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Premium Member
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I say it's the 1911.
Because...............................it's a 1911 :!: :-B-:
 

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Beretta 92 Fanatic
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547 Posts
There is no answer to this - everyone has thier own opinion...

Everyone knows I'll say the P99.... :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

In all honesty, while I don't care for Glocks anymore, I'd probably say the Glock. Zero maintenance gun, or almost...
 

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338 Posts
Without a doubt, it is the 9mm semi-auto. Cheap enough for practice, and, with the right ammo, a great defense weapon. If I could have only one gun, it would be the CZ 75B 9mm.
 

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Harley Dude
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For price and reliability I suppose a Glock model 17 would be at the top of the list! :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
kansas45 said:
I say it's the 1911.
Because...............................it's a 1911 :!: :-B-:
Let me take this one step ferther!

A Rock Island Armory 1911A1!

Best bang for the buck out there and in my opinion one of the best pistols out there overall! :D
 

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Another 1911 vote. Thas gun hasn't been around for almost 100 years because it sucks. ;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I say the one you are comfortable carrying and shooting the most accurate;for me it's a glock 17.
 

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Illinois doesn't trust their citizens enough to carry. :cry:
 

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Right Wing Zealot
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1,228 Posts
I have to say the 1911 also...as far as semi autos go. Most practical handgun would have to be a .357 mag Colt Python with 6" barrel. Reliable, easy to operate, can hunt or have for home defense...plus its the best looking handgun on the planet.
 

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A hi-cap 9mm that's feels comfortable in your hand and has a reputation of reliability. Glock, XD's, S & W M&P...etc. I have owned 1911's but just did'nt feel comfortable carrying cocked & locked.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
glennc said:
A hi-cap 9mm that's feels comfortable in your hand and has a reputation of reliability. Glock, XD's, S & W M&P...etc. I have owned 1911's but just did'nt feel comfortable carrying cocked & locked.
When I first started carrying I felt the same way about the 1911 and it being cocked and locked.

I then researched and studied it and it is truely very safe to cary in the cocked and locked position!

Look at it this way. You have the thumb safety and grip safety that both keep it from fireing without you disengaugeing them, plus if you carry like me you have a strap that not only keeps the gun from falling out of the holster but also keeps the hammer from ever falling all the way and makeing contact with the fireing pin.( As illistrated in the picture)



Any person who knows about the 1911 will back up what I am saying.

A 1911 is very safe to carry and is a fine weapon if and when you ever need to use it!
 

