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I've been watching videos by GunBlue490. In a few of his videos, he insists that you shouldn't put oil on your guns, that it gunks them up and can ruin them.
 

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He takes a minimalist approach with lubricating firearms which makes sense to me. Some lubricants such as WD-40 are just not a good idea to use and will definitely cause the "gunk" to build up causing problems. Over lubricating in general will cause dust and dirt build up as well. GunBlue490 generally recommends LSA or Ballistol. Personally I use Ballistol as it has been used for many years on firearms with no problems and excellent benefits. Also Ballistol is non-toxic so its safe to use without inhalation concerns or skin damage unlike other lubricants and solvents. Great stuff in my opinion.
 

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<----- BIG fan of Ballistol.

Also, ultimately you should be consulting the owners manual for where and how much to lube not youtube.
 

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RemOil oxidizes and has to be replenished eventually, but it leaves no residue like WD-40 types.

Read gun manuals. Many manufacturers recommend NO OIL on semi-auto moving parts in freezing to sub-freezing conditions. You can damage recoil springs (1911 Government Model) doing that. I've done it ...... twice!
 

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Ballistol is good stuff. Also mixed with water(10-1 i think) it makes a great BP solvent. Lately i seem to be using a lot of G96 CLP. Works real well and smells great too.
 

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I do not know of many guns, mine anyway where absolutely no oil is preferable.
If a machine has metal parts which rub on each other some kind of lubricant is necessary to avoid wear.
It is the amount of oil where most people run into problems. Guns do not have to be dripping wet with oil.
 

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How does oil damage a spring in cold weather? Never heard of a valve spring being damaged cause an engine had oil in it.
 

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Less is better. Oil attracts dirt, which sticks to it, and problems arise. Think, a Q-tip end, dipped in oil, has enough oil on it to lubricate the whole gun. Maybe two. Wipe off any extra. With other Q-tips.
 

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How does oil damage a spring in cold weather? Never heard of a valve spring being damaged cause an engine had oil in it.
You can't generalize everything. apple and oranges or more like apples and apple sauce. A valve spring doesn't run in a channel or rub on a surface like most gun springs. Car engines also get hotter and run with multi viscosity oil.
 

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That does not answer how oil harms a recoil spring.
Speaking of generalizing, some guns run better wet. I have a couple of 15-22s that I shoot in speed steel. If they aren't wet, they won't make it through a match without malfunctions. If they do malfunction, I spray the bolt down and back in action. ARs are the same way. You can plunk with the pretty dry but if you shooting a lot of rounds fast, they need to be wet or at least a good coating and more added after 100-150 rounds. My AR9 starts off a match almost dripping oil. Lucas gun oil seems to stay on best when running a gun wet. Does not fly around Around make a mess.

Now a bolt gun, who cares.
 

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"That does not answer how oil harms a recoil spring."

It happened to me "twice" in winter in Utah with my Colt Government Model Mark IV/Series 80. Almost or at sub- zero temperatures and the gun soaked for about 2 to 3 hours in my holster. Both times I fired the gun and the slide did not return to full battery, remaining about an 1/8 inch from full closed. Slide was also jammed, hard.

Disassembly at home disclosed the slide recoil spring was "severely kinked" and the edge of the spring plug was deformed by the spring wire having overlapped the plug edge and gouged it deeply.

Evidently the "gun oil" at that temperature (freezing and below) can become sticky or glue-like and the spring is stiffer also. When the gun is fired, the slide rebounds at normal force & rate, but the spring and oil throw the spring into a sluggish mode and the firing cycle timing is affected. The spring somehow kinked and deformed the plug edge/lip and jammed up the slide from returning to full battery.

The Government Manual for the 1911 Pistol, near the back and under "Cold Weather Operations" cautions against any oil being applied for use in "Sub-freezing conditions:. I posted this story here over a year back.

Automotive engine valve springs, not to be "confused" with semi-auto pistol recoil springs, are of larger wire-diameter, are shorter overall with considerably fewer coils than pistol recoil springs, and may not be exposed to the cycle time/rate that a pistol recoil spring does.
 

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i am a minimalist when it comes to oil and grease.....
 
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