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My first gun i ever got was a Remington 58 that has seen about 40 years of on and off use from me was showing some serious bumps and bruises in the stock. I like wood working but I'm more into building dressers, entertainment centers and such and not much into small detail, hand fitting and shaping. Anyway i had to fix a couple of cracks at the receiver with dowels, fill the but pad holes with dowel sand re drill those as they were worn out, steamed a few dents best i could and repaired a large chip that has been missing for years. Sanded it, lightly stained it and rubbed in some tru oil. Came out ok but not as i hoped which is usually the case. I wish i had the talents of a couple of guys i see post their work on here!! I didn't think to take before pics but the old wood had seen some use for sure. Oh and i put a new butt pad on it too. Just did it by eye being i don't have a jig. Not the easiest thing in the world to do. Still have to finish it and sand off the thin stringy pieces.

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Looking good.:thumbsup:
 

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Looking pretty good so far. What level of gloss are you looking to have in the finished work?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Looking pretty good so far. What level of gloss are you looking to have in the finished work?
That's as far as I'm going. I think that was 4 coats.
 

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Heck Yeah SAVE IT...Steam works real well at removing dings and dimples day to day stuff. After a good strip. Did some for my kids Marlin 25 and a Glen-field 60 grant it they wanted "COLOR" Hers Pink and Him UK Wild Kat's Blue/White.
 

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The reason I asked is because if you wanted to level of protection you have but with less shine you can rub it with rotten stone to soften the shine. It’s really micro fine stone dust that will keep the finish but make it look less shiny. You mix it with mineral oil and rub the finish. It’s all in what you want it to be. Keep up the good work.
 

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Looks great. You remembered to make all the repairs blind from the inside. I didn't see what brand of wood finish you used on the stock. Just let the finish cure for a week or so, especially if you are getting a lot of moisture in your neighborhood. BUT If you want to dull the gloss you can do it with 600 grit wet, and dry paper and art linseed oil. Don't scrub just light buffing with paper on your fingers. :thumbsup: Be careful this is how I caught the bug 50 yrs ago. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks great. You remembered to make all the repairs blind from the inside. I didn't see what brand of wood finish you used on the stock. Just let the finish cure for a week or so, especially if you are getting a lot of moisture in your neighborhood. BUT If you want to dull the gloss you can do it with 600 grit wet, and dry paper and art linseed oil. Don't scrub just light buffing with paper on your fingers. :thumbsup: Be careful this is how I caught the bug 50 yrs ago. :lol:

I watched a video on youtube from midway with Larry Potterfield showing some stock repair so i figured i would try it on this old girl. Thats where i seen the dowel trick otherwise i probably would have just tried straight gluing it. I just used some mahogany minwax gel stain i had, sanded it on and rubbed the majority off which only made it very slightly darker. I did each coat of tru oil on a different day as the basement it cool right now, about 55 degrees and used some 000 steel wool between coats and left the last one glossy. Where i fixed the large chip i just glued a block on and used a chisel to shape it down, then a file and sand paper. I was surprised how it came out(wish i could have matched the wood better though) as my chisel skills and chisel sharpening skills are novice at best. Most of my wood working is with oak and oak and chisels don't get along to well but this stuff shaved off pretty nicely. Also getting the dings and dents out. Some steamed out, some partially and others i had to sand but i didn't want to go crazy so there are still some bumps and bruises. I really wish i had some checkering tools and the know how as it's mostly flattened out with 50-60 years of use but i'll live with that. I did the fore end too but that just needed to be stripped and finished, thankfully no repairs. All in all i think the butt pad was the hardest part, trying to keep the stock lines without any type of jig and not going to far etc was quite the royal pain in the rear.
 

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You need a checkering cradle. You an often find them on ebay or second hand stores. Hell, if I hadn't given mine away ten years ago I would give you mine, with the checkering tools to boot. Yep, I really do dislike checkering that much. :yikes1:
 
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