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I'm new to reloading, and I'm asking for detailed advice for what exactly I will need to reload 45 ACP for as cheap as possible. That includes the re loader, bullets, shells, primers and powder.
I have no idea where to start...
If you could give me links to the products, I would very much appreciate it!
 

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detailed advice would fill volumes probably.........

"as cheap as possible" usually means Lee Precision products. I continue to use LEE after many years.....cheap or not it is at best very good......certainly adequate at the least.

cheap as possible also means the LEE CLASSIC LOADER. With this tool, you need a flat surface and a hammer......that's it equipment wise. Expect production to be low in slow and low in production but it works. No need to purchase dies, xtra powder handling equipment, the need for a loadng bench. Its rather primitive but it works well. Lee Loader 45 Auto - Lee Precision expect production to be slow.......i use one of these for the 45 colt and take my time......i do a blistering 20 rounds/hour but i do not get in a hurry.

step up to this Lee product to avoid the hammer and have an easier time priming but yet also avoid the need for a dedicated sturdy loading bench and still portable. You can still use the dipper for powder handling but will need to purchase dies. the hand press Breech Lock Hand Press Kit - Lee Precision and here are the dies 3 Die Set 45acp Carbide - Lee Precision i say go for carbide dies.

next in cost savings is a bench mounted press......you need a good bench or you need to mount the press to a short 2x6 and then C-clamp that to the kitchen table. This one is an option Reloader Press - Lee Precision and this one is an option Breech Lock Challenger Press - Lee Precision i actually am still using an older version of the challenger and am quite happy with it.....production on avg is 50/rds hour. At the very minimum, you still need to purchase a set of LEE carbide dies with the included powder dipper and shell holder as previously noted.

check out the lee precision site and just look over everything. The site also includes several "how to" videos as does a search on you tube.

that is the cheap route.......and it works. You will need to decide on components yourself as you learn more in the manual and discover just what exactly what you want to build. Probably simple choices there with simple equipment.......standard large pistol primers, cast lead 230 gr RN bullets to keep costs down, and a powder that works within the range of the supplied LEE dipper with the dies. The dies will include a powder chart with recomendations.

All suggestions above revolve around "cheap as possible"......and still building decent ammunition.......
 

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you can also visit several retail order sites to get an idea on actual street price of the equipment or shop various retailers to compare locally. Starting off, i would suggest buying primers, powder at a brick and mortar store to avoid hazmat fees on top of shipping fees.

be sure to get a good book.......Lee has one as does lyman and several others.
 

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I decided about a year ago to start reloading. I started researching how and what to do. I have a brother who is a big competition shooter and very knowledgable about reloading which really helped. In my research and reading I went from wanting to load to it's to scary I don't know what I am doing No way am I doing this. Hang in there.
I recomend getting a couple manuals. One of the above (I preferred the Lyman) and read it, I don't mean just read but study it and understand what you are reading. If there is something they say you don't understand then google it and understand what they are saying. Try and find someone who is knowledgable about reloading that you can ask about things you are not sure of. Also read some reloading threads on this forum. Wag just posted a thread about logging and I had a thread recently about adjusting seating depth. Those will both be helpful to you.
I would not buy a press until you gain some knowledge about whats available to purchase and what the differences are. I took a different road than most did on my press and what just about everyone recomended. Everyone says to start with a single stage press (which I would to) but I went with the progressive press first because I had my brothers help and the press I went with will do anything I would ever need it to do.
I would recomend you look for a reloading class somewhere in your area. There is a ton of stuff to learn, I felt like I was in school again. The end result is you will have a great sense of satisfaction in the end and you will learn more than you would have imagined when you started.
As far as saving money, YES, NO. (that helps does'nt it) You will not save as much as you think you will, but you will be able to shoot more and that makes it worth while.
In your research you will be able to get how much all of your components will cost and even figure up how much each round will cost. Right now I can make a 9mm bullet 124 gr lead cast for .07 cents but that does not count wear an tear on the brass. Also I spent around $800 on equipment getting started. Again I did not go with the cheaper press and I did go with one of the most expensive presses. You can probably get started for about half of that if you went the cheap route and then upgrade when you are ready,

Anyone could answer this question in a small book but I believe you should start just take your time and learn well. You will not do this to save money because it will take you at least a couple years to recover your money and probably 4 or 5. But you will gain a new very intriguing skill set and it will keep growing the more you feed it.Plus you will gain better quality and confidence.


I hope this helps.

As far as how cost effective over years loading 9mm will save you money but it will take years to recover your investment. But this will be accelerated by buying more guns of different calibers. I did actually figure this up loading lead cast bullets.once and just to get you started it will take about 6000 rounds of 9mm to recover you initial investment. Understand there are lots of variables there and the numbers I used figured on the equipment I purchased.


This is an older post I copied maybe it will assist.
 

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crockett007
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Cheap as possible?....I reload several handgun and rifle calibers. It doesn't save me any money...it just let's me shoot MORE. I don't reload for commercial reasons, I reload for accuracy and the fun of it. Even with bargain basement equipment, brass bullets and primers will send your ass to the poorhouse.
 

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Not counting what equipment you will buy and your time making reloaded bullets, I can make 9mm in the brass I already have for .09 and 45 acp for .16 each. So yes the savings is huge over shelf prices but if you count time and equipment cost it takes time to recover your cost. I bought some nicer equipment and it took me over 6000 rounds produced in 9mm just to break even on the equipment at prices from 2 years ago. This is not counting my time. You will recover your cost in time. It is worth it in the end because knowledge gained is priceless.
Yes you will shoot more than you were, so that will add to your cost but that is the reason you are wanting to start reloading. You can start with a Lee classic reloader package and spend about $400 getting started.
 
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