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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings!

This is my very first post, though I've been lurking for awhile - what a fantastic forum! Was gonna post in the New Members section first off, but I've got a question that can't wait, lest I lose what may be a good deal - so my introduction follows in the next paragraph (so's you can skip it if you just want the meat of my question).

My name is Dick Purzer, I'm 28 years old and a newbie attorney living in San Antonio. Airguns and powderburners have been lifelong sources of enjoyment, though I'm pretty new to Internet posting and blogging and what have you. My girlfriend (who entered our relationship owning more guns than I did, incidentally) practices bankruptcy law, and I'm trying to get started in criminal. We live with a number of strange animals and spend as much time as we can camping. I am plan to buy a Remington 700 in .223 in the next few days. The gun will be a present for my girlfriend, who owns countless handguns and one beat up old Nylon 66 she got from her grandfather, but no centerfire rifles. The only centerfire rifle I own is a 7 mag, an old Ruger 77 that fouls up something awful but shoots like a laserbeam. I'm afraid that if this gun were her introduction to centerfire rifles she might develop a flinch (or, worse yet, shoot tighter groups than me with my own gun).

I've been looking at the 700SPS Varmint, and it looks ideal for my purposes, which is to provide a barrel and action on par with the 700P, yet save money with a POS stock. I've looked at the "Sniper Central" forum, and they compare the P with the SPS, noting the inferior stock as the major difference between the two. My goal (this rifle will be a gift) is not to acquire the optimum initial configuration, but rather to provide a solid platform that could be developed with an aftermarket stock, action bedding, barrel floating, Jewell trigger, etc., one piece at time so that her own increasing skill will be complemented by incremental increases in the quality and inherent accuracy of the rifle itself. Know what I mean?

My major concern is that by opting for the SPS over the P, I might be lowering the ceiling on far she can take this rifle, if she chooses to. I suppose the key issue is, can an SPS compare with the P (or other entries in the 700 series) in terms of accuracy if everything other than the barrel and action were eventually to be upgraded? I realize that this is not the most efficient way of developing an accurate rifle, but again this is meant to be a fun project for her as much as anything. I want to give her a very basic yet solid foundation that allows her to upgrade the rifle, bit by bit, so she can experience for herself the advantages of crisp triggers and all the other good stuff. Basically, I want a rifle that starts out relatively clunky due to a crappy stock, a 5 pound trigger and a barrel and action torqued up against a wad of injection molded plastic so that she can experience these limitations for herself and slowly remedy these faults, improving and personalizing the rifle. But while I'm happy to have a stock and trigger that need work, I want the guts of the rifle to be sound. Can I get this with the SPS? Is it basically a sound barrel and action, or should I look elsewhere?

Many thanks,

Dick
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
welcome. tough to beat a rem.700 in any caliber. i own 2 and love them both. imo a rem 700 is like a jeep,infinately adjustable and everybody has the parts for it.the sps stock is o.k. but is easily upgraded.i like mpi's kevlar stock but not cheap. remington triggers are also easily adjustable down to about 2# which is as low as i go for hunting but jewell makes an excellent trigger that is also an easy swap out.the upgrades are endless and rem makes a bolt action second only to mauser imo.i'd buy one for my wife.
 

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I've looked at the "Sniper Central" forum, and they compare the P with the SPS, noting the inferior stock as the major difference between the two.
The answer to your question.
 

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You could always go with the SPS and see just how well it shoots. If it doesn't satisfy you it takes little to purchase an H&S Precision Stock with the fully machined Aluminum bedding block. The barreled action simply drops right in. Tighten the 2 action screws, and you're good to go. I did this with a Remington 700 Safari Grade in .458 Win. Mag. I had that split the factory Walnut stock. Everything fit perfectly, and the gun was more accurate too boot. Bill T.
 
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