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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is from possible armed criminal attacks. Certainly, teachers and other faculty should carry concealed and be trained. What other measures can be taken?
It seems as "active shooter" drills can scare kids to death. When I went to school we had fire drills. The worst thing I had to fear was getting beat up by a bully
or getting spanked for being naughty.


Extra: I don't like the attitude of adults with small children as seen in the video above: "you guys did a fabulous job, high five" is highly inappropriate for children so small.

This "high five" and "you guys" stuff sounds ghetto-ish, street-like. When I went kindergarten, the teacher would say, "children" or "boys and girls". Shaking hands would have much more class for congratulations than "high five" for preschoolers and elementary-school-age children. "High five" might be OK in high school.
 

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Live Free
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I would rather children be a little afraid and thus have some training, than to be burying them because we did nothing. Acting as if we must never do anything that might possibly scare them allows them to be better targets. We do not need to traumatize them, but we can help them understand that if bad things come our way, we know what to do; positive incentives can help greatly.

Not sure why high fives are even brought up here; do what it takes to teach and prepare and encourage their success.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
I would rather children be a little afraid and thus have some training, than to be burying them because we did nothing. Acting as if we must never do anything that might possibly scare them allows them to be better targets. We do not need to traumatize them, but we can help them understand that if bad things come our way, we know what to do; positive incentives can help greatly.

Not sure why high fives are even brought up here; do what it takes to teach and prepare and encourage their success.
Since "high fives" were in the video anyway I felt I had to say something about it here. It was just an extra tidbit. That's all. I was just shocked about how lax teachers and faculty are these days in their decorums and demeanors. I had to make an observation. Teachers were much less lax when I went to school. My second-grade teacher did not even like the word KID used for CHILD. She said a KID was a GOAT.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Homeschool.
Homeschool would be the safest but children wouldn't get as much socialization. Introversion is psychologically bad.
Perhaps public schools should be designed like county courthouses with airtight entries and guards.
 

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My opinion

I've been advocating this idea for many years. Okay to tell the truth once Clinton took office. Place an armed unemployed Vet at every entry point. We are already trained, We are highly Motivated, We love children. Just my Opinion
 

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The world is a dangerous place, simple as that. We must teach our kids how to live in it. Notice, I didn't say anything about teaching them to be safe, or to survive, although that's a component of living, absolutely. I want to be broad stroke about it and say, clearly, that kids need to learn to grow up in a world and become excellent adults. If a high five is the reward that is meaningful to a kid and gets the point across to them, it's only a reflection of the generational difference that exists now, just like differences exist between all generations of people. There's a time for proper English usage and time for slang. Judicious use of each is the right thing to do.

Home schooling is a valuable way to teach your kids. Personally, I think it's best but, like all things, there are trade-offs. What I see some parents doing is teaching their kids at home until they're about to start 7th or 9th grade and then mainstreaming them. The learning habits they learned while young and in home schooling will serve them through the rest of school and throughout their adult lives. As the old proverb says, "Train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old, he will not depart from it."

Another proverb says, "Be as wise as serpents," which I've always taken to mean, "Understand the world you live in so you can do well, be successful, survive and be able to pass it all along to your kids." How many kids know how to actually change a tire on their car? Cook a decent meal and understand the nutrition behind it? Balance a checkbook? Know how to write a check? (Okay, we don't use checks any more at home, necessarily but it's still useful to know.) Do their freakin' laundry or wash dishes? Set up a bank account or buy insurance with wisdom and discretion? Write a well-thought out essay with arguments and discussion to arrive at a point in 3,000 words?

And on and on. One of the most critical failings of the school system nowadays (and for the last 50 years) is that it doesn't teach kinds to think critically. Or think at all.

I've digressed badly. Back to surviving in schools. This is a trophy generation. Somehow, American society has this idea that people shouldn't get their feelings hurt, that they shouldn't fail or lose or have any disruption of a nice, easy life. That we shouldn't have competition as we move through classes getting grades or swinging a bat at home plate. The effect of all of that comes down to our kids turning to jelly whenever something scary comes their way. They don't know how to do something about it. They don't know how to fight another kid when that other kid is bullying them or others. Our kids are being taught to cower in fear rather than stand up for themselves.

