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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I want to "reload" some 20 gauge shotshells with 20 gauge 'round ball' and some others with '00' Buck. The shot shells are 2 3/4, loaded with 6, 7 1/2, and 8 shot. I want to empty the existing shot and reload them as described. I am a reload novice and need to know how to best accomplish this and make sure I don't lose compression in the shell,...or blow anything up.
I am NOT removing the wad or powder load. I am trying to repurpose factory shells because I am unable to find 'round ball' and '00' Buck in factory made. I located one box (10 rds) of HERTER'S 20 gauge Round Ball at an auction, and recently came across a bulk lot of loose 20 gauge Round Ball "shot" and a bulk lot of loose '00' Buck.
I am going to try my repurposing idea anyway, but was hoping to get some advice since I haven't done ANY reloading. I do not have the normal reloader equipment, even for hand loading, but am not avert to buy some to accomplish this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I want to "reload" some 20 gauge shotshells with 20 gauge 'round ball' and some others with '00' Buck. The shot shells are 2 3/4, loaded with 8, 7 1/2, and 8 shot. I want to empty the existing shot and reload them as described. I am a reload novice and need to know how to best accomplish this and make sure I don't lose compression in the shell,...or blow anything up.
I am NOT removing the wad or powder load. I am trying to repurpose factory shells because I am unable to find 'round ball' and '00' Buck in factory made. I located one box (10 rds) of HERTER'S 20 gauge Round Ball at an auction, and recently came across a bulk lot of loose 20 gauge Round Ball "shot" and a bulk lot of loose '00' Buck.
I am going to try my repurposing idea anyway, but was hoping to get some advice since I haven't done ANY reloading. I do not have the normal reloader equipment, even for hand loading, but am not avert to buy some to accomplish this.
"...6, 7 1/2, and 8 shot."
 

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Shotshells are more forgiving in reloading but I would not recommend what you are trying to do. Why would you want to load a solid lead ball? Why wouldn't you just look for 00 buckshot or slugs for use in your 20 ga. If you have never reloaded before count your blessings on all your fingers.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Shotshells are more forgiving in reloading but I would not recommend what you are trying to do. Why would you want to load a solid lead ball? Why wouldn't you just look for 00 buckshot or slugs for use in your 20 ga. If you have never reloaded before count your blessings on all your fingers.
Like I said, I found a box of Herter's 20 gauge "Two Ball" cartridges. They are factory made and I like the efect they have when they strike their target (think slug x2). I have seen some new factory rounds that are ball/shot cartridges, ball in front, shot in back, but that is not what I'm looking for. As for '00' for 20 ga., I have been looking consistently. I am able to find 2 Buck, and occassionally 1 Buck, but nothing in the '0's.
I don't understand what hazard you are referring to of counting my blessing on all my fingers. The cartridges are all factory loads, just in 6, 7 1/2, and 8 shot. All I want to do is replace the shot and re-seal the shell. I am not changing anything else about the cartridges. I have already removed the shot from several in the past and they basically became "party poppers". They had no recoil, very little "pop", and spit the wad about 15 ft. I am wondering why one couldn't just replace the existing shot with the ball or buck and reseal the shell. Seems like it would be similar to the final steps in a standard reload process.
I am asking because I honestly don't see a problem other than not getting a good seal and losing the pressure necessary to make them effective. That is why I am asking. I thought someone here would have that information on a better platform than just an internet video.
So how do you properly re-seal the shell to get proper pressure?
 

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I'd suggest a roll crimp for round ball loads, these also make a pretty good crimp for shot when combined with overshot cards. The lifespan of the roll crimped hulls seems to be shortened when compared to a star crimp. Nothing wrong with round ball loads if they are loaded to within reasonable pressures. What type of loading press are you working with?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd suggest a roll crimp for round ball loads, these also make a pretty good crimp for shot when combined with overshot cards. The lifespan of the roll crimped hulls seems to be shortened when compared to a star crimp. Nothing wrong with round ball loads if they are loaded to within reasonable pressures. What type of loading press are you working with?
I do not have a press, or even hand load equipment. The shells I am working with have a rounded edge (roll crimp?) with separation lines in the middle. I am trying to find out the best way to repurpose factory shells after removing the existing shot loads. I know when there is no shot load the shells are "weak". I want to know how to reseal them after I trade shot loads, and if I need a buffer substance around the '00'. The factory shells are 6, 7 1/2, and 8, and not buffered.
Just trying to learn if this idea will work.
 

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You are playing with fire, my friend.

Get yourself a loading manual and read it. You'll need to get some very basic equipment, for sure.

What you're not paying attention to is that when you disassemble it, it's no longer a factory load. You'll put different pellets in there which means that the recipe the factory used is not in effect any more. You also have no idea what powder is in the shell so you can't even determine what is going to happen with the shot you put in there.

AND IT MAY NOT BE SAFE ANY MORE.

In short, you're playing with fire. Literally.

Personally, I like my eyeballs and fingertips where they are.

Seriously, get a loading manual and some basic equipment and learn to do it right.

