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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1. wealth or lack thereof: hunting generally is not nearly as cheap as playing a video game for recreation, hunting moose in Alaska is for the rich
2. lack of health or physical condition; this sport is not for couch potatoes or invalids
3. laws and game regs can be intimating or overbearing to some people and some game laws even can be deal-breaker
4. lack of social connections: not knowing people with land to hunt upon
5. lack of access to hunter education and knowledge: not knowing how or where to hunt
6. political climate: many areas in America are anti-hunting
7. hunting is often done with guns and there are many firearms regs to deal with
8. social shame, moral objections in certain communities or families regarding hunting

Consequently, most hunting in America is done by those who have
hunting in the family as a tradition or who live in a hunting community.
Most hunting culture is rooted in rural America.

Those with limited means, who are disabled and/or hail from the city would find this sport most challenging to try to enter.
There is not much incentive to open up hunting to all Americans who want to do it.
 

· Mr.
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People who would let any of that keep them from what I like to do are not any one I'd want to share it with any way. Good riddance.
 
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It's like anything else worthwhile in life. You have to set goals. You have to work hard. You have to be persistent.

If you really like hunting, there's always a way. In the off season, pest species, like Coyote, Wild Boar, wild dogs, and feral cats are available to hunt, year round.
Many states have an unlimited season on these animals. It is your responsibility to know your laws in your state.

If it's important enough to you, you'll be hunting , soon. I know guys who ride a bicycle to work, so they can afford to hunt. They want it so bad, they will literally do without a car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
It's like anything else worthwhile in life. You have to set goals. You have to work hard. You have to be persistent.

If you really like hunting, there's always a way. In the off season, pest species, like Coyote, Wild Boar, wild dogs, and feral cats are available to hunt, year round.
Many states have an unlimited season on these animals. It is your responsibility to know your laws in your state.

If it's important enough to you, you'll be hunting , soon. I know guys who ride a bicycle to work, so they can afford to hunt. They want it so bad, they will literally do without a car.
9. people are unwilling to sacrifice other things, as creature comforts, modern conveniences, favorite foods, etc., in order to hunt - I personally will not give up my computer, home a/c or car in order to have the economic means to hunt - fortunately some people have the stamina to work for a living and ride a bicycle to and from it - I have an interest in hunting but not such a deep passion for it that life will hurt very badly to achieve it

Golf is expensive but it puts no meat on the table and is not nearly as much fun as shooting guns and being in the woods or having the companionship of a nice dog for game birds.

It's true that many things in life have priorities over such recreations as sport hunting. Paying bills, keeping a roof over one's head and a fridge full of groceries.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
People who would let any of that keep them from what I like to do are not any one I'd want to share it with any way. Good riddance.
Sadly, you selfish people need the financial support (gun sales, hunting licenses, deer tags, etc.) from those wannabes who are impeded by health issues, social issues, stupid regulations or whatever. It takes the money from so many hunters to keep the sport alive. Politicians are the single greatest enemy of hunting.

Hunting in America is an endangered species of recreation on the verge of getting on the critical list. A "good riddance" attitude is not helping the cause. The stupid no-hound law for black bear in California put a dent in the sport hunting population for sure.

We need a serious R3 effort otherwise this sport will become extinct likely in your lifetime.

https://www.nssf.org/research/r3/


R3: Recruitment, Retention and Reactivation

NSSF has been working to increase participation in hunting, target shooting and gun ownership for many years. A popular moniker for this work is “R3” which stands for Recruit, Retain and Reactivate. NSSF’s R3 efforts include working with current members, wildlife organizations, NGO’s and federal and state wildlife agencies. We will continually post findings related to our R3 efforts in this section so be sure to check in occasionally. Please share the contents posted here with your staff and if you are interested in learning more about R3 please contact NSSF’s director of research and market development, Jim Curcuruto.

There are an estimated 100 million firearms owners in the US and there are approximately 50 million active participants (hunters/target shooters) on an annual basis. This study was conducted to support efforts to encourage more participation among those firearms owners that are not currently participating. Results show various reasons for lapsed participation such as lack of confidence in handling firearms and they are not sure where to turn for advice and education as they see the industry as unwelcoming. View this webinar to learn more about this important segment and report.

Let me ask this question here: does any person here believe there are enough avid hunters already in America to sustain this sport for future generations? Do we not need more good people from non-hunting backgrounds, even from cities and suburbs, to enter this sport to keep it alive? What kinds of new people should the established hunting fraternity, what remains of it, be trying to attract to this game of pursuing game? Nobody has ever banged on my front door to recruit me into hunting. Lot's of religious solicitors and salesmen, though. Somebody's trying to sell me a brush or save my soul.
 

