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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am rather new to the gun world. I hadn't shot a "real" gun until I bought my first handgun. All of the people I go shooting with have been around guns all their lives and have taught me everything they know about safety. I have also done tons of reading online about gun safety and all that. Which brings me to my question, should I still take a training class? I don't have to obtain a CCW permit to carry in my state, and if I do decide I want to take a class how to I go about finding a course that I know is supported by the NRA and not just some guy at a range trying to make a quick buck.
 

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Yes, a class would be worth your time. Any class you see advertised, ask if the instructor is NRA certified. Or contact the NRA directly. Hold off on the tactical class type stuff until you are comfortable with your firearm and your skills.

My $.02

CM
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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All of the people I go shooting with have been around guns all their lives and have taught me everything they know about safety.
Not possible. There is always something to learn.
I have also done tons of reading online about gun safety and all that.
Very good. Make this an ongoing thing.
I do decide I want to take a class how to I go about finding a course that I know is supported by the NRA and not just some guy at a range trying to make a quick buck.
A NRA Certified instructor will state that they are certified. Ask.

Should you take a class?

Yes. No one knows everything, especially when it comes to the legal intricacies of carrying (and, God forbid, using) a concealed firearm.
 
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Take a class to learn more about shooting? Absolutely 100% no questions YES!!!!! ( Sorry for shouting. )

Take several, seriously take more than one and if you can arrange it take them in different places with different instructors. The NRA offers dozens of different classes with curriculum compiled by the top minds in the gun world. The people who set the NRA course content are the experts the experts go to when they have a question.

I have been through several of the NRA courses and one or two that were not NRA courses. ( I am planning on getting my NRA instructor certification this year ) Stick with the NRA courses for now. Also I agree with CMonster about starting with the basic safety courses and leave the tactical courses till next year.

Here you will find a scheduled of NRA courses offered near you and what you will need for the classes as well as any prerequisite courses the class may require. The NRA classes are a system of classes. Often before you can take certain advanced classes they require you to have taken basic classes. When I first started taking these classes I thought this was just a way to get more money out of me... It's not. Just trust me on that.

NRAInstructors.org - Portal for NRA certified Instructors, NRA Education and Training

The key to these classes is to use what you paid to learn. You can get tips all day from Tiger Woods but unless you practice what he tells you your not going to be a better golfer. These classes won't make you a better shooter or a safer shooter. Only diligent and disciplined application of the principals discussed can do that. Being a better shooter demands dedication. There is no magic just effort.
 

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I've never taken a class. Been shooting & handloading for 40 years. Carried concealed for 12 years. If you're referring to gun safety, once you make the following two rules a habit, you're already a gun safety "expert."

1. Finger off trigger unless shooting or about to shoot
2. Muzzle never points at anyone or anything you're not willing to destroy

"NRA Certified Instructor??" Nothing more amusing. That simply means another "NRA Certified Instructor" spent a few minutes with him at a range, answered a few questions & firing a few rounds, then gave him a "certificate." Ask me how I know.
 

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I agree with others; a class is a good idea, no matter how much you "know".
 

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I'm an instructor. Certified with the NRA. I'd avoid NRA classes.

Beware the internet, you've received questionable advice already.
 

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Take a class... You Should learn more about your local laws, every state is different and good instructor can tell you the difference between myth and reality. That alone should be all the reason you need.
 

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I'm an instructor. Certified with the NRA. I'd avoid NRA classes.

Beware the internet, you've received questionable advice already.
Why do you say that Jammer? Ive been shooting all my life but wouldn't mine going to a NRA class.
 

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I could tell you stories, but they'd be just that-- stories.

At one of the first places I taught, they taught a straight NRA curriculum. At the next place I taught, they taught a straight Cooper-Gunsite curriculum. To compare two classes, take the Intro classes. (Or whatever title you like. Different ranges used different titles, at least throughout Puget Sound.) The first class someone who has never fired a gun before takes.

In the NRA curriculum, that class is sixteen hours long. Sixteen. Two full days. It includes segments on positions that I've only seen used at that range, in that class, (sitting) and segments that are pure politics-- one in particular, "Why People Own Guns".

In contrast, the next range I taught at taught an entry class that was four hours long, and that included shooting. Different safety rules, which confuses a lot of people. There is no standard.