--Wag--
 

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Many years ago, when I knew everything, I lived in South Louisiana. My dad wouldn't let me take my 22 hunting. I could take my shotguns anywhere I wanted to go, but no 22. Also, I couldn't use buckshot (I don't think he wanted to have to go into the swamp and drag out a dead deer). Well, I decided that I could circumvent the two restrictions by achieving a compromise, and a clandestine one at that. This was before plastic shot shells. I found that if I cut off the 410 paper shell about half an inch above the shot wad I could drop a 36 cal ball inside and fold over the crimp with my fingers it would hold. Additionally, it made a neat little "plunk" sound when fired. It wouldn't kill a deer (not that I saw many) but it would kill a rabbit right now, and wouldn't tear it all up with a bunch of shot. It worked great and I brought home quite a few rabbits done up that way. One evening we were enjoying some fried swamp rabbit at dinner and my dad suddenly stopped chewing. He then dropped a 36 cal ball in the plate with a "clinkityclank". He just looked at me and took another bite. He never said a word about it, but I decided not to push my luck.....

There were some older noitalls that told of the devastating effects that a stack of dimes fired from a shotgun would have on a target. One day I decided to see for myself if it were true. Fortunately my frugality was stronger than my common sense and the thought of blasting off a $3 (which was a lot of money for me in those days) blast was not worth it. I think a box of 12 ga then was less than $2.

My grandfather told of a time during and after WWII that rifle ammunition was nearly nonexistent. They would cut through a shotgun shell at the middle of the shot wad and fire it at deer. The whole front of the shell would travel out of the muzzle intact. It worked and killed deer too (when they could find a deer. They were scarce also.). More than one shotgun had a ringed barrel as a result of that practice.

The point....

There's a lot of monkeyshines you can do with guns and reloading. Most of the time the guns are very forgiving and God does suffer fools quietly at times, but, not for very long... There are a lot of things that can go wrong. When loading or reloading any type of ammunition, the ultimate goal is to produce the safest, highest quality product possible. "Almost good enough" and "It'll do" may produce at best something that works, and at worst a mangled gun, hand, eye or brain.

As expensive as ammunition is right now a $1 shot shell is not worth your gun, hand, eye, or brain. There's plenty of places to get what you want. Or, as has been suggested, buy a loading manual, read it, study it, and load your own properly. A used Mec loader and gear can be had pretty cheap and they work great for what you are wanting to do. There's a good chance you may regret doing it wrong, but it is unlikely you will regret doing it right.



Alan
 

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I have to agree with Coal on this! If you're trying to substitute shot loads for solids or round ball using the same powder charges you are playing a very dangerous game. Reloading requires following specific and safe recipes from manuals and use of proper equipment. Load development must be worked up very carefully. Round ball and slug loads are possible but they require specific equipment to produce safe and accurate loads and most importantly get a manual for shotshell reloading and follow the instructions.
 

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You need to know the load that is in the existing shells but you'll probably never find that info. Second you would need to know the load for the one you are doing. For this you would need a loading manual. The loads are almost guaranteed to not be the same and probably not even close. With the wrong loads you risk literally blowing your gun up along with your hands/face. Best advice I would give is to shoot the existing rounds and then reload them after you research the load you want. They can be loaded using some very basic hand tools and knowledge. I use tools like this to load black powder shotgun shells.
Hand tool Product Wood Tool Font
 

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Man, you've got the whole setup! What do you use for depriming?

Alan
 
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Man, you've got the whole setup! What do you use for depriming?

Alan
That's not my stuff, just a internet pic. I don't use as much as shown because I use brass cases so no crimp needed. For depriming I can use some dies that mount in a rifle press. I mostly just use a dowel that has a small nail or something mounted in it and tap them out over a bench block. Being they are BP rounds I do that so I can clean them right away and not run some fouled up cases through my die.
 

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Do NOT do this. Get a reloading manual and read it, then read it again.
Then buy yourself a Lee Classic Loader in 20 gauge. Follow the recipes to the “T” when reloading your shells. If you can’t find the recipe that you are trying to achieve then there is a reason for that.

Start with all new components, try “Ballistic Products”. They have everything you need to get started reloading shotgun shells.

Try ebay for the reloader.

Remember follow the recipe and you will have fun reloading. Follow them not and bad things can and will happen.
 

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So your attempting to load slugs with powder charges for shot?
If so you maybe heading for self harm and dammage to your shotgun.
THIS.
It is a really bad idea.
Start with already fired shells if you wish to reload them.
Substituting projectiles over a powder and load designed for another
projectile is a BAD IDEA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Do NOT do this. Get a reloading manual and read it, then read it again.
Then buy yourself a Lee Classic Loader in 20 gauge. Follow the recipes to the “T” when reloading your shells. If you can’t find the recipe that you are trying to achieve then there is a reason for that.

Start with all new components, try “Ballistic Products”. They have everything you need to get started reloading shotgun shells.

Try ebay for the reloader.

Remember follow the recipe and you will have fun reloading. Follow them not and bad things can and will happen.
UPDATE:
So far so good. Got the Lee press in 20 ga. . Located 11.5 lbs of 20 ga full bore round ball at auction and bid to win. Purchased several reloading manuals for shotshell and pistol and rifle at auction. Am reading them as time allows withmy job, etc. . Bought brand new 20 ga 3" hulls and plastic wads for slugs, as well. I figure I'll read up before I puchase the primers and the powder so I'm sure of what I'm buying, but I'm keeping an eye on prices. Trying not to let it get too high before i start stocking.
 

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Very good. I'm sure you'll be much better off and you'll be more pleased than you ever could be with the OP method!

Keep your eyes peeled for primers and powder. They're getting hard to come by.

--Wag--
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Very good. I'm sure you'll be much better off and you'll be more pleased than you ever could be with the OP method!

Keep your eyes peeled for primers and powder. They're getting hard to come by.

--Wag--
I can find them all over the place in on-line auctions, but no one will ship them because of the classification and costs.
 
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