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Thinking about getting a blackpowder revolver.
Know nothing about them can anyone point me in the right dirrection?
 
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Well, the Ruger Old Army is the best you can buy, if you can find one. Ruger dis-continued them.

After that, you have a choice of the myriad of reproductions on the market. You can have a Remington repo or a Colt. I prefer the Remington because it is much more solidly built, having a topstrap that the Colts lack. There are many importers, but most of the guns are build by either Pietta or Uberti. I have had both, and have been happy with both. Believe it or not, Cabela's has about as good a deal on new black powder revolvers as anybody I have seen. This is what I would recommend for your first BP revolver:
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...tchall&Nty=1&Ntt=remington+revolver&noImage=0

I would avoid the brass framed guns. They are cheaper, but will not take a steady diet of shooting.
 

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+1 for Cabelas, they have a large selection of black powder revolvers on their web site. Some fo the best prices also.
 

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I recommend a repica (obviously) 1858 Army model. The one I had was so freaking cool. And so cheap to shoot because all I had to pay for was #11 caps. I made my own powder and casted my own balls. I had the Buffelo model which sported a nice 12" bbl. Very accurate.
 

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Remember when you load the cylinder, glob some crisco into the cylinder on top of the balls. This will prevent the flash from fireing pass over into another chamber and fireing it as well. I had an original .31 colt do that. It also helps at clean up time. I use dollar store window cleaner now to clean BP guns, it has soap, ammonia, and alcohol which all work well for black powder. The WD in WD 40 means water displacement, it will help to dry out after cleaning, just finish with some real oil to stop rust, always check the gun in the next day or so to make sure no rust is takeing hold.
 
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Ca doj ?

last year my house was broken in to and all of my firarms were stolen including my safe. the very next day after the report was taken the local PD had recovered 6 of the 9 guns that were taken, one of wich is an 1851 navy colt. now i understand i have to go through the DOJ to get my regular guns back but do i need to go through the prosses with my 1851? i'm having a hell of a time convincing the PD that it's not concidered a firearm to ATF. any ideas?
 
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I happen to own the Pietta Stainless Steel 1858 New Army .44 Cal BP pistol (8" Barrel). Its a massive hand cannon. The stainless is super easy to clean, that and I use .457 ball with Wonder Wads, so I don't have to grease the chambers (it becomes a messy hassle). I load my powder, load the wad, and a greased ball. I am good to go! No fuss, no muss. I get a tiny bit of lead sheer around the cylinder when I am loading, but thats a good thing. It insures a good, tight seal.

I also keep 2 extra cylinders (which are easy and relatively inexpensive to pick up) as well. If you are going to go Black Powder, I highly recommend the stainless version of what it is you decide on if its available.

Now, heres a tricky piece. I was given a Ruger Old Army by a guy that I only met once. He doesn't shoot black powder so, he simply gave it to me, along with a few other rifles. It was in pretty bad shape. Rust everywhere, etc. Even the inside of the barrel has some rust pitting (superficial).

Well, after a couple day of cleaning and repolishing, it looks good as new...maybe even better. Even the barrel interior shines like a mirror. You'd never recognize it from what was given me.

At any rate, the only thing that I couldn't do much with was the cylinder. 2 of the nipples are completely stripped out. Can't pull 'em to clean it properly. I am writing the cylinder off as a loss. Problem is, I can only find ONE person that sells replacement cylinders, and they are custom made, going for about $165.00 each. That seems a bit excessive to me...

Thus, I've decided to go with the Kirst Konversion cylinder. I foudn the cylinders for .45 LC and .45 ACP. I am picking them both up. They run $265.00 a piece...but I think they are worth it. Also, I like them better than the R&D Conversion cylinders because I don't need to take the cylinder out of the pistol to reload it.

I'll let you know how it all goes after I am done custominzing it!
 
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I happen to own the Pietta Stainless Steel 1858 New Army .44 Cal BP pistol (8" Barrel). Its a massive hand cannon. The stainless is super easy to clean, that and I use .457 ball with Wonder Wads, so I don't have to grease the chambers (it becomes a messy hassle). I load my powder, load the wad, and a greased ball. I am good to go! No fuss, no muss. I get a tiny bit of lead sheer around the cylinder when I am loading, but thats a good thing. It insures a good, tight seal.

