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I had a LEO friend who really wanted an O/U. At the time Wally world had the Mossberg import in their stores. I looked a it and it pointed ok for me, (what I mean by pointing is that when I throw it up to my shoulder and face, I'm looking straight down the barrel) but he had trouble with that. He bought it anyway thinking it would improve over time but ended up unhappy with it and sold it. When quail jump up in front you, you really don't have a lot of time to adjust your sight picture, same with clays. My son won't shoot anything other than his 870, even with true pairs. Sometimes I think is he faster than the guys with the 3 grand O/U's., at least he gets them watching when he's shooting.
 

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Lighter gauges are so much fun to hunt with. I had 20 ga. 870 and 1100 with their brothers in 12ga. back in my younger years, but only had 12 ga o/u's. This will just be for occasional casual trap or skeet outing. Thanks for the heads up on the safety, but some videos I saw seem like they may have added auto safety recently. Either way not a deal breaker.
And for that purpose, they should do just fine. I shoot a lot of shotgun, typically 12-18k/year. Those giun will not hold up to that type of volume, and since I can't afford a Perazzi, I went with Brownings and Berettas. Even the Beretta semis should go 50K, while Browning and Beretta O/Us will go hundreds of thousand with minor upkeep. So, it comes down to how much you shoot, whether you can depend on what you're shooting to go bang every time, and of course, your budget.
If these guns meet all of those criteria for you, then get some...........My Turkish SxS, the S&W Elite Gold (now the Cabela's Dickinson), is made by AKUS whom many consider to be the best of the current Turkish shotgun makers. It is a wonderful gun, with genuine bone and charcoal color case hardening, rounded action, etc. - perfect for those days afield where miles are many and shots are few. This is not, however, a gun I would take to an Argentina dove hunt where shots number in the thousands before lunch...............just trying to put a little perspective on things.
 

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As much as I’m a fan of Tri Stars I will agree that they won’t last like a Beretta or a Citori but for the average weekend hunter and occasional trap/sporting clays shooter. They should last for years for the average weekender.
 

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When I was choosing a trap gun for my sons I was between a Stevens and the Tri Star. The Stevens had an aluminum receiver and cost slightly more. The Tri Star had a steel receiver and selectable safety and was slightly cheaper.
The steel received on a gun you break open every time its shot is what pushed me in Tri Stars direction.
 
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Well lots of good input, thanks. I'm splitting range time in two different clubs, local for indoor/outdoor rifle & pistol,(they don't have trap or skeet fields) and a Trap club about an hour's drive. So a lot of shooting over 3 venues won't over tax any gun I would say.
 
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