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Grand Imperial Poobah
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Your link is for a laser, not a red dot. Red dot sights look like .....

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I'm assuming you are thinking about getting a laser. If so, why?
 

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Thinking of buying a trigger mounted red dot. This is the only one I've found that fits my pistol.

I'm relatively new to firearms so any comments, advice, or suggestions are welcome.

Cheers,
I have two Viridian lasers mounted on guns… and have had no issues with them. I practice with them and they seem to hold zero just fine.

you may have an issue finding a holster to fit once you install…

I tend to use pocket holsters for my small mouse guns… which generally will accommodate a laser mounted on/in front of the trigger guard
 

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Thinking of buying a trigger mounted red dot. This is the only one I've found that fits my pistol.
Well you showed a laser site, not a red dot.
A red dot is a floating dot sight that can mount on a rail or replace the rear sight in many handguns.
The laser is a pointer that is handy for dimly lit area and times when you can't raise the firearm up to sight it with reg. sights.
Have you looked at Amazon or Cheaper Than Dirt for more options?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Apparently I didn't know a red dot from a laser. I humbly stand corrected. I thought the lasers were called red dots because they left a dot on the target. Like when I'm playing with the dog with a laser pointer I don't say he's chasing the laser. The dog is chasing the dot.

As to why. I'm assuming that there could be defense situations where the opportunity to take careful aim through iron sights could be difficult or impossible. Isn't that what they're for?

So what is a 'red dot' and how do they work?
 

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Glad you're here to learn. New people have a tendency to be afraid to ask questions because old farts like us are too ready to criticize. Not a good thing. But you seem to be resistant to that criticism which is excellent. You'll go far.

A red dot sight looks like a small profile scope on the top of a rifle or pistol. There are a gazillion different varieties out there! Such as:

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The red dot sights do NOT project a laser dot onto a target. There is a red dot inside the housing of the sight which paints a picture, of sorts, onto the target. You just use it like a scope which has cross hairs. Some red dot sights will magnify the target, others do not. Most do not have the powerful magnification that a very good scope has. After that, it comes down to preference.

Laser sights project a laser beam which paints a red dot on the target itself.

I've seen them mounted on guns in a lot of different ways. This is just one of them.

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And, in the process of looking up some photos, I stumbled on a combo red dot/laser sight that I didn't know existed!

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One major downside to red dots and laser sights is that they are battery powered. You HAVE to remember to shut them off at the end of a target session or your next target session will be ended before you even get to the range. That's no fun if you drove a long way to get there.

Ask Google what the pros and cons are of each. You'll find a lot of reading, I assure you.

But those are the bottom end basics.

Personally, I prefer an unmagnified red dot sight. But that doesn't mean it will work best for you. Take your time and get the right one that works best for you.

--Wag--
 

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Another way is learning to point shoot, just like the cowboys. Takes a lot of practice but your not at the mercy of technology that may not work when you need it most. Your making the gun become an extension of your index finger. Start with a large bulls eye (12-18”) at at about 10’. Draw, point, shoot and do this over and over agin until you can put the entire cylinder or mag in the target. Reduce and do some more. The goal is a 6’ center. This takes a lot of practice but the reward can be life saving. BTW not a lot of ranges will let you do this but it never hurts to ask.
 

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As said above… learning to shoot with the sights that come with gun, and learning to shoot “point and shoot” style are both useful.

if you choose a laser (projects red or green laser onto the target)… here are a few examples from my collection of how they can be affixed to semi-autos or revolvers

FYI, once zeroed, the gun will shoot (impact) wherever the laser dot is pointed… regardless of where you are looking

-on rail below barrel

-affixed to trigger guard

-made as part of the grip

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- as part of the grip on a revolver
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If you choose a “dot sight”… (you must peer into the glass to see the dot… it is not projected)

dot sights ride atop the gun

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you will only see this dot if you hold the pistol correctly while preparing to shoot…. The dot is projected into/onto the glass only and not the target

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note the way the kydex holster is cut to accommodate the dot sight
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hope this helps and enjoy the search and learning

both Lasers and Dot Sights have their place. For me, they increase my accuracy and confidence… but I can still use the sights that are on the guns and can also point and shoot reasonably well
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Another way is learning to point shoot, just like the cowboys. Takes a lot of practice but your not at the mercy of technology that may not work when you need it most. Your making the gun become an extension of your index finger. Start with a large bulls eye (12-18”) at at about 10’. Draw, point, shoot and do this over and over agin until you can put the entire cylinder or mag in the target. Reduce and do some more. The goal is a 6’ center. This takes a lot of practice but the reward can be life saving. BTW not a lot of ranges will let you do this but it never hurts to ask.
Not sure I could become proficient at point shooting without going through $1000 worth of ammo. But I'll definitely give it a try.
 

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Not sure I could become proficient at point shooting without going through $1000 worth of ammo. But I'll definitely give it a try.
Dry fire works great for that. I sit and watch TV and shoot everybody taking head shots. As it works out I have to shoot friendly's too. I'm not sure but that might make me a potential psychopath.

That is a perishable skill and some might say no. I find if I haven't done it in a while it takes a little bit more to get proper sight alignment.
 

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Keep in mind, the laser or the red dot needs to be "zeroed" but once you've done so, it is only good at that range. There's some flexibility but if you zero it at 10 yards, it's likely not going to hit the same spot at 50 yards.

You'll have to experiment with it if you think you need to be proficient at various ranges.

--Wag--
 

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Dry fire works great for that. I sit and watch TV and shoot everybody taking head shots. As it works out I have to shoot friendly's too. I'm not sure but that might make me a potential psychopath.

That is a perishable skill and some might say no. I find if I haven't done it in a while it takes a little bit more to get proper sight alignment.
I found a helper for my dry fire practice,,, these little laser cartridges fire a red laser dot for an instant, every time I pull the trigger (after gun is cocked of course) and I can see it on the wall, or tv, or wherever I’m pointing. Helps me practice point and shoot cheaply. About $75 for an individual cartridge. Comes in several calibers.

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