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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a box full of miscellaneous reloading items from dies, empty cartridges, shell holders, cleaning kits, etc.etc. representing 10 to 15 different guns. I knew what every item was for, except one, and I need someone to tell me what I have. Most all the material was 50's to 60's stuff. The picture shows this unknown item after removing the dark crud of it with fine steel. The cartridge to its left is a standard 30-06 cartridge. Here are the dimensions:
1. overall length with screw head screwed all the way down....... 2.325
2. Screw hole diameter is precision and is.... .202 going full length of cap.
3. Base rim diameter is:....... .495
4. With cap off the .202 hole continues into the body.... .961
5. Rim diameter is.... .495 and tapers upward to the straight sided portion a distance of:...... 1.595
I did notice some older caliber stuff in this box including dies and empty cases for a .220 swift.
Could this be a bullet gauge of some kind for the .220 Swift cartridge? It appears to have been commercially made and not homemade.
Any help will be greatly appreciated as I've pondered over this item too long. Thanks for any and all help in identify this unusual item.
 

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Grand Imperial Poobah
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I believe that is a cartridge casing gauge to check casing length and head space .............. for I'm assuming a .220 Swift.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I believe that is a cartridge casing gauge to check casing length and head space .............. for I'm assuming a .220 Swift.
How exactly would it be used? Why the screw-in portion? There is no way an empty case can go into the body of this tool.
 

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I would attempt to drop a loaded cartridge. This MAY be an overall length cartridge die. Note how the base screw is milled out to avoid the primer. If the solid cap on the other end it would lead me to believe the loaded cartridge could be paced in the die (?) and the base screw tightened. Sn over length bullet would be then forced back into the case. if the bullet is seated too deep tapping the die head down would allow then bullet to move forward thus ensuring the proper over all length of the cartridge head spaced on the shoulder of the case.
On the other hand it might be a
On the other hand it might be a case length case trimmer. Does the cap on the large end unscrew? If it does this could be a case crimper. which would explain the bottom screw mill out to avoid the live primer. E.W.A.G.:thumbsup:

Back in the '60s everybody seemed to trying to reinvent the wheel. Some of the neatest, read most useless gun stuff came out during that era.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I would attempt to drop a loaded cartridge. This MAY be an overall length cartridge die. Note how the base screw is milled out to avoid the primer. If the solid cap on the other end it would lead me to believe the loaded cartridge could be paced in the die (?) and the base screw tightened. Sn over length bullet would be then forced back into the case. if the bullet is seated too deep tapping the die head down would allow then bullet to move forward thus ensuring the proper over all length of the cartridge head spaced on the shoulder of the case.
On the other hand it might be a
On the other hand it might be a case length case trimmer. Does the cap on the large end unscrew? If it does this could be a case crimper. which would explain the bottom screw mill out to avoid the live primer. E.W.A.G.:thumbsup:

Back in the '60s everybody seemed to trying to reinvent the wheel. Some of the neatest, read most useless gun stuff came out during that era.
The base is solid all the way to where it flares out and from the flare up section to the knurled removable cap is a perfectly drilled ,202 hole. The base extractor rim is just that but as mentioned solid but tapered up the flare.The upper grove is simply a groove and is not a separation point...only movable part of this thing is the knurled cap. I know the original owner was a varmint hunter and competition shooter as he had (now i own)an unertl 15x and a 'Remington 24XBR scope I'm having to assume question2.JPG e .220 swift too3.JPG tool1.JPG tool2.JPG question3.JPG was his choice and that crazy tool did something for the cartridge.
 

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I would attempt to drop a loaded cartridge. This MAY be an overall length cartridge die. Note how the base screw is milled out to avoid the primer. If the solid cap on the other end it would lead me to believe the loaded cartridge could be paced in the die (?) and the base screw tightened. Sn over length bullet would be then forced back into the case. if the bullet is seated too deep tapping the die head down would allow then bullet to move forward thus ensuring the proper over all length of the cartridge head spaced on the shoulder of the case.
On the other hand it might be a
On the other hand it might be a case length case trimmer. Does the cap on the large end unscrew? If it does this could be a case crimper. which would explain the bottom screw mill out to avoid the live primer. E.W.A.G.:thumbsup:

Back in the '60s everybody seemed to trying to reinvent the wheel. Some of the neatest, read most useless gun stuff came out during that era.
+1
 

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Honestly, I'm pretty new to all of this stuff cause I just got into target shooting during the quarantine months. It was something that's always appealed to me, but I guess I was just too nervous to get started, afraid of embarrassing myself. Now that I had all of this free time it felt just like the perfect opportunity. I don't think I can help with your question, but I wanted to say that all of them seem really interesting, I'd like to be able to recognize them just from a photo, maybe I'll get there. I just invested in the best reloading kit that I could find on the market and I can't wait for it to arrive and try it all out. Do you guys have any tips for beginners?
 

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Live Free
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Honestly, I'm pretty new to all of this stuff cause I just got into target shooting during the quarantine months. It was something that's always appealed to me, but I guess I was just too nervous to get started, afraid of embarrassing myself. Now that I had all of this free time it felt just like the perfect opportunity. I don't think I can help with your question, but I wanted to say that all of them seem really interesting, I'd like to be able to recognize them just from a photo, maybe I'll get there. I just invested in the best reloading kit that I could find on the market and I can't wait for it to arrive and try it all out. Do you guys have any tips for beginners?
Make sure you have a good loading manual and read it. Speer and Hornady manuals have some good instruction in the first half of the book and give a good variety of load data for you to work from. I would strongly urge you to use the data in manuals without deviating from the range of loads listed. If you have good equipment coming, when you get the equipment, take your time setting up shop and make sure you have adequate lighting. Much more can be said as you move forward, just keep asking as you learn and folks here will do their best to help keep you on the right path.

Welcome to NGF!
 
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