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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I sold off a few guns recently that I just did not want to take on the road with my in my RV traveling for some time. I researched the values and placed an ad in the local newspaper.

I had a guy call me at 0620 in the morning the first day of the ad. I am glad I get up early in the morning! He asked me for prices and I told him the prices of the two pieces he was interested in and the condition. He asked me if that was negotiable and I told him I would let him have both for $50 off my asking price otherwise I would just keep them.

On those conditions he came to the home. He looked at the guns and offered nearly $200 less than I had told him. I reminded him that I had told him what the price would be if he bought both guns. He again flashed this cash and I told him no and took the handgun from him that he was holding and put in away. He then stuck the money in my face and told me this was a one time offer. I told him he could leave or I would escort him the hard way.

Another buyer bought the guns two hours later without question for my price by the way.
I had one last gun for sale and a man came here to buy it. I told him about the first buyer and how rude he was and he said "I like to make offers too but you don't have to be such an a**hole about it". I informed him that I had informed the guy of the deal before he came and that was it. Shoving money in my face 3 times when I told him no is not going to change my mind. He made another crack about how he buys guns all the time for less than asking price and I told him to go find a wholesaler to do business and left him standing by his car on my property.

I have done a lot of negotiations buying used stuff myself over the years but never in this manner. And I certainly would not refer or imply to an owner on his own property that he is an a**hole for refusing an offer. Particularly considering the fact that the guy was holding a gun at the time! -I
 

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Old School.
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That's about right for our society today. One with manners and two jerks. I run into them all the time on both sides of the trading table at gun shows. I always ask if that's the least you will take when buying a used gun. If he comes down great, if he don't I either buy it or hand it back and thank him for his time. I only buy revolvers becaue I know them better, so I pretty well know what the gun is worth before I even pick it up. Good luck. :)
 

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Pro Gun Advocate
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Amazing.

I've negotiated on used cars before, but always with respect.

Calling someone names is NOT part of the process.

I had similar experiences when I had my own business helping people sell their businesses.

People would call and tell me that I was asking too much before even knowing what I was asking!!!! The price was never advertised.

There's negotiating, there's haggling, then there's being downright rude.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree with you totally.
It seems many younger than I did not learn repect for others let alone themselves.
I can be extremely agressive when prevoked and it's something they don't want to see.
 

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Harley Dude
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I run into this problem on occasion at the box store. A buyer with an attitude will come in and just drive me nuts with questions, trying to wear me down on price. I may cut the price 10% since that's about all I have the authority to do, but it is never enough and he will leave saying he must shop around. This guy is not fun to deal with and always comes back telling me that he bought the tool from the other box store for a lessor price.

This is a scavenger mentality. They run around offering fire sale cash in the hopes that they will find someone in desperate need of cash that will jump at the chance to get some cash in hand.
I suppose it works too, they just visit many sellers and make offers until they find the right person that needs the money.

A rude buyer turns me off as much as a rude seller. I will play for a while then I will just go into dumb mode, fix a price and say, that's the best I can do and walk away. If the buyer is rude I will not give them my best deal anymore, I prefer to sell and negotiate with people who have integrity.

If you have occasion to deal with these types often just raise the price when they show up. That will drive them nuts and you just explain you made a mistake in the ad. You can do that as an individual without repercussions, but not as a retailer. ;) ;)
 

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I do not sell guns. If I were to do so I would sell on consignment thru a FFL dealer. This would fix the price
and create FFL transfer document for proof of ownership.
 

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Last Saturday we went to what now passes for our local gun show. A few yrs ago we always rented two or three tables and enjoyed the event, not just the money to be made. For the past 5 or 6 yrs it has become a nuisance. The stuff people have on their tables is 90% garbage that they think is gold. The rudeness knows no bounds and has no birthday. I see youngsters getting their sticky fingers all over the exhibitors' goods and older folks (40s to 60s) displaying the same behavior I used to blame on "the kids". Disgusting. When I see something that interests me, I'll ask whether the price is firm. If it is, and I know it's too high, I just move on. Nothing is gained by my telling the seller that he's out of line.

As an FFL with a small gun business, I go to gun shows as sort of a big garage sale. I'm looking for the estates and the tables full of reloading tools and components that someone is trying to dump. Sure I'm looking for good prices -- everyone is -- but harrassment and name-calling is not part of that process. Maybe I'm the fool, but every time I've spent two minutes to just speak to the seller and establish a relationship -- however superficial -- I've gotten what I want at a decent price AND left the table with both the seller and myself smiling. Whether I leave with one box of bullets for $5.00 or a Colt Python for $700.00, no one felt screwed. I often will leave my business card with folks who are selling. When I get call-backs from them or, better yet, folks who they refer to me, I feel I'm doing my business right.
 

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gunrnr said:
As an FFL with a small gun business, I go to gun shows as sort of a big garage sale. I'm looking for the estates and the tables full of reloading tools and components that someone is trying to dump. Sure I'm looking for good prices -- everyone is -- but harrassment and name-calling is not part of that process. Maybe I'm the fool, but every time I've spent two minutes to just speak to the seller and establish a relationship -- however superficial -- I've gotten what I want at a decent price AND left the table with both the seller and myself smiling.
I agree 100%.

I've gone to my local show (1,000+ tables) so often--either as a customer or by manning our state 2a group--that I know lots of the sellers.

I ALWAYS stop by to say hi to the ones I know and/or have dealt with, or if I'm looking at something, chat with them a little. Heck, I talk to them even if I'm NOT looking for anything special.

Someone who defines a 'success' by beating down another human being is engaging in definition of character, and it ain't a good thing. A deal like that would take all pleasure out of owning whatever it was a got.
 
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I never really understood the haggle game. When I sell something I ask a fair price and stick with it. I am not a business so I don't have to compete with anyones prices though.
I sell cars alot, I am always getting deals on cars being a mechanic, and if someone asks if I will settle for $XXX.XX off I just tell them if I would settle for less I would have asked less. I find it a rude tactic.
Some people will turn down a deal just because they can't get the price reduced by a small fraction. There is something wrong with that.
 

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Harley Dude
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CM3 said:
I never really understood the haggle game. When I sell something I ask a fair price and stick with it. I am not a business so I don't have to compete with anyone's prices though.
I sell cars a lot, I am always getting deals on cars being a mechanic, and if someone asks if I will settle for $XXX.XX off I just tell them if I would settle for less I would have asked less. I find it a rude tactic.
Some people will turn down a deal just because they can't get the price reduced by a small fraction. There is something wrong with that.

I do think it is very natural for folks to assess the value of a car and make an offer that may be 5-10% under the asking price. Its kind of a mindset that we all have knowing that dealers always mark up a car to mark it down in the sale.

I will set my car price a bit on the high side and expect to make a small discount and that gets me a fair price and the buyer is happy that they struck a "fair" deal.

It an expected practice in home buying also.

But if the seller holds firm on the price then you have to respect the fact that it is his/her low price and make a decision as to whether you want the car or house for that price. I would never try to disrespect a seller by cutting down the product and showing anger at his reluctance to reduce the price to my price. I just move on if I think the price is too high.

I don't let people offend me anymore when I am selling something of value. I just state my low price and say that is the lowest I will go and then they can buy or leave. I don't get upset one way or another because I always know someone will come along and buy my product if the price is a fair price.
 

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It's amazing the gall some people have. Many think they are the only ones with $1.50, and everyone else is desperate. Bill T.
 
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