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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not a collector, but I have a worthless old .22 rifle made by Page-Lewis Co., and I'm curious about the manufacture date. I've read that this company was started in 1920 and lasted for 6 years. However, "MODEL 1915" is stamped on the gun. Usually, Model followed by a date usually implies the the startup year for the particular model. Can anyone clarify this ?

Old_.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info. I guess the early Winchester line of lever guns '66, '73,'86,'92, and '94 wavered somewhat from your statement about model and date of introduction.
 

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Thanks for the info. I guess the early Winchester line of lever guns '66, '73,'86,'92, and '94 wavered somewhat from your statement about model and date of introduction.
But these Winchester rifle model numbers go to prove my point.

Model 51 "Imperial" (1919) bolt-action rifle
Model 52 (1920) bolt-action .22 match rifle
Model 53 (1924) lever-action rifle (Model 92 variant)
Model 54 (1925) bolt-action rifle
Model 55 (1924) lever-action rifle (Model 94 variant)
Model 56 (1926) bolt-action .22 rifle
Model 57 (1926) bolt-action .22 target rifle (Model 56 target variant)
Model 58 (1928) bolt-action single-shot .22 rifle
Model 59 (1930) bolt-action single-shot .22 rifle (Model 58 target variant)
Model 60 (1930) bolt-action .22 rifle (Model 58 variant)
Model 60A (1933) bolt-action .22 single shot rifle (Model 58 variant)
Model 61 (1932) slide-action .22 WCF (later .22 rimfire and .22 WMR) rifle
Model 62 (1932) slide-action .22 rifle (Model 90 variant)
Model 62A (1940) slide-action .22 rifle (Model 90 variant)
Model 63 (1933) semi-automatic .22 rifle (Model 03 variant)
Model 64 (1933) lever-action rifle (Model 94 variant)
Model 65 (1933) lever-action rifle (Model 92 variant)
Model 67 (1934) bolt-action .22 rifle
Model 677 (1937) bolt-action .22 rifle (telescopic-sight-only Model 67 variant)
Model 68 (1934) bolt-action .22 rifle (Model 67 variant)
Model 69 (1935) bolt-action .22 rifle
Model 697 (1937) bolt-action .22 rifle (telescopic-sight-only Model 69 variant)
Model 70 (1936) bolt-action rifle
Model 71 (1935) lever-action rifle (Model 86 variant)
Model 72 (1938) bolt-action .22 rifle
Model 74 (1939) semi-automatic .22 rifle
Model 75 (1938) bolt-action .22 target rifle
Model 43 (1949) bolt-action rifle
Model 47 (1949) bolt-action single-shot .22 rifle
Model 55 (1957) semi-automatic single-shot .22 rifle
Model 77 (1955) semi-automatic .22 rifle
Model 88 (1955) hybrid lever-action rifle
Model 100 (1960) semi-automatic rifle
Model 250 (1963) lever-action .22 rifle
Model 270 (1963) slide-action .22 rifle
Model 290 (1963) semi-automatic .22 rifle
Model 121 (1967) bolt-action single shot .22 rifle
Model 131 (1967) bolt-action .22 rifle (repeating Model 121 variant, box magazine)
Model 141 (1967) bolt-action .22 rifle (repeating Model 121 variant), butt stock tube fed rifle.
Model 150 (1967) lever-action .22 rifle (Model 250 variant)
Model 190 (1966) semi-automatic .22 rifle
Model 255 (1964) lever-action .22 WMR rifle (Model 250 variant)
Model 310 (1972) single shot .22 rifle
Model 320 (1972) bolt-action .22 rifle 5 or 10 round box magazine
Model 325 (1972) bolt-action .22 WMR rifle (Model 320 variant)
Model 490 (1975) semi-automatic .22 rifle
Model 670 (1966) bolt-action rifle
Model 770 (1969) bolt-action rifle
Model 9422 (1972) lever-action .22 rifle

Do you want me to run S&W handgun model numbers?
 

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No such thing as a worthless firearm, they can be used for clubs, boat paddles, crutches, pry bars,you name it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, I'm well aware that the big majority of Winchester guns model id have nothing to do with date, but of course, some of the early ones did. I have a model 1200 shotgun, and I've always just assumed that it was produced in the year 1200.
 

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Yes, I'm well aware that the big majority of Winchester guns model id have nothing to do with date, but of course, some of the early ones did. I have a model 1200 shotgun, and I've always just assumed that it was produced in the year 1200.
You're kidding?
 

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Yes, I'm well aware that the big majority of Winchester guns model id have nothing to do with date, but of course, some of the early ones did. I have a model 1200 shotgun, and I've always just assumed that it was produced in the year 1200.
:laughing:
 

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Kidding ? Yea , guess I am - i just couldn't resist displaying my exaggorated ignorance over such matters.
 

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Is that AD or BC?
 

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Here is some history for you. https://www.pbs.org/opb/historydetectives/technique/gun-timeline/
More at the link. Please enjoy.

Gun Timeline
Historical timeline of the development of modern weapons starting at 1364 with the first recorded use of a firearm and ending in 1892 with the introduction of automatic handguns.

1364 - First recorded use of a firearm.
1380 - Hand guns are known across Europe.
1400s - The matchlock gun appears.

Before the matchlock, guns were fired by holding a burning wick to a "touch hole" in the barrel igniting the powder inside. A shooter uses one hand for firing, and a prop to steady the gun.The first device, or "lock," for mechanically firing a gun is the matchlock. Powder is held in a "flash pan," and ignited by a wick, or match, in a movable clamp. Both hands remain on the gun, vastly improving aim. Early matchlock guns are extremely rare. The matchlock shown here was made around 1640, and is typical of the muskets used by militia in Colonial America.
 
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