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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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DAVID SOLWAY
SEP 06, 2020


Turning on the TV the other night for my ailing mother-in-law, a devotee of the Vancouver Canucks hockey team, we were pummeled by the public address announcer’s sanctimonious spiel about Black Lives Matter, the social sickness of “systemic racism,” and how these issues were “bigger than the game.” Some of the players were featured delivering solemn, not-entirely lucid homilies about justice for the oppressed and the need for brotherhood among the races. One could sense Saint Kaepernick kneeling in the background.

I must say I did not appreciate being enlightened by an announcer reading a script he’d been provided by a cadre of sycophantic officials or lectured by a platoon of semi-literate multi-millionaires who had just presumably discovered they had a social conscience. They were being paid, I’d assumed, to play the game of hockey and entertain their fans, not preach like Savonarola to the sinful multitudes. Recovering from a serious operation, my mother-in-law needed something to distract her, and her revered Canucks served the purpose. But I swore off hockey from that moment forward since it wasn’t hockey anymore, it was politics. Would others feel the same way about football or basketball or baseball?

The abandonment of the game was by no means a tragedy but it was a kind of sacrifice. I have always been, like a good Canadian, passionate about hockey. Raised in a small town in snowy northern Quebec, I was ardent about the game to the point of infatuation. Indeed, so devoted was I that I sacrificed my bar mitzvah studies to the sacred art and devotional practice of tending goal for our local teams. In later years I followed the seasonal exploits of my beloved Montreal Canadiens, suffering deep depression when they began regularly missing the playoffs, sympathizing with puck-peppered Carey Price, and contenting myself by hurling fiery imprecations at brain-dead management.

Sports is a way of shutting out the world of everyday concerns, of boredom on the job, the usual money worries, and the various tribulations that come with ordinary life. Sports creates an autonomous world with its own rules and pleasures and functions as a necessary distraction from the complex and insoluble world “out there.” It was never meant to be corrupted by the politics of the day, as is now the case. Commenting on the televised NFL draft, author Jeff Reynolds says “it was nice to have a little bit of football back while we’re still under quarantine.” American Thinker blogger Bill Hansmann sits in his den, “staring at autographed baseballs,” and wants “to hear the crack of the bat.” Didn’t I want to hear the thwack of stick against puck and see the net bulge and the red light go on?

I recall some of the greats of a bygone era, the Detroit Red Wings’ Gordie Howe (Mr. Hockey) or his close friend, the Montreal Canadiens’ Jean Béliveau (Le Gros Bill), who off the ice were intelligent observers of life, true gentlemen, and respected ambassadors for the game they played with such love and dedication. I cannot imagine them succumbing to the ideological fads and idiocies of the day, mouthing half-baked platitudes about “systemic racism” and “social justice,” or hobnobbing with anarchists and firebrands. They played hockey, not politics, and in retirement comported themselves with dignity. Today’s athletes, earning in one year what most of us earn in a lifetime—if we’re lucky—are in no position to complain about their treatment by society at large and are under no compulsion to become pious champions for movements they do not really comprehend or self-proclaimed victims of inequities from which they do not suffer.

What they cannot be forgiven is that they have destroyed sports and deserve the only kind of retribution they might understand: rejection by their paying fans. When the regular season is renewed, stadiums and arenas should empty out. Financially obscene contracts should not be worth the paper they’re written on. Let these new evangelists rather march in protests and demonstrations to show they really believe in the clichés they so readily spout. If true to their word, let them spend their time with shills, camp followers, and agents of manufactured outrage learning the rhetoric of envy and resentment. Otherwise, let them do an honest day’s work in a demanding world they have managed to elude. Let them wonder what to do with the rest of their lives, until sanity may providentially return to the sports world. Only then would it be time to hear the crack of a bat or ponder the NFL draft or watch Carey’s lightspeed glove snag a sure goal from a head-shaking attacker.




 

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Jesus Saves
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Sports, as we have known, has been dying a slow death but the recent actions have severed arteries. There is no going back, IMO. The million dollar pedastil ornaments are too stupid to realize they are being used. Their egos too large to realize they are meaningless beyond the arena. They are puppets.

I also believe college sports will have a similar experience. All those jocks who have been given a free ride to an education will fail once the funding stops. Who they really are will be defined by their abilities beyond the sport; and many will fail.

Can they survive? Not as they once did. It's now up to the sheeple.
 

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Live Free
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Sports, as we have known, has been dying a slow death but the recent actions have severed arteries. There is no going back, IMO. The million dollar pedastil ornaments are too stupid to realize they are being used. Their egos too large to realize they are meaningless beyond the arena. They are puppets.

I also believe college sports will have a similar experience. All those jocks who have been given a free ride to an education will fail once the funding stops. Who they really are will be defined by their abilities beyond the sport; and many will fail.

