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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought my first rifle I can actually own. It's a savage 30-06 xp hunter or whatever. I took it out to the range today and just used standard 150 grain cartridges but man oh man it hit my shoulder like nothing before. I have shot many rifles and shotguns alike from 300 win mag to 12 gauge buckshot, but this was intense! Am I not doing something right? What's the problem? I really love the gun and want to shoot it but my shoulder is killing me. Now I can handle the kick but is there anything I can do to make it a little easier? The recoil is fine but not a gun I'd like to use regularly.
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Make sure the butt is firmly on your shoulder. A mistake I've seen people make is anticipating the recoil & holding the rifle slightly away from their shoulder - which makes it worse by allowing the gun to get a running start & hit their shoulder instead of pushing it. A lighter-weight rifle will recoil more. Also, the recoil pad can't be too soft or too hard.

Some ammo companies make reduced recoil loads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah thats true. I probably anticipated the shot coming and moved a little too fast, even then I might need to get another recoil bad as to this one on here is less than or right at an inch. Then again, 30 rounds out of any rifle you might be feeling the same thing.
 

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If you've shot a 300 Win Mag with no ill effects and that 30-06 is whuppin ya then it's probably form that's making the difference. Looks like you're using my favorite rest (sack of corn) so just settle in behind the stock, rest your cheek comfortably against the side of the stock, let your left hand pull the rifle back into your shoulder (sometimes I lay my hand over the top of the barrel at the for end) and grip the wrist with three fingers of your right hand leaving your index finger and thumb free. I don't grip with my thumb, lay it over the top of the wrist. When everything is snug, squeeze one off. There is always more felt recoil off the bench than offhand, so some extra felt recoil is expected.

I'm a large framed guy and sometimes I'll fold up a gun case to use as a pad when things start hurting. I always use a pad when working up a load. I don't want the anticipation of an unpleasant recoil to have any bearing on shooting each shot exactly the same.

Hope this helps.

Alan
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks! It definitely helped, I'm going to take it out again this week-end hopefully and see if I can get a better feel of it before deer season. The sack of corn was all I had unfortunately, I was so unprepared. I didn't even have ear protection so I had to buy a pair off of another shooter. Luckily the winchester ear-muffs only cost me $5. The gun is however, not that heavy which might play into recoil a tad bit. I shot it at my house once and I barely felt it. I was so surprised. Btw, if I was to get this gun camo dipped, anyone know would would do a good job? Also, is there another factory stock I could buy that is camp? I know they have them camo stocks in this gun but Gander didn't have it.
 

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I always use a sack of corn. I turn it longways and settle the rifle in when I'm working a load or shooting groups. It is extremely steady. I did some of the best shooting of my life off a sack of corn on the hood of my truck.

Alan
 

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I learned as a teenager that when shooting powerful rifles to always fold a dishtowel into a nice little pad and stick it on my shoulder under my shirt. Finally, I took an old T shirt and an old dish towel and actually sewed the whole contraption together. Works like a charm. For bench resting large caliber magnum rifles, I've even stuck a sandbag on my shoulder. Offhand is no problem - your body is free to roll with the weapon, but sitting or prone -forget it. Rifle butt recoil pads are a joke - even the best ones hardly help at all. The only thing that really works is an oversized, overstuffed, seriously thick folded up dishtowel. Or hand towel. Enjoy.
 

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Most of my rifles do not have recoil pads. Plastic or steel butt plates. A folded gun case or a rag or something else like that does the trick for me too. A friend called today and asked if he could use my press to load some 375 H&H Mag if he bought the dies. He's buying a Mod 700. It will be interesting at the range. I've never loaded for or shot a 375 H&H Mag. He priced some ammo at $100/20 and decided dies and reloading were the way to go.

Alan
 

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Maybe it`s a pyschological thing but I like a good recoil pad. I have a large wingspan ( 37 inch arms) and the pads help with LOP (length of pull) . I have though on my larger calibers done the folded towel thing if popping off a lot of rounds. And Alan, I have had the pleasure of shooting a 375 H&H twice in my life. It`s quite the ride!
 

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I'm a skinny, scrawny stick of a guy and shoot the big stuff all the time with no problem. Off the bench does kick a lot more, and not tucking it in tight against you will make it worse. If it's not pulled in tight, it's like getting punched as opposed to getting a little shove. I don't use any kind of pads, so I can't speak for those; but it seems like you need to work on your form/stance a little bit. Plus, if you are anticipating the recoil you won't be as accurate. With a slow, steady squeeze on the trigger, when the rifle fires it should come as a surprise to you. Just my .02
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
When I think about it single rifle shot isn't that bad. I put 30 rounds through it yesterday and now have a purple recoil bad imprint on my shoulder. The gun def is a high powered rifle.
 

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Only thing I can think of is maybe the way you're holding it because I shoot some pretty packed 8mm out of my mauser with steel plate & most I get is slight soreness like from working a chainsaw or carrying bags all day. from the way it sounds, it sounds like my first time shooting a .444 which ended with me having a purple print on my shoulder for a few days and little movement of the arm also.
 

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Just bought my first rifle I can actually own. It's a savage 30-06 xp hunter or whatever. I took it out to the range today and just used standard 150 grain cartridges but man oh man it hit my shoulder like nothing before. I have shot many rifles and shotguns alike from 300 win mag to 12 gauge buckshot, but this was intense! Am I not doing something right? What's the problem? I really love the gun and want to shoot it but my shoulder is killing me. Now I can handle the kick but is there anything I can do to make it a little easier? The recoil is fine but not a gun I'd like to use regularly.
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I've been through this with the same gun, and yes a day at the range firing multiple rounds over and over can be very painful compared to a shot here and there while hunting with heavier clothing in colder weather. I think it boils down to just that. You can obtain shoulder recoil pads, and obviously butt plate recoil absorbers, but other than that, beyond making sure that the gun is properly seated/placed on your shoulder there's not that much you can do. And try not to use aspirin or other blood thinners prior to shooting because that will add to bruising.
 
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