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The amount of tags, stamps and other fees are truly and a hinderance to hunting. To hunt ducks in NJ you need,
#1. A NJ duck stamp $5.00
#2. HIP # $2.00
#3. NJ hunting license $27.50
#4. A Federal Duck Stamp $25.
#5. A Hunter education card or a license from a previous season in NJ.
on top of all the technical laws and requirements that seem to be there to trip you and cause you fines and further problems.

To Hunt deer in NJ, it gets even more complicated.
 

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john_preston must be an invalid and poor with no income at all and no desire to hunt. If he has a gun he can hunt in many free places and if he has a friend that hunts, he can get a ride to such lands. There are Federal lands in about all 50 States that all is required is a License and possibly a big game Stamp. I don't know about anywhere but N.C.. Yes, I would love to hunt Moose or Kodiak bear, but that is out of my price range of ever achieving. You cannot miss something you have never done before. And most other Americans that hunt. I have had money to burn at one time, but not any longer. Still not old enough to get Social Security $$ but smart enough to still have the money to do what I want, just have to pick and choose the times to do them. Quit work at 58 YO.


As in anything you want or need, you must pay up like the rest as we are not rich and it requires us to work at getting it. ANYTHING worth having is worth WORKING for. It does not necessarily mean physical work. Work smarter not harder.

I have limitations to what I can do so far as going to my Mtn. Cabin and hunting at 3000 feet of elevation. Enfazima(sp) and the love of cigarettes have slowed me down to a slow walk crawl but still go and require riding ATV to stands or huts.

Anyone can do anything if they want too. All it takes is for someone to motivate them. We as parents were responsible for the failure of the raising of our children to do that. I am an exception to that as I have taught all my children and grand children to hunt, shoot , grow a garden and how to preserve the foods they eat and grow or kill. Waste nothing. You kill it, you eat it. You have too much, you share or barter.It teaches many things in life that most will never even have heard of. Meaning of life and death and empathy towards others. Self preservation was and is my one motivation in what life I have left and I have passed it on to my family and now others who wish to try.

My best hunting was **** hunting at night. Mammal Vertebrate Dog Canidae Dog breed



This is how I hunt now as there is not much incentive to work unless someone is there to help.

View attachment 108242

My Mtn. cabin.

House Home Plant community Tree Cottage
 

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People who would let any of that keep them from what I like to do are not any one I'd want to share it with any way.
Good riddance.
I tend to agree. Think John is more interested in naysaying than hunting!

Learning to hunt is a life time process.
If one shows ANY interest in hunting, Then one should START or help another START this process.
Go to or get them to a hunter safety course. My son's girlfriend got her's on line.
It's just not hard at all to GET STARTED!
 

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In Texas hunting is an expensive sport.
I like the idea that most of the land in Texas is in private hands rather than the governments unlike many western states.
But leases are getting very expensive to the average guy.
As in anything else where there is a will, there is a way.
I now hunt every other year to make it more affordable.
 

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My father did not hunt but my oldest brother taught me and my other brothers. My mother was raised in the country and could cook anything we brought home. I stopped hunting in the early 70's after almost being shot while hunting public land. When my son turned 17, I taught him to shoot shotgun (he likes to shoot clay's true pairs with an 870) and we went Pheasant hunting, he's been hooked ever since. This Saturday we will go deer hunting (opening day for gun in Zone B in Florida) and maybe he will get a nice Buck, but more important we will spend some quality time in the woods. We will be hunting on private land. If you want to see weird game laws, Florida's got them. Each WMA has it's own set of rules and dates and most a require lottery draw tag. Private land has a different set of rules. Point being you need to know all of it which I don't mind. As for cost, after you turn 65 in Florida you don't need a license (only a waterfowl stamp if needed). If one of us shoots a deer, it will cost ~.58 cents for the reload and $10.00 in gas for the journey. I typically have most of the deer ground with beef fat added (I keep the loins and some of the back straps), I do a lot with ground venison. Each State presents it's own challengers for hunters, but if you really enjoy it, you will work you way through them and end up having a really great time.
 

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The amount of tags, stamps and other fees are truly and a hinderance to hunting. To hunt ducks in NJ you need,
#1. A NJ duck stamp $5.00
#2. HIP # $2.00
#3. NJ hunting license $27.50
#4. A Federal Duck Stamp $25.
#5. A Hunter education card or a license from a previous season in NJ.
on top of all the technical laws and requirements that seem to be there to trip you and cause you fines and further problems.

To Hunt deer in NJ, it gets even more complicated.
Back the truck up, there's a duck in New Jersey?
 