Obviously, they're not going to take out a gunman but rather than cower under a desk waiting to be killed along with all of their classmates and teachers, they need to learn to escape, decisively and without losing their minds. But they aren't equipped to do so with all of the other garbage they are being taught. We are not teaching our kids to be as "wise as serpents." We are teaching them that they are not in control of their lives and destiny and that they cannot, nay, that they dare not be strong and upstanding. We are teaching them to be weak and to cower beneath the next boot that treads upon their necks.

This thread has me in a rage. Sorry about that. The upside, though, is that we have opportunity with our own kids to raise them in a way that is now considered contrarian, a way that was once the norm. Those of us who teach our children the priceless lessons of strength and wisdom in the face of all the new stuff they have to deal with, will give them a huge advantage over their peers on the years to come. We'll prepare them for leadership over others too weak to do anything but follow the lead of the people WE raise to lead them.

--Wag--
 

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Live Free
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The world is a dangerous place, simple as that. We must teach our kids how to live in it. Notice, I didn't say anything about teaching them to be safe, or to survive, although that's a component of living, absolutely. I want to be broad stroke about it and say, clearly, that kids need to learn to grow up in a world and become excellent adults. If a high five is the reward that is meaningful to a kid and gets the point across to them, it's only a reflection of the generational difference that exists now, just like differences exist between all generations of people. There's a time for proper English usage and time for slang. Judicious use of each is the right thing to do.

Home schooling is a valuable way to teach your kids. Personally, I think it's best but, like all things, there are trade-offs. What I see some parents doing is teaching their kids at home until they're about to start 7th or 9th grade and then mainstreaming them. The learning habits they learned while young and in home schooling will serve them through the rest of school and throughout their adult lives. As the old proverb says, "Train up a child in the way he should go and when he is old, he will not depart from it."

Another proverb says, "Be as wise as serpents," which I've always taken to mean, "Understand the world you live in so you can do well, be successful, survive and be able to pass it all along to your kids." How many kids know how to actually change a tire on their car? Cook a decent meal and understand the nutrition behind it? Balance a checkbook? Know how to write a check? (Okay, we don't use checks any more at home, necessarily but it's still useful to know.) Do their freakin' laundry or wash dishes? Set up a bank account or buy insurance with wisdom and discretion? Write a well-thought out essay with arguments and discussion to arrive at a point in 3,000 words?

And on and on. One of the most critical failings of the school system nowadays (and for the last 50 years) is that it doesn't teach kinds to think critically. Or think at all.

I've digressed badly. Back to surviving in schools. This is a trophy generation. Somehow, American society has this idea that people shouldn't get their feelings hurt, that they shouldn't fail or lose or have any disruption of a nice, easy life. That we shouldn't have competition as we move through classes getting grades or swinging a bat at home plate. The effect of all of that comes down to our kids turning to jelly whenever something scary comes their way. They don't know how to do something about it. They don't know how to fight another kid when that other kid is bullying them or others. Our kids are being taught to cower in fear rather than stand up for themselves.

Obviously, they're not going to take out a gunman but rather than cower under a desk waiting to be killed along with all of their classmates and teachers, they need to learn to escape, decisively and without losing their minds. But they aren't equipped to do so with all of the other garbage they are being taught. We are not teaching our kids to be as "wise as serpents." We are teaching them that they are not in control of their lives and destiny and that they cannot, nay, that they dare not be strong and upstanding. We are teaching them to be weak and to cower beneath the next boot that treads upon their necks.

This thread has me in a rage. Sorry about that. The upside, though, is that we have opportunity with our own kids to raise them in a way that is now considered contrarian, a way that was once the norm. Those of us who teach our children the priceless lessons of strength and wisdom in the face of all the new stuff they have to deal with, will give them a huge advantage over their peers on the years to come. We'll prepare them for leadership over others too weak to do anything but follow the lead of the people WE raise to lead them.