I also keep 2 extra cylinders (which are easy and relatively inexpensive to pick up) as well. If you are going to go Black Powder, I highly recommend the stainless version of what it is you decide on if its available.

Now, heres a tricky piece. I was given a Ruger Old Army by a guy that I only met once. He doesn't shoot black powder so, he simply gave it to me, along with a few other rifles. It was in pretty bad shape. Rust everywhere, etc. Even the inside of the barrel has some rust pitting (superficial).

Well, after a couple day of cleaning and repolishing, it looks good as new...maybe even better. Even the barrel interior shines like a mirror. You'd never recognize it from what was given me.

At any rate, the only thing that I couldn't do much with was the cylinder. 2 of the nipples are completely stripped out. Can't pull 'em to clean it properly. I am writing the cylinder off as a loss. Problem is, I can only find ONE person that sells replacement cylinders, and they are custom made, going for about $165.00 each. That seems a bit excessive to me...

Thus, I've decided to go with the Kirst Konversion cylinder. I foudn the cylinders for .45 LC and .45 ACP. I am picking them both up. They run $265.00 a piece...but I think they are worth it. Also, I like them better than the R&D Conversion cylinders because I don't need to take the cylinder out of the pistol to reload it.

I'll let you know how it all goes after I am done custominzing it!
Nykodymus ,
They sell oversized threade Treso nipples for your Ruger , bigger threades , tap your cylinder is all it takes and $25 for the nipples , problem solved . Track of the Wolf , or the Possibles Shop has them in stock .
Your welcome , Guttbicket out
 
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BrandonSuperglide

BrandonSuperglide ,

Either the Colt or Remington or Ruger , Rogers and Spencer , Spiller and Burr would be a great first gun for you . If your not into mammoth guns the Ruger isn't your cup of tea though , its pretty huge and heavy . A Colt Walker wouldn't be a great first gun either unless you have lots of experince handling big guns like the Model 29 Smith or simular cannons .
Cabelas has a few, very few compaired to Dixie gunworks, go check them out onthe web , they have litterally 100 hundred to choose from and prices are as good or better than Cabelas depending on what model you want .
Here's the deal , Colts foul less than Remingtons , Remingtons are easier to clean and swap cylinders and are more accurate because of the solid frame .
Colts point nicer than the Remingtons though and are very beautiful guns on top of being very nicely designed too . You can get conversion cylinders for the Colts too and I am darn good at changing them out, fast , just takes experience is all . The Ruger, top notch gun there , well built , solid , expensive and they don't make them anymore. They are also NOT period correct at all , only that they fire black powder, that's it .
The Rogers and Spencer is a fine gun too and they make conversion cylinders for it also . The Spiller and Burr is another great gun, easy to swap out cylinders , is .36 and is very reliable, but LOUD, the forcing cone is flush with frame on this one , but a fine gun nonetheless .
The world is your oyster here and you can't go wrong with any of them you like to look at. Find one that is pleasing to your eye first, then buy it, shoot it
and then buy the others ! For ease of shooting and maintenance I would get the Remington . But for pure pointability I would go Colt handsdown .
If you get a chance get an 1861 Navy , then you'll understand what one of the finest guns made feels like in your hand .
Check out DIxie for sure, there customer service is well beyond Cabelas, they actualy have thier own Gunsmith there and there return of your gun will be prompt if you need any service . Cabelas pretty much only has a no questions asked policy but does little for someone that wants to keep there gun , especially if they have no replacements for the damged or broken one you send back . Dixie will fix it or send a new one .
Whatever you do just go buy one and experience it, it is AWSOME !!!! :thumbsup:

Guttbicket
 
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Hey Guttbicket - You are absolutely correct. These are the same opinions that I share through my own experience with them. Instead of teh 1861, I went with the venerable 1851 Old Navy Colts by Pietta though. Whats even better is that the alot of the parts between the 1861 and the 1851 are swappable, including cylinders if made by the same manufacturer!

Thanks for the post, I really enjoyed reading it!
 
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