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I was looking at a used Enfield recently, but put it back in the rack not buying it. I walked away. Somethings been eating at me. (I had one years ago. I loved it, and I let her go—like a fool!)

Some months ago, I read an article about how a lot of barrels are worn out after 1000 rounds, especially for the magnum cartridges. How true is this with older barrels? I understand there is such a thing as metal fatigue. Were older barrels just better built? I’d like a .303 for hunting deer, and maybe even elk.

This being said, it cured to me that I don’t really know what to look for in a used barrel. I understand the idea of pitting. But aside from using a bore light, I wouldn’t know what more to look for. Any recommendations would be appreciated. I have had used weapons before, but I’ve been very picky (and lucky).

Just to ask, does anyone sell refurbished Enfields? Really, I’m interested in a well-made sporter.
 

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Type of cartridge, rate of fire, cleaning regime and barrel steel plus your accuracy expectations will determine the longevity of your barrel life.

A bore light tells you a whole lot of nothing about a barrel. A borescope on the other hand can give you a clue about throat erosion/fire cracking and overall appearance of the bore. It won't tell you about the accuracy or lack of, said barrels potential.
 

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1,000 rounds sounds too quick for a barrel to be worn out, unless it's made from low quality steel or hasn't been maintained, but I've been wrong before.
 

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if the price is right and its what you want.....go for it. you are always taking a chance when buying a used gun that you are taking on an unknown history and potentially someone else's problems....

if you buy from a good reliable and trusted source, make sure you know what their return policy is......it will at least help in the immediate short term so you can inspect and get it on paper.....

where my main concerns would be would involve headspace.....a few rounds down range heating it up will tell the tale if it is an immediate problem....

you can also resort to go/no go gages and inspect the crown......it would seem on a lot of old military rifles.....especially semis.....that cleaning rod wear on the crown is a concern...
 
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