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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen a few on the shelf at the range and I was wondering what would be best to read a few times before getting started? Your thoughts, ladies and gentlemen?
 

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Red State Rising
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I liked the Lyman manual pretty well for a beginner. Also RCBS has a cool little how-to guide that is a quick read, and will help you understand a bit better the process of reloading. You can find it here: http://www.rcbs.com/guide/printsteps.html
 

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Lyman and ABC'S of Reloading are the best for beginners. But, the more guides you have, the better reference you have for load data.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses, fellas. When I decided I wanted to look into it, I was overwhelmed by all of the equipment and jargon. I decided right then that my first piece of reloading equipment should be a book, but I didn't know which would be the best, lol.
 

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If you can only afford one manual, I would start with Richard Lee's "Modern Reloading". It has the most background info, a host of "good to know" stuff that is not covered in other manuals, and is very complete in it's reloading data. It includes as many loads for each caliber as I've seen and does not seem to favor one brand of powder or projectile over others.
 
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I'll add my 2 thumbs up for Lee's book.
Although, my uncle got me started reloading, gave me one of Lee's hand kits (the one with the rod and you use a mallet to load). Learned a bit from that, along with reading up on it. When I bought my Anniversary Kit, they included Hodgdon's load book, there's a decent amount in there, but nothing like Lee's or the Lyman one.
 

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That's cool, lil'gun03. I have a Lee Loader kit in .357 Magnum and one in .41 Magnum in the "Gunrunner Museum of Reloading History". Many a round was hammered together before I could afford my first RCBS Junior! Hey...they WORKED!
 

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after the basic manuals I prefer the bullet manufacturers manuals. They use several different brands of powders. Although on line, the Hodgdon site is good because it includes Hodgdon, IMR and Winchester powders.

The internet is a great resource but I like to have a solid book in my hands. Something you can thumb through. You learn many things on your way to looking up other things. The 'net' is very direct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I went to Cabela's yesterday and they were out of the Lee manual, so I got the Nosler manual. It seems to have plenty of data for different bullet weights in rifle calibers, but only one for my 9mm. I did plan on getting more manuals after getting the advice here, so I think I'll hold onto it. The getting started section is easy to understand, and I'm sure I'll make .270 rounds sooner or later.
 

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loading manuals are valuable for more than load data. they often have ballistic graphs, point blank range calculations, information on what to look for in your brass when reloading,like how to check for stretched brass by using a wire to feel inside for thinned brass. Read the manual. You will be surprised. If it was only load data you could stick with the net.
 

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Greetings...

I have seen a few on the shelf at the range and I was wondering what would be best to read a few times before getting started? Your thoughts, ladies and gentlemen?

All of them. The more information you have to average out expected error, the better off you will be. Every single one of them probably contain the exact same warning - These are suggestions only - We survived testing these combinations - You might not.

That's a truism.

No book is better or more reliable than any other. Some may contain the info you are researching, another might not. That's, really, the only quality that really counts. And that info may or may not be even be accurate.

You have to remember that reloading is a scientific process, and all data is suspect. You have to empirically determine for yourself what works in YOUR unique firearm - within a safety limit determined purely by trusting manufacturing tolerances and statistics.

What level of reporting error are you willing to accept as safe. That's why they all contain that warning. We lived doing it this way - But your milage may vary...

Putting your trust in any one reloading book, is not a wise decision. There's only ONE book that I have absolute trust in - and it ain't a reloading book...
 

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it will work out just fine. The more sources of information you have regarding loading data the better off you will be.

I have several manuals. For a particular round and bullet/powder I take all of the maximum loads and whichever maximum load has the smallest amount of powder, I consider that my maximum load. There are so many variables involved that I take the more conservative road. Eyes and fingers are not replaceable.
 

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Old School.
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Well, I went to Cabela's yesterday and they were out of the Lee manual, so I got the Nosler manual. It seems to have plenty of data for different bullet weights in rifle calibers, but only one for my 9mm. I did plan on getting more manuals after getting the advice here, so I think I'll hold onto it. The getting started section is easy to understand, and I'm sure I'll make .270 rounds sooner or later.
Speer, Lee, Lyman, and Winchester are the ones I have. I am going to get a Nosler next trip down to the supply store. Make the .270's after you get going and get a feel for reloading. When your lighing up that much powder close to your face you want everything right. Good luck and give us a report on how things are going for you. :thumbsup:
 
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