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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a S&W .357 Model 19 revolver that was never fired off my dad. I fired about 50 rounds of .38 special and the cylinder would jam...cylinder would not turn to align the next bullet with the barrel. I went to the range 3 times and it starts to jam after 50 rounds. My guess is that it jams when it overheats. What do you think?

Thomas:mad2:


bullets used: 38 SPC Winchester 130 grain FMJ

Is Federal Premium .357 Hrdro-shock a good bullet for home defense for a revolver like mine?
 

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The 500 S&W stare...
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10,304 Posts
I use 125 grain SJHPs in my 357 for defense. Both the Remington and the Federals have good reputations. The hydra shocks you mention should work great too.

As far as the jamming goes have you tried different ammo? Are the bullets slipping out of their crimps and creeping forward? Is that factory or reloaded ammo? Maybe it is running a touch on the hot side and buldging a primer.
 

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The 500 S&W stare...
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10,304 Posts
Oh another thing. Is there getting to be buildup on the forcing cone? If you barrel cylinder gap is tight and residue is building up there it might bind it up. 50 rounds doesn't seem like a lot though unless the timing is a little off and you are shaving the bullet a bit as it enters the cone.
 

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Old School.
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The ejector star shaft is loose more than likely. It is a reverse thread if you try to tighten it. Or there can be excessive build up of powder under the ejector star, or a piece of dirt or cleaning rag. Between my post and Bigweatherby it will be one of them.
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
The ejector star shaft is loose more than likely. It is a reverse thread if you try to tighten it. Or there can be excessive build up of powder under the ejector star, or a piece of dirt or cleaning rag. Between my post and Bigweatherby it will be one of them.

I suspect this is correct. I have experienced that with 22 magnums, both Ruger and Taurus. Found it was a build up of powder in the cylinder that prevented the bullets from seating fully. As the guns got hot the cylinder started dragging and finally stopped completely. Drove me nuts until I managed to clean out the groves.

Certain types of ammo may cause this issue more than others.

Clean the gun thoroughly and make sure you remove all lead build up in the forcing cone and cylinder. I have had to scrub the heck out of some revolvers to remove the lead buildup from reloads.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have a S&W 19-7 and have fired many rounds through it and the only time that I had a problem like that was when the ejector star had crap build up under it, just like BW and Baldy said. A good cleaning and it went away.:biggrin5:
 

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Premium Member
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15,424 Posts
Detailed cleaning inside and out, before anything else. I've seen S&Ws that never had their sideplate removed with oil that became like the consistency of tar, inside. You can go onto smith-wesson.com and look around for excellent instructions as to how you safely remove the sideplate and clean up in there. If you don't feel comfortable, bring it to a smith and pay a few bucks to have it done right.
 

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Registered
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I'd go on the S&W web site or just call the 800# for Smith. Follow the directions for sending in a gun for service. Bring it to UPS, insure it, send it out and forget about it. In about 2 or 3 weeks you'll have a model 19 at your door step that shoots like new. They might not even charge you, and if they do it will be well worth whatever they charge. If you want to follow what's happening while Smith has it, you can often speak to the actual tech that's performing the repair. They won't send that gun back to you unless it shoots like new. Good luck!!

http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/...1&storeId=10001&catalogId=10001&content=11001
 

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Old School.
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They are running out of some parts and things but they will do a clean and tune up on most anything they have ever built.
 

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even if the gun is 30 years old?
My S&W Model 36 Chief is 26 years old. recently I sent it in to S&W because I was getting an occasional dead hits on the certain factory ammo. Smith tuned it and replaced a couple of things and did charge me a little. I don't remeber exactly what the bill was, but it couldn't of been too bad or I would of remembered. Since then the gun performs like new, and haven't had a dead hit since either. I think that maybe it began to become sensitive to factory ammo with inherently harder primers after many years of service, (including controverseal plus + usage which I stay away from now), but it's working fine with anything that I load it with now. I have no regrets with any Smith revolvers or semi auto's, that I have or had (total of 7), and absolutely nothing but good things to say about their service.
They make a sure a good is working right before you get it back
 
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