Can they survive? Not as they once did. It's now up to the sheeple.
While I feel much the same as you, I differ in that I do think pro sports can and will survive because there are enough people practically salivating over their return. The political nonsense and lecturing from their favorites will actually enhance the draw for some because their heroes are not only displaying their physical abilities, but spewing the same liberal dogma; they will see them as even greater because of their wisdom and thoughtfulness in the sociopolitical arena too! This is a sad view I am suggesting, but I think it is true. People have been idolizing jocks and their teams for a long time; for them, this will just enhance the draw. I think college sports will likewise survive because people just gotta have their teams, especially in rural communities where college teams are more of the focus (even high school). The reality is that the Romans just gotta have their arena (coliseum).
And...we must not forget the money! There is a boatload of money to be made in that business, they will not give it up easily.
 

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We’re Rangers fans here. We’ve been to lots of games and even in a sky box A few times. We are big college football fans. Clemson, West Virginia fans for sure. Being in No, we watch the Giants and Jets. We watch every women’s soccer game and even go to them too. No much for baseball. Except for the college sports, they can all kiss my ass now. If the colleges jump on the bandwagon, bye bye too! I have other ways of entertaining myself. Maybe I’ll go hunting more.
 

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Grand Imperial Poobah
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Professional sports may survive, but it will be at a lower level than before. People have stopped attending games and watching on TV. Advertisers know this, and will be less willing to shell out the big bucks to promote their wares when the audiences are substantially less in size. Less money from advertising means less profit for the teams, and less money for the coaches and players.

Additionally, communities will be less likely to offer tax breaks and build stadiums for teams, like they have done in the past.

Professional players have shot themselves in the foot, and we are waiting for them to bleed out.
 
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Keep calm & return fire!
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Whats sports is/does has little bearing on me personally. I have never been a sports fan. Its simply not my thing so I can't boycott it because I never tuned in to begin with. Sports turns me off to a degree and its not so much the game as much as it is the fans. I listen to some sports fan talk like they have a financial stake in the team or if the coaching staff would just listen to them then everything would be different. I just roll my eyes. You don't have a dime in the team other than the merch. you overpaid for and the front office doesn't give a flying puck what you think.

I also think athlete are WAY, WAY overpaid for what they do.
Just my personal take but I wouldn't be bothered one bit if professional sports disappeared completely. (I might miss professional Hockey just a little tiny bit)

However, I am a huge fan of youth sports. I credit travel ice hockey with being a huge factor in both my boys staying active and out of trouble. I'm sure many other parents feel the same way about their kids chosen sports.
 

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Gave up on MLB back in 1967, the NFL in 1989, never watched NHL or the NBA. Guess I was ahead of the times.
 

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American "professional jock-sniffers" have finally violated the "Prime Directive" of televised/sponsored sports: "Thou shall not sh#t in thine own mess-kit".

But they did .............. Reduced revenues, salaries and perk's to follow.
 

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AZHerper
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PGA golf, especially without fans, is fun to watch and the players act like gentlemen and treat everyone with respect. Even if you aren't a golf fan it's hard to find a sport without an agenda. I was a quarterback for the University of Utah and my father was a pro football player for the American football league which was basically killed by competition with the NFL in 1934. Anyway my whole family have been sports nuts for decades but not anymore. I'm through with the NFL, the NBA, Major league baseball, and NASCAR. That just leaves me with soccer and golf and most of our Arizona soccer team (Phoenix Rising) are not American. So...I watch golf.
 

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Keep calm & return fire!
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I agree... I do like to watch the majors. Its been years since I played a round of golf but I completely agree... Its a gentlemans sport.
 
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I always thought spectator sports, especially professional sports, was a complete waste of time. I'm glad the rest of the world is catching up with me.

It really helps if you think of sports as something you do, not something you watch.
 

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"I'm glad the rest of the world is catching up with me."

I don't think "you" are the one the world is trying to play catch-up with, but I can only really speak for myself.

"It really helps if you think of sports as something you do, not something you watch."

How does one "do" the Indy 500 or the Olympics?

I always thought spectator sports, especially professional sports, was a complete waste of time.

I was 12 years old when I saw the broadcast in 1959 of the first televised NFL Championship game between the Baltimore Colts (John Unitas QB, Ray Berry Split End) and the New York Giants (Charlie Connerly QB, Sam Huff LB). Hardly a waste of time.

Spectator sports would have never achieved the size, popularity and become the TV broadcast and live venue revenue generator it is by being a complete waste of time. But there is a limit to "popularity" of the spectacle, and I think some athlete's antics have pushed it over that limit.
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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Discussion Starter #15
Sports is a way of shutting out the world of everyday concerns, of boredom on the job, the usual money worries, and the various tribulations that come with ordinary life. Sports creates an autonomous world with its own rules and pleasures and functions as a necessary distraction from the complex and insoluble world “out there.”
 

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When pro sports thinks the fans are not important anymore is when they lost me.
It is all about corporate sponsors and endorsements.
But i do wonder if the TV networks will be able to charge the teams all that big money to televise games if the viewership is way down.
 

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It's the NFL who charges the networks to broadcast the games. And we - the viewers - pay for ll that advertising which is contained in the product costs.
 

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I played football in high school, but never followed it after that. I did watch basketball for a couple years, but was never really a big fan. Everything going on in sports right now hasn't affected me one bit.
 

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Jesus Saves
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I did not watch it, but they had a NFL special on last night about how the NFL positively influences the communities.... or something like that.

Sickening. They are trying to brainwash the people!


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