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Hunt Forever!
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155 Posts
Looks good!
--FT
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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Congratulations Joe, you already made back more than it cost for your license!

A lot of people don't like these guns because they have a very hard double action trigger pull.

If they learn about the complex linkage necessary to lift the cylinder up and forward they would understand the heavy pull.

To me, learning the history of the older guns is as much enjoyment as shooting them.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you, guys,
>>A lot of people don't like these guns because they have a very hard double action trigger pull.
There is a white-metal spring inside this Nagant that is similar somehow to a new-york spring inside the glock guns. It is very tight and probably could be replaced by a lighter one. Well, they do not make them anymore. Trigger pool is very heavy because of this spring and I am not sure that it is justified for the civil use. As for military guys who ordered this gun long time ago, this folks really needed a heavy trigger, considering the fact that these gun was designed to be used by cavalry (ammo was selected as powerful enough to kill a horse in a close quarters combat ). It is not tight for me, but my wife ... she just could not squeeze it.
The gun itself is a piece of art. It sits in hand, and looks as a real thing. The new revolvers? They are oversimplified. Do no have such elegance. Just rotating a drum, hearing this checkering sound .. it is something.
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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3,428 Posts
When the russians decided they wanted a new revolver the one thing they were afraid of was that too much power would be lost through the gap between the barrel and cylinder.

To prevent this the designer built the gun so that when the trigger was pulled it moved the cylinder up and forward so the cylinder actually covers the forcing cone. The ammunition is loaded with the bullet recessed into the brass so the brass could make a seal on the forcing cone. It order to accomplish the cylinder movement the spring has to be stout. If the spring were replaced with a lighter one the gun would not operate as designed.

It the hammer is pulled back manually in a single action mode the trigger pull only releases the hammer to fall so the single action pull is much lighter.

A lot of people don't know the center pin can be screwed out and the pin rotated to be used as a punch to eject the shells.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
>>A lot of people don't know the center pin can be screwed out and the pin rotated to be used as a punch to eject the shells.
It takes time to get used to it and reloading should be very slow. I am still waiting for ammo to arrive from the online store I bought it. I am not sure if somebody thought Nagant can be reloaded during the battle. If all ammo is gone, revolver should be holstered and officer has to use a Plan B whatever it is. Reloading during a battle was not an option. Unless there is a good place to hide for 2-3 minutes in a static position. Again for cavalry it does not play a role anyway. Nobody could reload any type of a revolver riding a horse. So probably the idea was - screw the reloading . 7 rounds one time deal. If ammo is gone use a sabre.

This is the spring we are talking about:

 

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Military Rifle Collector
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692 Posts
Along with the 7.62x38R ammo I have also shot .32 S&W, .32 S&W long and .32 H&R magnum cartridges out of my Nagant revolver. They do sell a replacement .32 cylinder for it but I just shoot them out of the original one.
Nice looking revolver you got.
 
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