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· Pew Pew
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This is not a “what is best” new reloader question. I know there are suggestions on what brands already out there.

Ive Been eyballing the hornaday kit at bass pro for around $300, but i know that’s probably not the cheapest option. I have saved up a few thousand 9mm brass from new ammo shot once and id like to reload it, but i have NOTHING.

I don’t actually know what all i need much less what to get brand and style wise, but i want to see if i like reloading before going big so I’m looking for a bare necessary setup.

i need a press, die, scales, and such, but what about smaller items? Measuring devices, tumbler? I need a comprehensive list of what it would take to get started and need nothing else after.

eliminate primer, bullets, powder from the list because that’s subjective.

Im not asking what is best, just for a list of items that must be had to get going.

thanks in advance! :)
 

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This is not a “what is best” new reloader question. I know there are suggestions on what brands already out there.

Ive Been eyballing the hornaday kit at bass pro for around $300, but i know that’s probably not the cheapest option. I have saved up a few thousand 9mm brass from new ammo shot once and id like to reload it, but i have NOTHING.

I don’t actually know what all i need much less what to get brand and style wise, but i want to see if i like reloading before going big so I’m looking for a bare necessary setup.

i need a press, die, scales,
Thats all you need to get started
and such, but what about smaller items? Measuring devices, tumbler? I need a comprehensive list of what it would take to get started and need nothing else after.

eliminate primer, bullets, powder from the list because that’s subjective.
These are not subjective they are required above all
Im not asking what is best, just for a list of items that must be had to get going.

thanks in advance! :)
 

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You are about to enter the "reloading zone" Lee is definitely the lowest cost solution. Lee offers, Single stage press, one shell at a time. Turret press, one shell through all four stages (size, primer, powder, bullet). Progressive, every pull of the lever produces a finished bullet (most expensive). Others: Hornady, Lyman, Redding, RCBS, Dillion

You will need:
Press - either single stage or Turret
Dies - specific to the caliber you intend to load
Powder measure - a set of dippers or a dispenser
scales - digital or mechanical
Reloading manual - Hornady, Lyman, Lee, Sierra - One of these is a must
Calibers
- digital or Analog

To load:
Primers - 9mm is small pistol
Powder - specified in the manual for the bullet you have chosen
Bullet - type and weight for the caliber you are loading

optional but really necessary:
tumbler or vibrator cleaner - for cleaning the fired brass

You can find most of what you need in a kit (like what Coalcracker posted). I would not go into this as a way to save money on shooting unless you plan to shoot a lot. I don't load 9mm, 45ACP since I can buy new cheaper but I do load all my hunting rounds (.243, 30-06, .223 rifle and .327 federal, .41 magnum) and doing these have saved me enough to recoup the investment.

Just to note, this is a specific endeavor that requires attention to details and not exceeding the loading parameters for a given load. Find a friend or relative that already does this so you can get some hands on. I was taught by my oldest brother, a bench loader. I leave it at this, Hotter is not always better.
 

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^^^This is a good place to start. Or if you want brand new, Titan reloading. Buy any 9mm kit setup you'd like and you get everything you need, including the reloading book with all the information you'll ever need to start reloading. Press selection is like tractor selection, the color options are all subjective. Red, Blue, Green, etc. Everyone will swear their selection is best because it cost's more. That might true, but they all work!

I personally have Lee equipment because it's what I could afford. I have both a Loadmaster and a Classic cast turret. The Loadmaster is not the 'best', but if you like tinkering it's an inexpensive way to get into a progressive press (which I advise against for a first time press). The Classic cast turret press kit is easy to use, can be used as a single stage (recommended), is a four station press regardless how it's used (manually or as a auto-index), and comes complete with everything you need to reload handgun cartridges. But other colors offer similar just at a higher cost.

Anyway, that's not your question...what do you need to get started?

As mentioned before...a suitable press, good quality dies (3 or 4 dies set with a carbide case sizer), scoop measures and/or a good scale (Lee's balance scale is inexpensive, sensitive, and accurate, for as cheap as it is, but there are others), powder funnel, loading blocks (specific to 9mm preferably) Frankford arsenal has good ones for that; combination blocks that hold multiple calibers can be used but they don't hold the cases as firmly while you pour powder into them (BTDT-I don't use them anymore). You will also need a way to deprime the cases, prime the cases, and clean the cases, 9mm cases don't 'normally' need trimmed, so don't worry about that part.

All of what you will need comes in kit form. It's just a matter of how much you are willing invest since you don't even know if you enjoy reloading. $1000 or more for a Dillon setup, or $192.49 for a 9mm Lee Classic cast turret.

ETA- Titan is sold out right now of the Classic Turret. However, they allow ordering it and they are replenishing stock weekly. Just an FYI if you decide to go this route.
 

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Yeah i should have said to look around. I was just trying to give an idea. My turret came from optics planet. They had the best deal at the time. My breech lock kit i think i got it from midway. My little single stage c shape press came from Academy.
 

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Next time you get a credit card offer in the mail sign up for it, you're going to need it so you can save money!

Can't really add much from what was said above except that i am partial to RCBS presses for single stage loading.
 

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If you buy the cheapest product, you'll pay more.

I started out with the cheapest product setup out there and within a coupla three years, I had to buy it all again. I replaced the cheap stuff with RCBS and haven't had to replace any of that product.

