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By Parker Beauregard


It was recently reported that Patrissa Cullors, a founding woman of Black Lives Matter, was signed by Warner Brothers to a multiyear deal across all of its programming platforms that “encompasses scripted and unscripted series, longform series, animated and kids programming, as well as digital content.”

In a statement released by Cullors after the signing, she mentioned that a reason for celebration is that “Black voices, especially Black voices who have been historically marginalized, are important and integral to today’s storytelling.”

Historically, yes. Contemporarily, no. (This begs the question: Why are most examples of oppression from the past?)

Log onto any Hulu account and a unique feed called Black Stories will populate one of the scrolls
. A similar feature appears in Amazon’s Prime Video feed, with a scroll for Black Voices presenting a bevy of black-produced, black-directed, and black-acted shows and films. Netflix also cut right to the chase; they had an entire genre created for Black Lives Matter. If black voices are absent or underrepresented in the media, it is hard to tell by looking at every major media presence.

Cullors’ signing is reminiscent of a similar deal between Disney and former NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick. In early July, the former signed a deal with the latter in which he “will see his projects distributed across all Disney platforms which include ESPN, Hulu, The Undefeated, Pixar, and The Walt Disney Co.”
Like Cullors, Kaepernick expressed that he was excited to “elevate Black and Brown directors, creators, storytellers, and producers, and to inspire the youth with compelling and authentic perspectives.” Apparently, he had not yet seen the scroll feeds on his Netflix account at the time of making that statement.

Also this summer, Beyonce reportedly inked a deal with Disney to produce three films to the tune of $100 million.

According to Wikipedia, the first of the three, Black is King, tells the story of a “prince's journey of self-discovery... as an allegory for the African diaspora's journey of self-discovery, with the film acting as a clarion call to the diaspora to reclaim their identity through black pride.” It was released this past summer. Despite the fact that Black Lives Matter (of which Beyonce is an ardent supporter) rejects the practice of capitalism, she and the all-black cast of the film appear to have no qualms discovering their pride profiting off the black victim narrative and thriving off a free market venture.



And who could forget Barack and Michelle’s lucrative contract with Netflix? Their multi-year deal is reportedly worth upwards of $50 million. The Obamas will not be hurting for cash anytime soon after also landing a $65 million book deal.

While many leading black leftists are cashing their checks and the world’s largest streaming platforms are elevating countless black voices, not all black perspectives are prospering. Cullors laments that black voices are not being heard properly; one wonders if she actually means it the way she’s saying it.

Larry Elder produced a fantastic documentary titled Uncle Tom that simply asks why blacks are expected to think and vote monolithically on issues critical to the black community. It has been roundly ignored by the media since its release. Sure, it can be viewed as a rental on places like YouTube or directly from Salem Radio’s website, but in terms of equity of distribution, there is a sizable market loss when not accessed through a paid subscription service.

Likewise, it has become known that Shelby Steele, the independent black thinker, had a project titled What Killed Michael Brown? that was rejected by Amazon streaming services. As the title suggests, this film explores the history and facts of the infamous Ferguson incident that ushered in a reinvigorated narrative of police-on-black brutality and murder. For simply asking a question that runs counter to a prevailing (and acceptable) viewpoint, his material is effectively censored.

There is then the disparity of documentary treatment toward the most senior member of the U.S. Supreme Court, Clarence Thomas. Thomas is routinely ignored as a prominent and inspiring black voice. Despite being just the second black justice in this history of the Supreme Court, he was omitted from an ostensible Supreme Court exhibit in the African-American History Museum that focused solely on Thurgood Marshall, the only other black justice in the court’s lengthy history. This is the same history “museum” that rolled out an exhibit on whiteness, condemning traits and practices like hard work, the scientific method, equality under the law, using reason and logic, and expressing oneself politely and appropriately.

Admittedly, there might be a legitimate explanation for the availability of a 2020 documentary titled Created Equal about the famously reserved Thomas. While this expose appeared briefly on PBS - for a one-night special - and can now be rented for $29.99 for a single in-house viewing, a 2018 documentary titled RBG was not only made available on multiple streaming services, including Hulu and Amazon Prime Video (Netflix has a second Ginsberg documentary currently on its platform as well), it was nominated for an Oscar in the category of Best Documentary.

