National Gun Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My grandfather just passed away and I was given his rifle. I know nothing about this particular rifle and am unable identify either the company that manufactured it or it’s caliber. I would really appreciate any information that could help me better understand what I’ve been given.
125117
125118
125119
125120
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,861 Posts
It's a P-14 or P-17 Enfield (What is its chambering?). Someone did a good job sporterizing it. Sometimes gunsmiths will put their name and other info under the butt plate.

Alan
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stevejet

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Like Alan said either a P14 or a U.S. model 1917 rifle which is based on the P14 Enfield design. The builder put a lot of work into the rifle with shortening up the magazine.
 

·
AZHerper
Joined
·
4,706 Posts
An unresolved issue exists because the P14s were chambered in .303 British and the P17s (Model 1917) were 30-06. Any good gunsmith can check the chamber and tell you which it is. The .303 British is a semi=rimmed case and the 30-06 is rimless.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,861 Posts
I suppose it will remain unresolved.

Alan
 

·
Ancient Gaseous Emanation
Joined
·
55,659 Posts
I believe the ratio of M17 to P14 rifles released to the public in the US is approximately 1000 to 1. Therefore, odds are, your rifle is a nicely sporterized M17.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gvaldeg1

·
Ancient Gaseous Emanation
Joined
·
55,659 Posts
It is also possible that your rifle is a Remington Model 30.



The Remington Model 30 is a US sporting rifle of the inter-war period based on the military P14/M1917 Enfield rifle action, which was manufactured for the British and US governments during World War I. Initial specimens used surplus military parts with some modifications in order to consume the stock of parts, though further modifications were made as production progressed and later rifles were produced from newly manufactured parts. Most early rifles were in the military .30-06 caliber used in the M1917 but it became available in a variety of chamberings. It was the first high-powered bolt-action sporting rifle produced by Remington.

 
  • Like
Reactions: Coalcracker

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,861 Posts
That would be cool. If it's milsurp someone did some heavy duty grinding on the receiver. If it's Mod 30 they restocked. It would be interesting to see the front sight if it is present. Also a Mod 30 would have barrel markings, I guess. I keep trying to see that little dip in the top of the rear receiver.

Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
366 Posts
I'd say it was a P-14 or P-17 except for the fact that they have a distinct wood shape around the magazine area, (Its still apparent in sportorized ones) Yeah Popeye I think I agree its a Model 30. Oddly similar to the '14 and '17 though.
 

·
Ancient Gaseous Emanation
Joined
·
55,659 Posts
The stock is aftermarket.
I believe the rifle is a nicely sporterized Model 1917.
The metal on the first Model 30 rifles was all surplus M1917 parts (some modified).
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,861 Posts
I looked at my p-17 Sporter today. I think the rifle in question is a p-17 also.

Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
I'd say it was a P-14 or P-17 except for the fact that they have a distinct wood shape around the magazine area, (Its still apparent in sportorized ones)
That Enfield "Magazine Hump" is found on military models. Many custom sporters based on either the P14 or M1917 had the magazine shortened by one round which eliminates the "Enfield Hump". P14's were chosen mostly for Enfield sporters in magnum calibers due to the larger bolt face eliminating the need to open up the bolt face for magnum cartridges. Also many custom Enfield sporters have had that dogleg bolt handle replaced with a more common style bolt handle.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top