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Recently i decided to go to the range after almost a year break. As I opened my ammo crate where i keep some of my gun cleaning supply i had a full bottle of rubbing alcohol break which poured all over a few hundred rounds of 9mm and .45acp boxes of ammo. I would estimate 6 months+ the ammo had been exposed to the rubbing alcohol. The ammo boxes had pretty much dissolved and the ammo was a bit wet and sticky. i was on my way to the range so i quickly towel clean the ammo. After half a clip on my glock 19, p365 and fnx 45, I was getting miss fire on all three guns.

My question is can i salvage the rounds?
I hear vinegar and salt is an easy way to clean ammo. Or, did the rubbing alcohol did more damage than i hoped for?

Appreciate your help!
 

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If the ammo is missfiirng then the alcohol has made it's way inside and fouled either the primer, powder or both.
 

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Lesson learned, only store ammo by itself in its own container. It happens to the best of us, I had boxed ammo in a drawer when some oil had leaked. They were totally hosed so I ended up breaking them down and saving the cases for reloading. Now, all my ammo is stored in metal ammo boxes plastic is junk with silica packs and never again have had an issue. I have had misfires with manufactured ammo but never with my reloads.
 

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Define misfire. Did all the rounds go off? Did they jam or fail to feed?
 
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Define misfire. Did all the rounds go off? Did they jam or fail to feed?
Misfire is synonymous with failure to fire, and you’ll usually experience this type of malfunction as an audible click. A misfire can be caused by a defective primer or a light primer strike. If you experience a failure to fire, manufacturers usually recommend you wait 30 seconds to 5 minutes before attempting to clear the weapon.

What a real ***** is when you have a misfire with a 76mm shell, and you are in the heat of the battle. No time to wait take your chances and eject it and throw it over the side.
Gas Audio equipment Cylinder Machine Auto part
 

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Misfire is synonymous with failure to fire, and you’ll usually experience this type of malfunction as an audible click. A misfire can be caused by a defective primer or a light primer strike. If you experience a failure to fire, manufacturers usually recommend you wait 30 seconds to 5 minutes before attempting to clear the weapon.

What a real * is when you have a misfire with a 76mm shell, and you are in the heat of the battle. No time to wait take your chances and eject it and throw it over the side.
Another PITA -- Starter cartridges for aircraft that hang fire. And, if the plane is on alert, reach in, pull the canister, dump the cart in a bucket of water, reload and rock-and-roll.

Yes, it happened to me at Udorn Thailand, and walking away from the F-4 with a smoking fist full of burning powder allowed the pilot & GIB to have something to write home about.
 

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Not trying to be critical, but...
Common sense has always told me not to store ANY kind of liquid in with my ammo. The only thing I store with my ammo is silica packs,... and my firearms. And my cleaning kits are always on the bottom in the safe.
When dealing with my "go bags", my cleaning kits are double bagged in heavy duty "zipper" freezer bags, and are in their own little carry packs (when possible). If anything does leak, it's contained.
 
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