--Wag--
Excellent! Well said.
 

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Thank you, sir. Much more can be said about it. It's a thought that's been on my mind nearly constantly for the last 10 years and it's only getting worse as time continues to fly forward. There's no room for black and white thinking about it, either. Too many shades of grey in every aspect of it.

--Wag--
 

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Since "high fives" were in the video anyway I felt I had to say something about it here. It was just an extra tidbit. That's all. I was just shocked about how lax teachers and faculty are these days in their decorums and demeanors. I had to make an observation. Teachers were much less lax when I went to school. My second-grade teacher did not even like the word KID used for CHILD. She said a KID was a GOAT.
Okay, but you are not in the second grade anymore. I appreciate teachers who are invested in children and strive to engage with them. On the other hand, I think it is foolish to leave teaching our children all to teachers. Homeschooling works quite well in most situations and parents are more invested in the future of their children, as they ought to be. Parents of children in public schools are failing their children if they leave all their education to the school system; parents need to prepare and equip their children to be successful in life! It is a parental responsibility.
 

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Homeschool would be the safest but children wouldn't get as much socialization. Introversion is psychologically bad.
Perhaps public schools should be designed like county courthouses with airtight entries and guards.
You have been listening to teacher unions and liberal media. Homeschool isn't what you think it is. There are plenty of homeschool "groups" that coordinate classes, field trips, projects, etc.. Children get plenty of socialization with other homeschoolers and more focused instruction. All the homeschoolers I've encountered have grown up to be well rounded, intelligent, law-abiding citizens.
 
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If you want to protect kids in school from some sort of armed attack by an intruder, you need effective and pro-active measures in place to detect the danger early, challenge it early and as far away from the "protected" as possible. You don't do that by arming teachers and calling it a plan. Unless the attack spawns from inside the classroom, a teacher does not likely have the occasion to contribute meaningfully toward proper or competent security of the facility. If they want to arm teachers, great.. arm them. I think a teacher can be part of the plan as a measure of last resort. The primary task of protection should fall to well trained and experienced people who are accustomed to carrying out protective services. Putting yet another hat on a teacher is not the answer in my book, its a feel good measure.

Just like anywhere else on the planet, the edicts of protection should be followed if you want a competent plan that will likely yield desired results. That sort of endeavor will cost money and require assigning people, tech, policy, logistics, facility design, security implements, contributions and cooperation from LEO partners, training as well as half a dozen other issues to their already strained budget. Unfortunately, putting yet another hat on a teacher is considered by many to be a cost effective half measure.
 

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If you want to protect kids in school from some sort of armed attack by an intruder, ..... You don't do that by arming teachers and calling it a plan. ..... Putting yet another hat on a teacher is not the answer in my book, its a feel good measure.

.....

DS,
Who in that video or where in this thread, did any one mention arming teachers?
 

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Well Gosh....LOL
I watched vid and read posts and missed the first 2 sentences?!
I just didn't see any teachers in vid that I would want to train and arm.
 

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I would like to see a Federally supplemented Bill to place an armed unemployed Veteran at every entrance. We would be helping our Vets and our Public school systems. Us vets are trained, motivated we love our children.
 

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FASTER is a non-profit program that trains teachers and administrator volunteers to act as an armed, first reaction defense team. More than 20 States have recognized this program and supported it in their schools.
 

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If they want to arm Teachers as the ONLY mechanism to detect, mitigate or defend against violence, I would consider that a half measure. How they construct, design and operate schools need to change. I also think that protecting a school and its students needs to be a singular responsibility of trained and experienced professionals. Teachers wear enough hats, we should probably allow them to focus their efforts on teaching. I have no issue with a Teacher being armed as a measure of last resort, I simply disagree with them being the tip of the spear. It goes without saying that armed teachers should be trained and be required to continue their training annually.
 
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