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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Trying hard not to laugh (I'm a newbie), would someone kindly explain to me why one dire warning after another follows on the heels of other dire warnings not to clean handgun and rifle barrels from the muzzle end lest the barrel crown be damaged? What kind of cockeyed information is that? Barrels are made from the toughest metals metallurgists can contrive and cleaning rods consist of sissy stuff like aluminum and brass — as far as I can see, it's the cleaning rod that's in trouble.

Further, how does one run a rod breech first through a revolver? This is all very confusing. Also, I've read that there are little plastic devices to protect the muzzle from the lunacies of muzzle first nitwits. Is this true? If so why can't the muzzle-first criminals continue their unwholesome practices in safety?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My cleaning rods are steel. The aluminum rods will get scratched and will imbed grit in them. Muzzle guides are brass funnel shaped doo hickeys that keep your cleaning rod from touching the crown, and I highly recommend that you use one when cleaning a revolver or lever action or any gun that must be cleaned from the muzzle. I buy all my cleaning supplies from Pro-Shot Products. There stuff is top notch.
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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55,659 Posts
Steel on steel will erode steel, even barrel steel. Since the muzzle of the barrel is the last thing the projectile touches as it travels out the barrel, any non-uniformity, no matter how small, will negatively effect the projectile's path. This equals inaccuracy.

Dirt embedded in non steel cleaning rods will do the same thing as steel rods.

The US military learned this in WWII with the M1 Garand and its steel link cleaning chains and steel cleaning rods.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
another reason to clean from the breech is to avoid getting any solvents into your trigger assembly. it will gum it up quickly and change the pull especially if youve had trigger work done.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
russtang said:
Is it better to use a bore snake?
IMHO, no. A bore snake is good for a quick cursory cleaning, but to really get your bore clean takes a little time and effort. I use Hoppes #9 until the powder fouling is almost gone, then switch to a good copper cleaner and use it until it comes out clear. If fouling is really bad I also use a bronze brush.
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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55,659 Posts
I do not use boresnakes. They offer something for nothing. Scam!
 
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