To quote one of my old instructors, "Sit 'em down. Tell 'em your name. Tell 'em the safety rules. Tell 'em about grip, stance, sight picture, trigger squeeze and follow through. Demonstrate the weapon. After that, why are you still talking? Get 'em on the line, get the weapons in their hands, watch 'em like a hawk, get the rounds downrange, get 'em out the door and let's go to dinner."

There is always an agenda. At an NRA range, that agenda is political indoctrination and NRA recruiting-- some of the classes are like a ponzi scheme without the return for first tier investors. At the second range I mentioned, the agenda was money. At other ranges I've taught at, the entry class included a tour of the gunshop, or a segment about "Gunshop Etiquette" in their gunshop-- those ranges were about getting people to come back, enter the shooting sports and spend money where they first felt comfortable.

Don't get me wrong, I'm an instructor. At one time, I made all my money teaching Intro, Basic and Defensive Handgun. Classes are usually good, and the OP here should absolutely, positively take a class. Skipping the class when you buy a firearm is like buying a car and then heading up an on ramp onto the interstate. If we're lucky, the only people you hurt will be you. If we're not lucky, there's no telling how much damage you could do.

The NRA classes soured me permanently on the NRA as a whole.
 

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Aww take the class. Any small monetary investment will be well worth the material learned and all your questions answered.
 

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Should this question ever arise, the answer will always remain the same. Yes take a class, it's always a good idea, like everyone's already said, you can never learn too much, especially in this particular field. Not to sound like a LibTard, but these things that you and I look at as objects of entertainment, tools, ways to put food on the table, even a defense tool, are in fact very dangerous in the hands of the uneducated, or dim witted. People can be seriously injured with guns that aren't handled properly, and should you ever actually NEED to use it, you want to be able to use it to the absolute best of your ability, and to do this, you need training. In a defense scenario your nerves are going to be screwed, the adrenaline will have you shaking, and you need to act quickly with precision, you need to know when it is necessary to pull that trigger and you need to be able to do that in a way that will both stop the threat and yet be safe at the same time, should you decide to carry a big hand cannon 500 magnum (god knows why...) you need to be fully aware that the bullet will most likely go all the way through and literally destroy anything on the other side, potentially another human being, possibly one that may not even be aware of what's going on. You also need to do this all within the blink of an eye, take into consideration you not only have an attacker, nerves, and adrenaline working against you here, but also time. You have literal seconds to make the decision and you need to get your weapon out as quickly and safely as possible. Example: Glocks have no real external safety, there is a lever on the trigger that prevents firing unless it is pulled, however, should you decide you want to carry a Glock pistol in oh...I don't know, a Blackhawk SERPA holster, there's a finger latch on the holster that keeps the weapon in place until you push the button to release it, conveniently aligned with the trigger. So you go to draw your firearm on an armed attacker who's coming at you and your finger slips because you weren't trained enough in the use of that particular holster and you shoot yourself in your own ass. Not going to look too smart at that particular juncture in your life.

Long story short, take a class brother, you'll benefit. NRA instructors will always tell you that they are certified, all you need to do is ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
My Fiance and I have decided to take a CCW course together some time in the very near future, thanks everyone for all the advice, it is much appreciated!!
 

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You bet and be sure to let us all know how the two of you enjoyed the experience ...be safe.
 

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My experience taking courses with the NRA was essentially the opposite of Jammer Six's. My instructor was polite, competent, knowledgeable, and had no agenda that I could detect; and I was definitely paying attention. After the class I felt confident that I could conduct a class of my own (and have, for 4 years now), and have been incident-free. I guess it depends on the instructor.
 

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Which brings me to my question, should I still take a training class?
For me, yes, you have to take a training class. Because sometimes we thought our knowledge and learning is enough but actually not so we should still be always open to learn new things.
 

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Hi, I teach the firearms classes for the Pima County Parks and Recreation and sometimes the advanced Inter-Agency courses at Ft. Huachuca. Please put you ymoney into courses. We have reduces out prices so that everyone can afford them because the Pima County Board of Supervisors believe that training reduces injuries. They are not pro gun, after my instructors (all cops) convinced them that training reduces injuries. In Phoenix (my son lives there) I will come up or introduce you to instructors who live there.
Please go to massadayoob.com and gatorfarmtactical.com
 
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