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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm dumb founded, sigh......

I have pretty good groups and better so I really didn't pay it any mind. The thing is I always wonder what happened when it wasn't consistent with the same loads. What your eye sees is one thing, but a Dial Indicator doesn't lie. I laid speer bullets on the anvil on my RCBS case master and didn't even have to dial them. GASP !

Noslers are .006 RO. Sierras are .004 RO. The hornady seater I use is pretty sloppy. Anybody here have Hornady seaters with the guide sleeve? I wrote Hornady and told them the dimensions. We'll see what they say.


Press ram is tight, shell holder is set in right and clean.

You thinking sizer die expander? I made my RCBS FL like a Forster, wit the rubber washer under the lock nut for the decapper. And I used a Lee die lock nut with the rubber oring. It decreased RO on the neck to .0015-.001.

Hornadys response....

Please try chamfering the inside of the case mouth more so you can see an obvious angle; you might also try dipping the bottom half of the bullet in powdered graphite before seating. The other thing you might consider with the longer ogive bullets is one of our other seating stems to fit the profile of the bullet better.
 

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As long as i can hit my target with reasonable accuracy. Im happy. (y) I had to look up what a case master is. Interesting tool. But i see no need for it. But im not a long range competition shooter. I never looked at how my Hornady dies are constructed.
 

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Have you used the case master to verify case neck concentricity before loading? Maybe turned the necks to improve concentricity? What brand of cases are you using?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yes I did check the necks.... No need to turn neck... I upgraded my RCBS die like a Forster... rubber washer under the decapping rod lock nut. Brought neck run out to .0015 - .001. Remington and surplus Loaded bullet the same run out.
 

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Some seater stems just do not play well with certain bullets. To a certain degree, you cannot count on Hornady seater to be best for Speer bullets. They will work, but may induce variables; some so slight, others more noticable. Some work appreciably better for a variety of bullets. My Redding seater works pretty good overall, but gives a lot of variation in length due to ogives variances in Nosler bullets. I can work around that, but it is annoying so I use Sierra and Barnes mostly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
even the sierra bullets are the same .004 runout. The speers were the worst, my goodness, just rotating the round without the gauge. The wobble was crazy ! Any bullet has a major wobble in the hornady stem ! I just asked Hornady how much a custom seater stem costs, waiting on thier response.
 

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Maybe don’t use Speer bullets. I suspect you have case neck inconsistencies in the thickness that you cannot see without a pilot in the neck while rotating it, but I don’t know if that is causing your issues. The suggestions from Hornady make sense, especially chamfering the case mouth, but if you are already doing all that I likely cannot help you. I load 6.5 Creedmore for long range accuracy, but I do turn the necks slightly on new brass. The results with Sierra 140 match is 5 shot one jagged hole at 100. I am no pro...just having fun. There are a few others, who have not chimed in yet, who are more experienced than I am...maybe they can provide some insight.
 

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There are different seater plugs for the various types of bullets out there.

What I do, on occasion, is if the bullet is "wobbly" on top of the case, I'll seat the bullet halfway, then raise the ram a bit, then seat it the rest of the way. That usually straightens them out very well. At least, it lets the brass case neck guide the bullet into place.

You can likely find a better seater plug, though, that holds your bullets perfectly vertical. The only bullets I ever have any issues with are the pointy rifle bullets. Especially the itty bitty .223 bullets.

--Wag--
 
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I find boat tail style bullets are eaiser to work with in .223. Flat base give me a hard time sometimes.
 
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I agree. If you use flat base bullets, you are well advised to give a slight flare to the case.

--Wag--
 
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Yes agreed. I bought a universal flairing die for them. And when i load cast for my 30/30. My RCBS press came today. I have the flair die in it already.
 

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Shell holders also can play a role in this and also having your shell holder fully seated in it's proper position or the case fully seated into the shell holder. Shell holders are mass produced and have tolerances. If it's not 100% lined up with the die you're bullets can be slightly crooked. For what i shoot i don't worry about tiny tolerances like this but i'm sure long range match shooters do.
 

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I agree. If you use flat base bullets, you are well advised to give a slight flare to the case.

--Wag--
That’s interesting. While I agree, flat based bullets are a bit more particular to get seated, I have never flared a case mouth on a rifle cartridge.
 

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That’s interesting. While I agree, flat based bullets are a bit more particular to get seated, I have never flared a case mouth on a rifle cartridge.
Me neither except in the case of cast bullets.
 
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That’s interesting. While I agree, flat based bullets are a bit more particular to get seated, I have never flared a case mouth on a rifle cartridge.
It can depend on the brass, too. Some of the thinner walled brass won't give too much trouble but sometimes, the thicker walled cases will close up just a hair more when resizing. A slight chamfer on the case mouth can take care of the problem rather than flaring the mouth.

Flaring can be a serious problem if it's done too wide as that can split the case mouth so only the very slightest flare at all is ever necessary. Getting a consistent flare, though, requires that all cases be trimmed to the same length, etc.

All these details!!! :)

--Wag--
 

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It can depend on the brass, too. Some of the thinner walled brass won't give too much trouble but sometimes, the thicker walled cases will close up just a hair more when resizing. A slight chamfer on the case mouth can take care of the problem rather than flaring the mouth.

Flaring can be a serious problem if it's done too wide as that can split the case mouth so only the very slightest flare at all is ever necessary. Getting a consistent flare, though, requires that all cases be trimmed to the same length, etc.

All these details!!! :)

--Wag--
Yes, and sometimes I am so picky about all the details (anal!). :rolleyes: I for sure get where you are coming from on this, but never have done it myself. Chamfer seems to work for me with all the brass I encounter, which includes military brass in .308. If I was shooting lead I would think it essential, but, as you say, critical to not flare too much and fatigue the case mouth.

This discussion got me thinking, “what would I flare them with should I choose to?“ Found the Lee universal flaring die that was quite reasonably priced. Always learning stuff...(y)
 
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