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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a .45acp what will the savings be if I do reloading? I have never done this before.
 

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Old School.
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Let's put it this way. At the range I go to a box of .45acp's cost $24.50 and I can reload that same 50rds for $5.50 using range brass. Buy good stuff and it will last a life time and be paid for in couple of years if you shoot much. Good luck. :biggrin5:
 

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Harley Dude
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I second "Baldys" comments. I always figured if I can use my old brass its about $6 a box. Now at current powder, bullet and primer pricing that might be a little higher.

The 45 acp is a low pressure round and if you load target light loads the brass will last for many years of normal shooting.
 

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I started reloading about 5-6 months ago, from the advice of members on the Handgunforum.net forum. I reload mostly .45 ACP and it as about 1/3 - 1/4 the cost of store bought ammo. Plus, it is enjoyable and relaxing.
 

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Harley Dude
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I started reloading about 5-6 months ago, from the advice of members on the Handgunforum.net forum. I reload mostly .45 ACP and it as about 1/3 - 1/4 the cost of store bought ammo. Plus, it is enjoyable and relaxing.

Yep, I agree. Always call it stress therapy!
 

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Sure beats arguing with the lady
 

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I started reloading about 5-6 months ago, from the advice of members on the Handgunforum.net forum. I reload mostly .45 ACP and it as about 1/3 - 1/4 the cost of store bought ammo. Plus, it is enjoyable and relaxing.
It is enjoyable and I also find it relaxing . . . .

Rod
 

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All of the above, but honestly, if a shooter only goes through 4-5 boxes of ammo per year, the initial investment won't be recouped for quite a while. It's best to either find someone who will help you out or go ahead and get into reloading for the fun and relaxation.

The guys who go out and buy a brand-new RCBS or Dillon system and all the other goodies, can easily drop close to a grand in one fell swoop. Takes a hell of a lot of reloading to break even! I would watch for a good used single-stage press and just acquire the rest as you can.
 

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Old School.
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Another little thing is buy in bulk when you can. Your powder,bullets, and primers are going up on a monthly bases. If you shoot a lot it's the only way to go. Mr Gunrnr is dead right about some of the larger outfits that can do it all and are progressive. They will run in the $700 to $1,000 range and they are worth it if you shoot a lot. I load for my family and we are shooting about a 1,000rds rounds plus a month. So you can see it was worth it for me to invest a $1,000 in my set up. :thumbsup:

Here's a Load Calulator that will tell you how much you are spending per box or round. Remember buy in bulk. :biggrin5:
http://www.handloads.com/calc/loadingCosts.asp

Here's a picture of my set up a Dillon 650XL and it cost right at a grand. Best money I ever spent. Remember also this is a hobby within a hobby. :biggrin5:

 

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Here's a picture of my set up a Dillon 650XL and it cost right at a grand. Best money I ever spent. Remember also this is a hobby within a hobby. :biggrin5:
Exactly . . a hobby within a hobby . .

A good place to look around for some good bargains on top grade reloading supplies is . "Gun Shows" . I've picked up plenty of great bargains going to my locals Gun Shows. You can reload and have fun doing it with a good used RCBS RockCrusher. That's what I still use and it works like a hot damn. There's usually plenty of used dies at the shows as well; just be sure you know how to tell the good ones. Just about everything you'll need you can pick up by hang'n around the Gun Shows. Just be patient and don't expect to get a hold of everything at the first one. I keep going for the breakfasts but come home with treasures. Powder I like to buy new or if at show it must be sealed.

The way to begin is go buy a good reload manual and read the beginning over and over until you understand. There's plenty of good books that'll teach you a lot. Read them through and learn and that'll help when you're poke'n around looking for reloading stuff.

Regards:
Rod
 

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Old School.
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Exactly . . a hobby within a hobby . .
The way to begin is go buy a good reload manual and read the beginning over and over until you understand. There's plenty of good books that'll teach you a lot. Read them through and learn and that'll help when you're poke'n around looking for reloading stuff.

Regards:
Rod
One of the best begining manuals is Modern Reloading by Richard Lee. It is slanted a little towards Lee products but there is a lot of good information in it and it only cost about $12.00 new. Lyman has a good one and Speer #14 is about the best for everything. Winchester went to a magizine type format but the info is good. Hodgdon is on line at this address. http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp

Good luck and don't forget we'll help if we can. :thumbsup:
 

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I second what Wraco says. Check out the gun shows for a real deal on used reloading tools. I have been reloading .45 with home cast lead since the fifties, Still got a bucket of wheel weights and a pile of linotype that were gifts. That means the rounds cost about a nickle each. Cost of press and dies will soon be covered then it's a free ride.
 

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I agree that looking for used gear is the way to go. I reload a lot, and I do mean a lot. I have actually burned out 2 Lee Load Masters. If you are loading for only one caliber, you can do very nicely with a single stage press. You can find a used Rock Chucker for around $50. Lee stuff, even new, goes cheap on places like Ebay and Auctionarms.com. If you are new to reloading, definitely start with a single stage. You will have to stop and think about what you are doing. Unlike a progressive that can carry an error out to many rounds. I once forgot top lock the sizing die and had it walk out a bit during a marathon session. I found that the shoulder of the 5.56X45 cases were slightly out of spec and would not feed in any of my AR's. I was able to narrow the error down to the last 400 rounds. But still, there is no joy in pulling down 400 rounds, separating the parts and doing them all over again.

Also, read up on reloading a lot. Better yet is find a buddy that has some time on the press and ask to learn from him.

Consistency in the way you do things is key for good ammo and safety.

One warning. Reloading is additive. You may think you are saving money. But when you start kicking out cheap ammo you will start shooting more. Which leads to more reloading, which leads to more reloading, which leads t o shooting more....IT WILL NEVER END!:yikes1:
 
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