 dollars cash, then I plan to sell my Winchester model 12 (CRY) and my Mosin Nagant (CRY) My first rifle, and first shotgun I ever owned, (Plus a few other trinkets) but, I wont the money to step up the latter. You were talking about collectable firearms and 1903-A3, I have a bucket list of guns and I have the A3 on it, as well as the No.1 MK III Enfield, Gewhr 98, and about 20 others. As for collectability and matching numbers? I don't really care. Not to say that I dislike matching guns, its just that I'm poor and my motto is "I love old guns that work" I'd rather have have a good working antique gun, than a matching one. I came for the gun not because of its specific numbers (Though often I find out what they are before I start throwing money at it) , if its matching, great! if not, it doesn't really matter to me as much as it may to others.
 

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Unrestricted budget? HA HA HA HA HA HA, I wish! I'm a poor young adult, though, I have been saving for an up coming Gun Show, and that's where I plain to do some trading and buying, I've saved about 240 dollars cash, then I plan to sell my Winchester model 12 (CRY) and my Mosin Nagant (CRY) My first rifle, and first shotgun I ever owned, (Plus a few other trinkets) but, I wont the money to step up the latter. You were talking about collectable firearms and 1903-A3, I have a bucket list of guns and I have the A3 on it, as well as the No.1 MK III Enfield, Gewhr 98, and about 20 others. As for collectability and matching numbers? I don't really care. Not to say that I dislike matching guns, its just that I'm poor and my motto is "I love old guns that work" I'd rather have have a good working antique gun, than a matching one. I came for the gun not because of its specific numbers (Though often I find out what they are before I start throwing money at it) , if its matching, great! if not, it doesn't really matter to me as much as it may to others.
That's OK, and I certainly understand a budget, and having to buy as much as your dollars can buy vs. exactly what you want. I think the big addition to your fund will be the Model 12 sale if it's in good shape, but the Nagant wont add much as my local Cabelas still has racks of them that they've had for years unsold. Not a lot of demand for them here anyway.
But with what you've saved, the 12 sale, and the Nagant, you should be able to buy a decent non matching 1903-A3, or Krag, or an above average Enfield. The Enfields don't get as much money, but they seem to also be a little less common these days in original shape. Companies like Century Arms did bring in massive numbers, but they had Kimber of Oregon rebuild huge numbers into plastic stocked sporting rifles. Had a friend who worked at Kimber then, and he has still got pallets full of old Enfield stocks they gave him to take home. Unfortunately he used them as firewood, so those pallets have set outside in the weather for decades, and those still left at his place are ruined.
 
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