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Discussion Starter #1
Here for your viewing pleasure are photos of my WWI British-proofed .45ACP Colt Government Model pistol C 13731 which was 1 of 300 shipped to the London Armoury Company on November 18 1914. The London Commercial proof and view marks (Crown/V and Crown/intertwined GP) are visible on top of barrel and on left side of slide above Rampant Colt and left side of frame below thumb safety. The accompanying US Model 1912 holster is marked 1st LT G C Wilkins. The owner of this pistol was 1st Lt George Carl Wilkins, a 1918 Harvard Graduate. He entered Officers' Training Camp at Plattsburg NY in May 1917; commissioned 1st Lt Infantry August 15; assigned to 301st Machine Gun Battalion, 76th Division and sailed for France July 8, 1918. He was transferred to the 146th Machine Gun Battalion, 41st Division on November 9 1918 and returned to the U.S. on February 25, 1919. He transferred to the 153rd Depot Brigade, Camp Dix on 27 February and was discharged on 25 May 1919.
 

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Impressive to say the least. I`m jealous! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hi Freedomring: This one is strickly a look at and admire pistol; I take out my 01918 Colt re-issue WWI 1911 and 1913 British-proofed Colt Gov't Model out to the range. The 1913 performs flawlessly for a century-old pistol!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Here's some more information for 1st LT Wilkins; interesting that his father was English and that he was given familiarization training for the Colt Model 1895 machine gun by an English officer.
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Workman, Clark & Co. in Belfast, Ireland built the fifth ship named Cardiganshire in 1913 with a tonnage of 9,426grt, a length of 520ft, a beam of 62ft 5in and a service speed of 14 knots. She was launched for Royal Mail Steam Packet Company but allocated to the Shire Line for the Far East run and was the largest and fastest ship on that route. In September of 1914 she was used to ferry units of the British Expeditionary Forces across the Channel and in February of 1915 was taken over by the Admiralty for a voyage to Zeebruge with troops and war supplies. As the ship approached Zeebruge the Belgian pilot ordered full speed ahead and steered her into the mole causing damage to the bow. The pilot was subsequently arrested, investigated and shot for sabotage. In April of 1915 she participated in the Dardanelles campaign. On 14th January 1917, a submarine in the Mediterranean chased her and later that year crossed the Atlantic and brought US troops to Britain. Her first reported trip carrying US troops was on 28 May 1918 when the 2nd Trench Mortar Battalion embarked aboard the Cardiganshire at Port of Embarkation Boston, MA. and sailed the next day 29th May, 1918. The HMS Cardiganshire sailed with 20 Officers and 886 enlisted men of the 2nd Trench Mortar Battalion and 32 Officers and 726 enlisted men of the HQ Co., Supply Co. Batteries E & F of the 309th Field Artillery, 78th Division. The Cardiganshire arrived overseas on June 12, 1918.
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