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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys just curious what you think about keeping your bedside handgun/personal carry/duty firearm loaded and if spring wear and on the magazine ever crosses your mind. I know some people that don't like to keep their handgun magazines fully loaded but rather keep it at half to keep the spring in good condition. My thought is, I need to keep my handgun fully loaded, magazines are replaceable but a life isn't. Then again you shouldn't need to unload a whole magazine on some one,you just need to have good shot placement. I sometimes rotate my magazines once a month to keep the spring in decent condition. Just curious what your guys tactics are and opinions. Sorry if I'm bringing up an old conversation, I'm new!
 

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From an old article in Handgunner Magazine....

The magazine spring myth has been around for many years and is growing in popularity. It goes something like this: "You should unload your magazines when they're not in use or the spring will weaken causing failures to feed." This has gone as far as shooting competitors actually unloading their magazines between stages to extend the life of their springs. A variant of this myth is: "You should never load a magazine to capacity and should always leave it one round short." What if you need that round some day?

Recently, I read an article in a gun magazine suggesting you rotate your magazines so the ones not in use can "recover and rest." The same author uses the phrase "spring-set" to describe weakness of a spring because it was compressed for a long time. Hogwash. There's nothing further from the truth. Springs don't care how long they're compressed and don't require rest, recreation or even a vacation from time to time.

Shameful Spring Benders

To put this one to rest, you have to understand creep. Creep is the slow flow of a non-ferric metal like copper, brass and lead under force. At temperatures outside of a furnace, steel doesn't have any appreciable creep. Under most conditions, steel flexes and then returns to its original shape. When pushed past its elastic limit, steel will bend and not return to its original shape. All designers of well-made magazines make sure the spring never approaches the elastic limit when the magazine is fully loaded. Honest. This means the spring will not weaken when the magazine is fully loaded -- not even over an extended time. Like 50 years. American Handgunner recently ran a story about a magazine full of .45 ACP that had been sitting since WWII and it ran just fine on the first try. So there you go.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Jay, I'm glad you were able to explain it to me. It used to be a concern for me but no matter what I always kept my handgun fully loaded. Like what was stated, what if I need that one extra round someday. I always keep my Glock fully loaded and a magazine for my rifle fully loaded. Just curious, have you noticed any increase in price of ammo in Indiana?
 

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I know I have here in the south part. Most handgun ammo has gone up, you can`t find .223/5.56, but the common rifle rounds such as 30/30, 30-06, .243, .270, .300 win mag, etc; have remained plentiful and stable price wise.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Seems to be same here, lucky for me my main rifle round is .270. Which I have been hoarding along with handgun ammo. I need to check the price of ammo in Oregon and keep an eye on it. I've heard that it is even getting hard to try and reload yourself and that it is hard to find primers.
 

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Just curious, have you noticed any increase in price of ammo in Indiana?
I honestly can't answer that. I reload everything I shoot, and I'm not familiar with current retail prices for loaded ammunition.
 

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for me, not locally, but that can vary widely from area to area.
 

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I keep a loaded gun on my nightstand every night. They're not much good if they're empty. I have never worried about magazine problems.

In Iraq we would get cases of loaded M-4 and glock 19 magazines flown in to us. We almost never used it, we brought in supplies of mags with us and had more ammo than we could use. As a result we would occasionally dig a case of mags out of a conex that had been sitting there for 4-5 years. Anytime we took these out they would work fine. When I was a kid I bought a WW2 take home 1911 from one of our neighbors. He had had it for over 20 years without using it, just wiped it down with an oily rag once in a while. He had six loaded mags he had brought home with the gun - he gave them to me. All mags worked with no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I keep a loaded glock on my night stand aswell along with 2 rifles loaded on standby in the closet. I'm prepared for the worst, just my mentality. Good to know I can scratch off the worry of spring compression and failure feed.

Pretty impressive how durable metals can be. You must have bought that 1911 for a fairly reasonable price I'm guessing? That's a really neat peice of history. Any pictures?
 

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Spring wear on a loaded magazine is a fallacy. Just simply listen to what you're asking. How is your spring gonna wear out in your loaded mag? The first time you load your mag to full capacity, it's going to compress the spring to the max it will ever be. I used to keep some informative links close at hand. I could still find them if need be.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It was just something that I have always heard, thinking that if you fully load your magazine you will keep the spring compressed and over time the spring will wear. Glad it's a myth, one less thing i have to worry about when my life is on the line or others.
 

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It was just something that I have always heard, thinking that if you fully load your magazine you will keep the spring compressed and over time the spring will wear. Glad it's a myth, one less thing i have to worry about when my life is on the line or others.
Plenty of things we hear wear on the mind more than ammo does on a fully loaded magazine spring. Sometimes we are our own worst enemy. Personally........I don't have much faith in humanity.
 

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Even gun folks aren't born with magazine spring knowledge. We all had to learn, both by asking questions, and through experience.... as it should be.
 
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.Magazine springs don't wear out. People worry that by being compressed they will retain that shape. Not so, same as in trap springs. I've picked up bargins from people who left the springs compressed and thought they would need replaced.
 

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well........some notions and perhaps some practices will lend themselves to the argument.

often times with some particular new magazines, we face some difficulty in loading them to full capacity and blame it on the mags being "new".....then over time they seem to become easier to load. Now that could be just becoming accustomed to it, more finger strength, or the mag springs "loosening up"......either way, that could as well promote the notion....an illusion that the mag springs just ain't as tight as they use to be......as in loosing tension.

Then there is another one that i also practiced, and that was with the browning hi power and loading only 12 rds in the magazine instead of 13. This was one practice that appears to had been followed by quite a few folks. Even read numerous times the brits in the SAS followed this same practice. Now whether it was for reliable feeding purposes or stress on the springs......that was often debated. Either way, such also lead to the notion about "tired" springs. i have also heard similar arguments concerning the m16 magazines and better function if they are down-loaded a round or two.....

i have had instructors back in the dark ages during the transition from revolvers to autos telling us to rotate the mags.........to this day i still do with the pistol and with the m16.... Wrong or right, i figure it don't hurt.....And the m16 also seems to function better with the mag downloaded to 19 rounds instead of 20.........yes, i prefer the smaller mags over the now standard "30".

besides, having a few xtra mags can't hurt.

such probable myths do persist.......the old training probably does not help either.........think i will just cling to my revolvers and try to avoid the argument........
 

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i have also heard similar arguments concerning the m16 magazines and better function if they are down-loaded a round or two.....
VietNam. 1960s. M16. 20 round magazines were prone to jamming if loaded to 20 rounds. Considerably fewer jams if downloaded to 18 rounds. True fact.

Constant copmpression does not wear a spring. Its the compression/relaxation cycle that, over time, wears springs
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Glad to know that others had the same mindset. I did rotate my mags aswell but always kept them fully loaded. Everyone is entitled to there own opinion. Wether you rotate them or truly trust your magazines,if the tactic works for you then awesome. Stick with it. We're on the same level deputy!
 
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