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What is the consensus on loading mixed head stamped cases? I have a mixture of head stamped cases give to me and not sure if I should load pure head stamped ammo or is it ok to mix. I size all my shell casings down to the exact size before loading.
 

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Salmon Slayer
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I always sort by head stamps & check for “bulges” caused by some unsupported chambers from earlier Glocks & Sigs.
Very few 40S&W head stamps will have military crimps but inspect your brass accordingly. It is ok to use mixed head stamps just check then before loading.

Years ago I acquired a couple thousand round cases of Winchester ammo, I’ve been reloading them exclusively and sell all the range pick ups that I had acquired.
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I never do, if they are brass i load them. The only sorting i do is in 45acp to separate the large and small primer cases. I do look through my 9mm cases as there is one brand that has a step on the inside of the case which would cause a huge case capacity difference. I think i have found 3 or so in the thousands of cases i use. The only other ones i sort that i can think of right now are 45-70. Hornady leverlution brass is considerably shorter so the case capacity would be much different and you would have to reset your dies for seating and crimping. I don't load .40 but it may be another that can have large and small primers. I remember reading somewhere there is another pistol caliber now that has that but it was one i don't load for.
To me sorting by headstamp is more for the long range precision shooters who have to have everything perfectly matched. Even then they usually sort them by weight, case capacity etc. IMHO doing that is unnecessary for the average shooter.
 

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45acp, 45 LC, 38 spl, 380acp target loads are mixed head stamp with NO nickel plated. 9 mm is all WW brass case, 40 S&W is mixed, brass only, for mild target loads, 180 gr high end loads only in WW brass cases. Has more to do with the volume of brass I have in each caliber. It’s getting time to sort out the 380acp to one headstamp.
9mm and 380acp both have a lot of foreign headstamps of unknown hardness. WW brass has always been softer with more reloading life than Federal, which has more splits from the harder brass case, nickel plated cases also suffer from more splits. Therefore, highly cycled cases for target work get as much WW as I can find, higher end loading that get cycled far fewer times I just keep the headstamp the same.
 

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I don't usually worry about it. These days, I'm mostly making plinkers. If I want accuracy or consistency for other reasons, I sort as much as possible.

--Wag--
 

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Last Stand on Earth
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I’m now loading around 30 calibers. Ironically, I have more 40S&W ammo than any other caliber. I don’t sort them. I do inspect them for bulges and cracks. 40 S&W is a high pressure semi auto cartridge. The gun you shoot it from makes all the difference in the world. High end load data can be dangerous in the wrong gun. There are plenty of guns out there with chambers that aren’t fully supported. You shouldn’t have issue with the brass so long as the gun has a fully supported chamber. That said, inspect any .40 brass you get from somewhere else carefully. Never use a bulged or cracked brass regardless of what someone else might tell you.
 

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have thought the 40 to be one of the better compromise cartridges....bullet weight, diameter, capacity, and such.......

but i have always been rather "spooked" about reloading the 40 and to those ends have not.

probably too much drama on my part, but when the 40 was introduced and the popularity of the glock was taking the market by storm, there just seem to be too many horror stories of kaboom and also i had seen too many bulged cases or that little smiling partial moon look. It did not help that i saw the local game warden's issued glock 22 some years back severely damaged when the magazine was literally blown out the bottom of the mag well with Federal factory loads.
then there was more concern about special bulge buster dies being offered which left me wondering.....i simply decided not to pick up 40 cal range brass and leave it......apparently a whole lot of folks just let it lay as well back then.

i have no idea if today's 40 caliber guns are bulge free or not......

heck of a cartridge though....i still think about picking up a glock 27.....its more of a fleeting thought.
 