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Just to add my 2 cents, from my 48 years of experience with firearms (which in and of itself does not make me more qualified than anyone else, or my advice any better), and from having "broken-in" and started a fair number of people on the basics of handgun shooting. I've found that most average people (not usually those like us that have a deep and varied background in firearms and are regular haunters and contributors to sites, such as this one) do not spend alot of time practicing. From their "practical" standpoint they want something that is easy to bring into play, reliable and inexpensive to purchase, operate and feed on those several occasions per year when they "qualify" themselves with 50 to 100 rounds of informal shooting at a range. When you consider those needs and wants - the MOST practical for them would be something that does not require a lot of fiddling around with before you can pull the trigger and make it go bang. As has been written over and over - the easiest, safest and surest handgun, has to be a short barreled revolver, most likely in .38 SPL. You load it, you point it, you pull the trigger once, twice, three times, whatever it takes. The second easiest is a "safe-action" or double action only semi-auto. We all know that Glock started this trend and that there are now a couple dozen pistols that fill this bill. From this standpoint, I would say a 9mm is the most practical semi, followed by an equivalent model in .40S&W, which for some is a bit more of a handful. The large number of inexpensive .32 ACPs and .380 ACPs that are still sold is testament to the general publics needs/wants for a "gun" that is inexpensive, easy to operate and reliable. The worst thing you or I can do to a starting shooter is hand them something that deters from their enjoyment and/or encourage them to buy something beyond their needs and wants and in many cases ability or desire to learn to operate properly. When that occurs, the gun sits, unused by the confused or frustrated owner - nothing is gained but a gun sale by the dealer.
The 1911 is a wonderful implement and battle tested - but experience in combat showed the Gov't that the majority of personnel issued and expected to use the Gov't .45, really needed something easier to deploy, operate and shoot well/accurately...- hence the M-1 Carbine. To develop proficiency with a 1911 style pistol requires training and practice beyond most people's desired time alotment or attention span.
Most average people cannot, or simply will not spend enough time practicing with a handgun to become even remotely "proficient", with regards to LE or Military standards, and for them, KISS is the rule. Just my opinion, based upon experience.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
32 Magnum said:
Just to add my 2 cents, from my 48 years of experience with firearms (which in and of itself does not make me more qualified than anyone else, or my advice any better), and from having "broken-in" and started a fair number of people on the basics of handgun shooting. I've found that most average people (not usually those like us that have a deep and varied background in firearms and are regular haunters and contributors to sites, such as this one) do not spend alot of time practicing. From their "practical" standpoint they want something that is easy to bring into play, reliable and inexpensive to purchase, operate and feed on those several occasions per year when they "qualify" themselves with 50 to 100 rounds of informal shooting at a range. When you consider those needs and wants - the MOST practical for them would be something that does not require a lot of fiddling around with before you can pull the trigger and make it go bang. As has been written over and over - the easiest, safest and surest handgun, has to be a short barreled revolver, most likely in .38 SPL. You load it, you point it, you pull the trigger once, twice, three times, whatever it takes. The second easiest is a "safe-action" or double action only semi-auto. We all know that Glock started this trend and that there are now a couple dozen pistols that fill this bill. From this standpoint, I would say a 9mm is the most practical semi, followed by an equivalent model in .40S&W, which for some is a bit more of a handful. The large number of inexpensive .32 ACPs and .380 ACPs that are still sold is testament to the general publics needs/wants for a "gun" that is inexpensive, easy to operate and reliable. The worst thing you or I can do to a starting shooter is hand them something that deters from their enjoyment and/or encourage them to buy something beyond their needs and wants and in many cases ability or desire to learn to operate properly. When that occurs, the gun sits, unused by the confused or frustrated owner - nothing is gained but a gun sale by the dealer.
The 1911 is a wonderful implement and battle tested - but experience in combat showed the Gov't that the majority of personnel issued and expected to use the Gov't .45, really needed something easier to deploy, operate and shoot well/accurately...- hence the M-1 Carbine. To develop proficiency with a 1911 style pistol requires training and practice beyond most people's desired time alotment or attention span.
Most average people cannot, or simply will not spend enough time practicing with a handgun to become even remotely "proficient", with regards to LE or Military standards, and for them, KISS is the rule. Just my opinion, based upon experience.
You are right on with those comments!

What might be the most practical for one person might not be for another.

I am one of the few who does practice quite often as I can go right out in my back yard to shoot so I am only limited on how much ammo I can afford to shoot (which is quite a bit).

I personally feel very comfortable and capable of carrying a 1911. But I practice with them at least 2 times a week with a minimum of 50 rounds on each outing. In the last year I have shot well over 10000 rounds through my 1911's.

I also do have a Taurus 38 Revolver that I do carry at times as well because it is easier to conceal when I am dressed in shorts and a T-shirt. as it fits well in my pocket and my 1911's will not.
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Based on the discussion above I may have to reconsider and say the Revolver in 38 special could be the better choice for folks that are not trained, and are not interested in learning the idiosyncrasies of a semi-auto.
 

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Premium Member
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2,253 Posts
It seems that every body has his or her's own idea about this topic.
Guess what? We're ALL right!
I like my 1911's & feel very comfortable with the "Cocked & Locked" kind of carry. I dont have any problem with a round in the chamber of one of my XD's either. Shipwreck likes his P99's, other of us like their revolvers. My P89 Ruger works well for this too. The main thing is, if we are careful & follow all of the -r- of safe gun handling, then we can & should use whatever pistol we are comfortable with.
Be careful, understand your choice of weapon, & you won't have any trouble. :-B-:
Sam
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
1911A1 springfield

Took it 4-wheeling yesterday, one of the bunch had his 11 year old boy along
kid wanted to shoot it
so we sat down in the middle of no-where, had him recite 10 commandments
until he knew them, stripped the .45, put it back together, anatomy lesson
features and safety, earplugs, and he shot a tighter group than i can.
a good boy!

too bad a .45 won't kill a bear...
bear country, i carry a super redhawk .44 mag with some flat lead bullets
on what Barne's book allows for powder
in a pinch, can always split firewood with it
redhawk been swimming enough, it almost knows the backstroke
doesn't float for a darn, though
 
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