What is one to make of this? Despite Cullors, Kaepernick, Beyonce, and the Obamas all bemoaning the lack of black voices, what is blatantly transpiring hardly seems like an issue of melanin. Black voices, despite being just 13% of the general American population, feel omnipresent. It is a shame that Asians and Hispanics, who together comprise 25% of the American population, are underrepresented so drastically. Their stories are at least equally compelling. Moreover, whereas one group of prominent voices in the grievance industry are profiting on their black fame, equally prominent voices are being silenced for having the audacity to peddle in free thinking and pushing the boundaries.

Television, media, and celebrityhood do not have a black problem. They have a conservative problem.

Parker Beauregard writes cultural commentary from a lens of traditional American values. He has been published on American Thinker, Human Events, and other pro-America sites. He blogs at www.thelastbesthope.xyz. Contact him at [email protected].


 

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BLM = Burn, Loot, and Murder.

No thanks.

BTW- For the first time in my life of buying tires (over 4o years), I am purchasing non-Goodyear brand tires. Yeah, I know, it won't matter for them as far as my $500 or so every two years, but it's a big thing for me personally as to date I have had I've had four motorcycles (1 street and 3 dirt bikes), and over a half dozen vehicles, which all were on Goodyear tires, up to now.

Never again Good year. Never again.

I can get along without supporting Wanrer Bros. too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I make sure my athletic shoes are either New Balance or Sketchers and definitely not Nike!

I bought this book on Kindle a couple of months back at the same time I made a couple of other book purchases. I forgot about this book as it "downloaded" and just discovered it on my Kindle a week ago.

The Race Grievance Industry (RGI) is worse than despicable and obscene. But the Leftists and Elites support it through tons of White Guilt and the hubris of self-congratulatory feelings. Their money and contributions from George Soros "Tides Foundation" and other organizations he created, account for $Millions being funneled now into the RGI.

Black Lies Matter: Why Lies Matter to the Race Grievance Industry

by Taleeb Starkes, Gavin McInnes (Foreword)
4.13 · Rating details · 399 ratings · 56 reviews
In Chicago a.k.a “Chiraq," the first ten days of 2016 yielded 120 people shot. Baltimore’s 2015 ended as its bloodiest and deadliest year — on a per-capita basis. In 2014, Detroit’s police chief called upon law-abiding citizens to take arms against its burgeoning, violent, criminal subculture.

Unfortunately, these cities aren’t anomalies. Year after year, a seemingly unshakable reality of violence plagues black communities nationwide.

In fact, since 1980, blacks have routinely accounted for almost half of America’s annual homicide victims, and more than half of the perpetrators — all while being a minor thirteen percent of the national populace.

Yet, a certain black-based industry — which specializes in nurturing comfortable lies while burying uncomfortable truths — propagates a notion that “racism” is the foremost issue facing black Americans, and white cops are blood-thirsty enforcers.


Moreover, this cunning, race-peddling entity knows that it's easier to lie to blacks than to convince blacks that they've been lied to.

Thus, black "lies" are good for business... black "lives" are good for nothing (except exploitation).

And presently, business is booming.
 

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Vigilant Curmudgeon
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My only concern. ...

DARK
BLACK
MATTER
LIVES

in this whole understanding of the Cosmos !

And F' .... The piss ants that are making the big STINK.
 

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A very strange contract of the BLM movement with Warner bros, and I don't even know why they signed it. I am not racist, and I am completely fine with the black population of our planet. However, I have an assumption that the BLM movement is just trying to hype on the situation that has occurred and make money on it. Now everyone is indulging them and that's why they use it and try to make money on it in every possible way. Recently I saw a documentary on rooomba.tv about the dark-skinned population of our planet. This film talked about their good qualities. However, skin color and race are not important, because anyone can be hypocritical and I believe that the BLM movement is hypocritical and tries to profit from the death of their people.
 

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Grand Imperial Poobah
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I don't care what color you are, as so long as, you obey the law, take care of your family, pay your bills, mow your grass, and return whatever tools you borrow.

I, nor any ancestors of mine, have never owned a slave. I did have ancestors that fought on the Union side, to end slavery.

With all of that said, I watch TV and movies to be entertained, not preached too. I attend church to be preached too.
 

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Salmon Slayer
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I never owned slaves,
You never picked cotton!
African chiefs sold slaves.
 
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Some of my ancestors owned slaves, most didn't. Some of my ancestors were slaves. Does that mean I owe myself reparations?
Hmmm, Possibly, I would suggest buying a new gun for yourself to make amends.
 
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