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Last Stand on Earth
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have thought the 40 to be one of the better compromise cartridges....bullet weight, diameter, capacity, and such.......

but i have always been rather "spooked" about reloading the 40 and to those ends have not.

probably too much drama on my part, but when the 40 was introduced and the popularity of the glock was taking the market by storm, there just seem to be too many horror stories of kaboom and also i had seen too many bulged cases or that little smiling partial moon look. It did not help that i saw the local game warden's issued glock 22 some years back severely damaged when the magazine was literally blown out the bottom of the mag well with Federal factory loads.
then there was more concern about special bulge buster dies being offered which left me wondering.....i simply decided not to pick up 40 cal range brass and leave it......apparently a whole lot of folks just let it lay as well back then.

i have no idea if today's 40 caliber guns are bulge free or not......

heck of a cartridge though....i still think about picking up a glock 27.....its more of a fleeting thought.
Yeah, Glock and S&W both **** the bed when retrofitting the 40 to 9mm handgun frames by way of unsupported chambers. Sad part is, they are still doing it. Short fat cartridges required the removal of valuable chamber support to facilitate the angle of feeding. That why I caution about certain guns not being safe. There are other handgun manufacturers like Springfield that did it right. It’s not the cartridge, it’s the manufacturers cutting corners to save a buck that put people at risk.
 

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Live Free
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The .40 is a good cartridge in good guns. I have a CZ P-07 and a Springfield XD Mod. 2 that properly support the cartridge in chamber. I like shooting .40, especially from the P-07.
 

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OP, please refer to this thread on the unsupported chamber issue. It was the first time I ran into the issue. After much scratching my head, culprit turned out to be a S&W that didn’t belong to me. Note that I mentioned a few cases that actually cracked/ruptured after being shot from the S&W.

 

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The .40 is a good cartridge in good guns. I have a CZ P-07 and a Springfield XD Mod. 2 that properly support the cartridge in chamber. I like shooting .40, especially from the P-07.
I think I have 13 Springfields, 4 or 5 in .40. They make a good gun. I’d choose them over a Glock or S&W any day of the week.
 

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I have wondered if part of the reason (though not publicly spoken of) for the .40 waning usage among law enforcement and subsequent popularity fade are impacted by a lack of trust in the firearms because a few went kaboom. In reality, the .40 is not that difficult to shoot in service pistols and round count in the mag is not that significantly less than a 9mm. Obviously price of ammo is a factor, but I have often wondered about the supposed “too much gun” idea. Anyway, just ruminating a bit. That is enough, I don’t want to derail this thread…
 

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My guess is, yes, that has a lot to do with it. 40 is a bit snappier than 9mm but in a full size it’s absolutely manageable. I remember about 2 years ago reading about a large police department sending back an entire order of new handguns for their officers due to a myriad of issue they didn’t disclose.
 

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Salmon Slayer
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have thought the 40 to be one of the better compromise cartridges....bullet weight, diameter, capacity, and such.......

but i have always been rather "spooked" about reloading the 40 and to those ends have not.

probably too much drama on my part, but when the 40 was introduced and the popularity of the glock was taking the market by storm, there just seem to be too many horror stories of kaboom and also i had seen too many bulged cases or that little smiling partial moon look. It did not help that i saw the local game warden's issued glock 22 some years back severely damaged when the magazine was literally blown out the bottom of the mag well with Federal factory loads.
then there was more concern about special bulge buster dies being offered which left me wondering.....i simply decided not to pick up 40 cal range brass and leave it......apparently a whole lot of folks just let it lay as well back then.

i have no idea if today's 40 caliber guns are bulge free or not......

heck of a cartridge though....i still think about picking up a glock 27.....its more of a fleeting thought.
Do you mean these horror stories?
10mm for the win!!! :D
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I have noticed over the years that many .40's have literally gone to pieces when firing. Many can be explained by someone inserting a 9mm mag into a .40 but many are not which always had me wondering why?
 
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I owned several (6 or 8, I forget) Sig-Sauer pistols chambered in .40 S&W. I changed them all to .357 SIG, a superior cartridge to .40 S&W. in my mind. I'm glad I bought several cases of .357 SIG ammo at a discounted price. Try to find it today at any price.

I own a NIB, bright stainless, Browning Hi-Power chambered in .40 S&W. Its too pretty to dispose of.
 
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