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In Texas hunting is an expensive sport.
I like the idea that most of the land in Texas is in private hands rather than the governments unlike many western states.
But leases are getting very expensive to the average guy.
As in anything else where there is a will, there is a way.
I now hunt every other year to make it more affordable.
Which is exactly why I prefer the Western states where all one had to do was go. No leases, no food plots, no hunt club memberships; just you, your gun and your determination to succeed.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
John is interested in saying the facts. Some here seem to believe the biggest barrier to hunting is simply in one's own mind. The fact is I personally know nobody who hunts or who owns land to hunt upon. This is Oklahoma, and like Texas, most land is privately held. It used to be owned by the Indians until white man came. I have no mentor for guidance. Nobody in my family hunted. My only access to the sport would be to spend a certain amount cash on a guide but I am strapped with constant bills and rent payments.

The two main ingredients to accessing lawful hunting: knowing certain folks and/or having a certain amount of money dedicated to the sport after living expenses are covered. Yes, one might be tempted to go poach game or trespass without permission, but prepared to suffer the consequences when the man catches you!
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
In Texas hunting is an expensive sport.
I like the idea that most of the land in Texas is in private hands rather than the governments unlike many western states.
But leases are getting very expensive to the average guy.
As in anything else where there is a will, there is a way.
I now hunt every other year to make it more affordable.
Yes, it's called a rich uncle who dies and leaves you fat!

Hunting is reserved for some but not all who want to do it.
Most jurisdictions I know of regard it as a privilege as opposed to a right.
It still is much a thing as it twas in feudal Europe of old: a thing for the monied folk, royalty, nobility and the landed gentry.

These revelations make me feel humble even as an American.
 
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Hunting in NJ is expensive. I’ve brought 5 or more people into the hunting fraternity. The funniest one was this year. I talked my friend Jerry in to going hunting but he was real easy. I took the hunters safety course with him. I didn’t need one but it sucks to go alone. He got a buck his first night in a stand! From there he was hooked. He joined my hunting club.$850. He bought a 20ga OU and a pump 20 ga slug gun. Scope and mounts. Boots, thermal over cat and pants. Upland vest. He’s now kicking himself for not getting the bow course and rifle permit so he can muzzle loader hunt too. We are both at a point where to kids are out on there own and business is real good, (thank you president Trump) so we have time and money. We’re done beating our bodies to feed, clothe and keep everyone else happy.
 

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It takes less than 5 minutes to find places to hunt that cost little or nothing. The Army Corps of Engineers has land for hunters.
First, decide what you want to hunt, how and how far you are willing to go. Then look.
There are shows and videos all over youtube to show you basics of how. You DO NOT need a personal guide or trainer. Most hunting you learn as you go.
A pleasurable hunt does not require killing anything. Some of the best times I have had hunting we did not even see any game.

Last but not not least. Get off your ass!
Whining about what you can't do is nothing but self pity. If you really want it, it is there. Go get it.
If you are waiting for someone to GIVE it to you, well,,,good luck with that.



Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
 

· Live Free
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Never been a wealthy man, but I never had a problem managing to hunt where ever I lived. As a young Airman in the Air Force we had very poor pay back then, and I was raising a family. I still managed to hunt. There were no hunters in my family to teach me, so I had to learn and figure things out. If you want to do something you will figure it out and find a way. Sadly, a lot of folks nowadays would rather whine and complain and insist that someone should make it easier for them, or more affordable or whatever other petty stuff they think to whine about. My family never suffered without so I could hunt, they actually learned the realities of where meat comes from (not all butchered and pre-packaged for your convenience) and that deer, rabbit, squirrel, elk, Turkey, pheasant, quail and even a little rattlesnake were edible, and could be really good if properly handled (processed) and prepared. Oh yeah, a little bear meat from a friend once too.

I have not hunted in a couple years because of some pretty devastating surgeries. I could complain and say that it should be made easier for me because I am handicapped, but I choose to exercise my body into better health so that I can resume hunting again. I already tossed my handicap parking placard...I do not wish to be babied. However, I personally know of a few people who are quite handicapped and cannot work out to regain form because of loss of limbs etc and they hunt via some very friendly laws allowing special permission for them in their states.

I don’t figure to ever hunt moose in Alaska, but I have hunted Elk in New Mexico. Living in Iowa as I do now, all the land is farm land with little exception. But there are some great folks (many) here who allow me to hunt their land, it is not impossible!

Are there fees and laws to negotiate to make sure you doing things legally? Sure! There are a lot of laws to know about operating a motor vehicle too, and expenses.

I am going to hunt and grow a garden for food as long as I am physically able; I have yet to see any hurdles so big that I could not manage pretty well. I guess I see it pretty simple; you can do stuff or you can complain about stuff. I prefer doing.
 
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