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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought an old 1907/17 lebel rifle off a friend, still in great working condition. He also gave me a bag of original ammo, which is really old.

I'm never going to fire any of this, and I'll probably go get them all refilled when I get a chance, but my question is about their safety.

I mean leaving them laying around in the bag, how gentle do I need to be with the bag/the bullets. I'm not sure wether or not I have to be really careful with them or I can handle them without worrying about them exploding spontateously.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think these are a bit older than that (no idea), but I'm paranoid and I read somewhere that older primers can actually increase in sensitivity.
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
Welcome to the forum, Mr. Pyromonkey. If you get a chance, you might go over to the New Members forum and say, "Hi!".

Old cartridges are not particularly dangerous, provided there are no corroded areas that could allow powder to leak and they are not subjected to high heat or concussion. Fact is, many of us have fired old ammo (over 70 yrs old) and had no safety issues at all. One thing you will notice is that, depending on its condition, you may have a certain percentage of duds and a few hang-fires as well. A hang-fire is when you pull the trigger and nothing happens immediately, but a few seconds later the round goes off. That is why it is VERY IMPORTANT that if you squeeze the trigger and nothing happens, that you keep the barrel pointing downrange for at least 30 seconds.

You mentioned getting the ammo "refilled". If you mean "reloaded", it is unlikely that anyone would want to do that for you with loaded ammo. It's better to shoot what you can and then talk about reloading the brass. It's a PITA to have to dismantle ammo, especially military ammo, and most reloaders would pass on that opportunity (I know I would!).

See you over at "New Members"!

~GR
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks a lot, makes me feel safer having this stuff around.

I was instructed to go to get the ammo reloaded, so that's why I said something like that. I'm just worried that I'll be holding one, drop it, it lands on the primer, and everything explodes.

I'll check out the new area, and if all else fails I can use these rounds to see what type I need to buy new.
 

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Old Ammo.

I have never used any that old, but that ammo will probably have what is known as corrosive primers. Just in case you don't know, that is primers made with mercury. The most important thing is to clean the gun immediately after shooting it. Good luck.
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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55,659 Posts
The original ammunition your friend gave you may be worth money to an ammunition collector.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I sort of expect it to be, and he also have me two 8 packs of old unopened ammo of the same type. He said that each is worth $100-$200, but I've no way of verifying that.
 

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Old School.
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Take it to a gun show and peddle it. If it's that old and in the original boxs it may surprise you what it will sell for. Good luck.:thumbsup:
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Unfortunately it's not in it's original box, but the two packs are still in their original paper and have been vaccuum sealed in plastic so the paper won't get messed up.
 
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