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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As my first post, I'd like to introduce myself. My name's Matt and I'm 17. I have just received an older model 15 rifle, made by J. Stevens Arms Company, from my grandma. It was my great great grandpa's and it's been handed down as the years have gone on. I dont know a whole lot about guns, but know almost enough to make it sound like I know what I'm talking about. I know its a single shot bolt action, but with no bullets in the chamber, should it make a click when I pull the trigger? I can cock it and nothing will happen after i dry fire. I do not have any bullets and do not plan to really ever shoot it because it is a family heirloom. I was just wondering if it's supposed to click or anything when dry fired.

Thanks
Matt
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
Hey Matt, welcome to the forum!

A .22 rimfire shouldn't be dry fired. If you want to check out the trigger squeeze, you can put an empty case in the chamber and turn it so that the original firing pin indentation is away from the firing pin. If there is still no click, there is likely something wrong with the rifle. But like you said, it's an heirloom, not for shooting, anyway.

Have fun, look around and ask whatever you want. There's a whole lot of knowledge and experience here at NGF.

KYPD,

~Rick
a/k/a "The Gunrunner"
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Actually, after a little force, I got the hammer like part to pull straight back to fire. It's been a few years(like 30) since its been oiled and fired. My dad wants to oil it up before too much longer. I'm really starting to like these boards.

Thanks for that Gunrnr

Mattmcoop
 

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You might want to soak the bolt in a penetrating-type oil. Might help the trigger assy as well and swab some into the bore and leave it there a while. I had a really old S&W Pre-Mod 10 brought in a while ago, that the cylinder wouldn't even turn. Owner thought it was rusted solid. 24 hours with a little WD40 did the trick. It had what looked like it's original lubrication from the factory all dried/gummed up in place. Cleaned up the residual gunk with "Ed's Red" and it was good as new (actually it was BETTER, since it's a REAL S&W, not the CNC wannabees coming out of the factory now!).
 

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Matt,
Your rifle, like many of the single shot bolt actions, of the 1920 through 1950's, does not cock when the bolt is worked - you have to manually pull back on the "cocking piece" which is that rounded extension on the back of the bolt - that you discovered will pull back and stay back. Pulling the trigger when that piece is "cocked" will fire the chambered round.
As said before, you DO NOT want to dry fire a .22 rimfire - you'll either pean over or break the firing pin/striker or leave divits in the chamber face - eventually you will do enough damage that it cannot fire.
WELCOME to the forum and to the wonderful world of firearms. Shoot safely.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, I wont dry fire it anymore then. And I doubt I will ever shoot this gun, or at least not quite for some time.

Another thing. Do I need a permit or anything? It probably wont ever leave my house, but do I still need one.

Thanks
 
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