National Gun Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all.

Can anyone please educate me as to rifling? What does "1 in 12" mean?

Isn't true the tighter your rifling, the more stable the bullet is in flight?

Is it expensive to buy very tightly rifled target/hunting rifles? How about pistols?

Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
1:12 would be one turn of the bullet for every 12" of barrel length.

tighter is not always better. Its all about bullet weight, diameter and a bunch of other stuff I dont really understand. Just bought a lever action that is like 1:34 or something and its damn accurate
 

·
Ruler of Ramnation
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Hey all.

Can anyone please educate me as to rifling? What does "1 in 12" mean?

Isn't true the tighter your rifling, the more stable the bullet is in flight?

Is it expensive to buy very tightly rifled target/hunting rifles? How about pistols?

Thanks

Means one complete 360° twist rifling over 12 inches of barrel length. Twist ratios seldom make an impact on cost unless it goes to extremes or is not normally offered. Take the AR-15 rifle for instance. Offered mainly in 1:7, 1:8, or 1:9 twist. For the reloader or custom hunter, this means a best compromise for the intended bullet weights. Generally, the heavier bullet would require a faster twist rate (1:7)to stabilize it correctly. .223 bullets (or .224 actually) are made in a variety of weights for intended applications. Say.....45gr -75gr. Bolt action rifles in the .223 caliber would more than likely offer more available twist rates than an auto-loader in 5.56/.223 simply because of the intended use and bullet weights commonly used. Your intended loadings and usage should dictate what twist rate you get to a certain extent. If you plan to span the offerings in any caliber, just go with the average or middle ground in twist rate and bullet weight. If you're thinking about 600yd competition, bullet weight and twist rate would need to be dead on for the intended purpose and may involve something custom. For the most part, firearms manufacturers and bullet manufacturers have taken the headache out of the general/average use department while at the same time offering more for the special applications. The twist rate and bullet weight= optimum performance. Now I'm rambling.......hope this explains a bit more for you. Here's more in simpler terms.
http://www.gunnersden.com/index.htm.rifle-barrel-twist-rates.html
 
G

·
twist

usually the heavier a bullet of a certain caliber is, the longer it has to be. Think about being able to throw by hand a 5 pound cylinder of wood that was 6 inches long, keeping it flying longways (horizontally). how fast would you have to spin it (like the "spiral" put on a football). Compare that to throwing something like a broom handle. The longer cylinder would have to be spun faster to keep it completely stable (also TOO fast unstabilizes also). I think that's the way it goes anyway. If I'm backwards on this I'm sure somebody will "stabilize" me! :crazy:
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top