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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Interesting how many people shoot for years and then one day say, "What is going on with this gun, I can't hit anything!"

If you spend a little time with them you might find that they have forgotten a few of the basics. I have found that people get in a hurry and tend to start wrapping their finger around the trigger and thus pulling the gun off target a small amount as they pull the trigger. They may jerk the trigger in anticipation of the recoil and develop a flinch.

To cure them of this I take them back to the simple 22 revolver. Double action model 34 kit gun. No recoil to speak of and a hard trigger pull on double action and a light one on single action. I instruct time to keep the pad of the tip of the finger on the trigger only when they are ready to shoot. Squeeze the trigger and be surprised when the release comes and the gun fires, for target shooting.

Shoot a few hundred rounds through this 22 and the flinch is gone and the basic skills of breath control, finger control and safe handling techniques are back and then we talk about moving up to the bigger cals.

Have you had similar experiences or can you add to the training technique?
 
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Yes, I've had the same experience.
The next most common mistake is too hard a grip. I've seen grips so tight the end of the barrel is visibly shaking.
I remind that the right grip is a firm handshake, no harder. The hard grip makes the point of impact up and to the left in my case.
 
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It's not because I have a flinching problem, but I try to take my Ruger Mark lll to the range with me at least a couple of times a month just to "change it up."
 
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I'm a firm believer in trigger shoes,when it comes to squeezing off a round.
Magnum mania gave many potentially good shooters a flinch,but they just needed that dinosaur killer.
 

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Iron Maiden
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8,441 Posts
whompuss said:
The next most common mistake is too hard a grip. I've seen grips so tight the end of the barrel is visibly shaking.
I remind that the right grip is a firm handshake, no harder. The hard grip makes the point of impact up and to the left in my case.
I would agree with that! It is something I learnt early on. I was holding the gun so tight, that my shots were all over the place. I thought - the tighter you hold, the straighter the shot! Yeah, right! And that of course lent itself to the dreaded flinch........ As soon as I loosened up on the grip and just allowed my wrists to lock, I had much better luck!!!
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
slugger6 said:
It's not because I have a flinching problem, but I try to take my Ruger Mark lll to the range with me at least a couple of times a month just to "change it up."
I think that the Ruger 22 auto in Mark l, ll , lll or the 22/45 versions is one of the best pistols in the US to work out of a "flinch" issue. Its a heavy pistol so the recoil is practicaly nonexistant and its a sweet little shooter. I always have one with me when I go to the range to use when I get a little shaky from lots of concentration and shooting larger cals.
 

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Chicago Pro-Gun Activist
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2,444 Posts
Have a friend intermix some snapcaps with your regular ammunition, then have that friend watch your shooting and reactions when the snapcap comes up. May be able to tell squeez or jerk, too tight of a grip or possibly a flinch. This should help with trigger control and other problems.
 
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