--Wag--
 

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Why is that Wag? I've had my Lee stuff for close to ten years. Since I'm not a competitor I don't reload thousands of rounds a week. I maybe do that many in a year. If I was of the type to practice daily I might spring for a more expensive (up front) setup, but for my small demand, I have way more than I need.

I'm going on 'making an ass out of you and me' (assumption) about the OP but it seems maybe like he is an occasional shooter such as I am. I plink when the skeeters aren't too bad out back, mostly early spring and late fall. I'm addicted to buying guns, not shooting them.

Speaking of which...I got my R51, I shot my R51, I like my R51...
 

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different opinions.....you want to get started....dip your toe into the waters so to speak....

1. I would start with a single stage press....LEE brand with ram prime or on-press priming system.

2. a set of carbide dies.......LEE 4 die set with shell holder and dipper supplied. use the dipper with the supplied powder chart.

3. would also purchase a loading block.....mtm brand is plenty good.

4. powder funnel......LEE....its cheap and makes life much easier using the funnel with the powder thru expanding die supplied in the LEE die set.

that is about it.......to start out......that is the bare basics for me.....

you can worry about a tumbler, scale, primer pocket cleaner, brushes, and many other accessories for later....it can wait a tad.....start going with different powders and bullet weights not on the chart.....then get a reloading manual and scales and never stray......you will probably need to get more dippers or go to a different powder system.

the above is more or less bare bones minimal......you can go more primitive and cheaper with the whac-a-mole LEE classic loader and a hammer....and it is slow and tedious.....it works.

you do not have to spend an arm and a leg for every single accessory and gadget starting out.......but you will eventually start adding accessories as you increase production and want include more steps improve quality....

think of it as from going from a crescent wrench, pliers, and screwdriver to a full tool box of every tool imaginable.......
 
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Why is that Wag? I've had my Lee stuff for close to ten years. Since I'm not a competitor I don't reload thousands of rounds a week. I maybe do that many in a year. If I was of the type to practice daily I might spring for a more expensive (up front) setup, but for my small demand, I have way more than I need.

I'm going on 'making an ass out of you and me' (assumption) about the OP but it seems maybe like he is an occasional shooter such as I am. I plink when the skeeters aren't too bad out back, mostly early spring and late fall. I'm addicted to buying guns, not shooting them.

Speaking of which...I got my R51, I shot my R51, I like my R51...
Why is that? Because it's poorly made with respect to material and design and it can't handle the workload without wearing out FAR more quickly than it should.

--Wag--
 

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Why is that? Because it's poorly made with respect to material and design and it can't handle the workload without wearing out FAR more quickly than it should.

--Wag--
Maybe I should have asked which color was the "cheapest one out there"? Lee is inexpensive but not cheap. It's got too much plastic gadgetry, but overall it works good for the occasional shooter. I'm not saying GO LEE! but it all depends on how much a person reloads. A mechanically inept person would be better off buying something foolproof. Lee is not that! Lee takes some tinkering and a mild case of engineering skill. But once the kinks are worked out it functions flawlessly...but that's the price one pays for inexpensive. JMHO
 

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The question is; does that matter? I'm not a high volume shooter. I still prefer loading my own just fun. From many of the responses I see here the overall gist is- 'spend more money like I did'. That's totally unnecessary for a first timer. Especially with a single stage press. I heard that all the time when I asking for advice too - "buy the Dillon 550 because you can't go wrong with it!" Well, yes you can wrong, you can go near bankrupt buying all the add-ons.

If all the advice against Lee is based on old experiences, then those experiences are wrong today. They have upped their game on the metals (the actual presses). Heck, even all the plastic add-ons are getting pretty good for the price point.

Another point is- if it can be bought, it can be sold. The Lee presses won't break unless you are trying to load something they are not designed to load. Are you going to make money when selling one? Not likely. But life really isn't about making money in my book. Maybe by selling for less money more people will get into reloading? It's possible.

The buy once, cry once argument is plausible. However, the buyer really needs to understand that they are serious about reloading for the long term and in higher volumes. As I said, I have a Loadmaster and a turret. I use the turret for decapping and sometimes I prime with it. I also use it for loading .38sp. No real reason for that except I seldom shoot more than 50 rounds a year of .38sp. The Loadmaster is used for 9x19, 9x18, and now .45acp.

Sometimes less is more. But if the cash is flowing freely ...YMMV
Personally, I barely make ends meet on a normal week. And that doesn't mean I'm in debt up to my ears...I only have one small $300 limit credit card, one house mortgage, and a college loan. Nothing fancy sitting in my driveway, no ribeye steaks (arm roast cut into steaks is as close as I can afford) filling my freezer...I survive, I buy some toys, and as my Dad always said...I'll die a pauper...can't take it with me anyway and I'm not about to leave it to anyone since I have nobody to leave it to.

Therefore my gut instinct is to tell people to buy what they can afford, not what I can afford. I'm partial to Lee but it without a doubt a frustrating experience to get the bugs worked out, however, the silver lining is I know exactly how the process is supposed work now.

;) (y) 😊
 

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My only gripe about Lee . Is the stupid plastic ratchet on the turret press. I went through a few real fast. Then i read about changing the turrets with the ram raised. They are now lasting longer. But the plastic clamp is also broke on mine. Gorilla tape fixed it for now.
 
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