National Gun Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
22,106 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Editorial - Orange County Register

Sensible reform idea: have the police to do less

One of the more intriguing police-reform ideas to emerge in the wake of George Floyd’s death is remarkable for its simplicity.

Many troubling incidents occur after officers respond to minor disturbances involving mentally ill people or non-criminal matters. Why not skip the cops and instead call social workers or mentalhealth professionals?

It’s a common-sense question asked not only by reformers, but by prominent police officials. “We’re asking cops to do too much in this country,” Dallas police Chief David Brown said four years ago. “Here in Dallas we got a loose dog problem; let’s have the cops chase loose dogs. Schools fail, let’s give it to the cops ... Policing was never meant to solve all these problems.”

Fortunately, more localities realize it might be time not only to consider better police strategies, but non-police strategies, as well. San Francisco officials have approved a plan to use trained, unarmed social-work professionals to respond to routine calls involving homeless people, disputes between neighbors and school discipline issues. It has the police chief’s backing. Cities including Oakland, Sacramento and Los Angeles are considering similar models.

It’s not a new idea. Thirty years ago, Eugene, Oregon, a college town of 172,000 people, began staffing an old van with unarmed medics and counselors to respond to suicide threats, drug-addiction and homeless issues — “problems for which there are no easy fixes” and that “in the hands of police have often turned violent,” according to a recent CNN report. The city has expanded this program. By most estimates, it is remarkably successful.

The nation finally seems ready to consider alternative approaches. There are myriad potential benefits. It’s easier to send trained social workers to deal with a minor incident than it is to retrain every police officer into being a de facto social worker. It’s likely to reduce violent encounters.

These policies would reduce the amount of time police agencies spend on minor disturbances and let them focus instead on serious crime. As the Los Angeles Times reported, “police accounted for more than 90%” of the $21 million that San Francisco spent over one year to enforce homeless-related laws. That’s a misuse of police resources. They are among the costliest services any city provides, so such reforms could result in cost savings.

The Legislature is considering Assembly Bill 2054, which creates pilot programs to deploy counselors and other nonpolice staff to deal with homelessness, natural disasters and other crisis situations. “This bill is designed to de-escalate crises, reduce reactive violence, and to send vital services to people who have a tougher time accessing critically needed emergency services,” said its author, Sydney Kamlager-Dove, D-Los Angeles, in a statement.

This measure has bipartisan backing. We like the concept and pilot projects in general, given they provide a way to test new ideas before rolling them out across the state. The Federal Communications Commission has developed an emergency 988 hotline. It’s similar to 911, but is reserved for mental-health emergencies — a sensible idea given that around a quarter of the people killed by police officers were experiencing mental problems. There’s no simple fix to the nation’s policing problems, but creating alternative options to non-violent incidents is a humane, cost-effective and noncontroversial way to start.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
9,954 Posts
I say defund, disband, eliminate all of the police. Let’s see how this grand experiment works out. What could go wrong? People are generally good and will be civil and fair with each other. We could all get together and have s’more’s over a campfire and sing Kumbaya. It will be a huge love fest.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
This is just more stupid leftist brain flatulence. The role of police is to be law enforcement, first responders, period. That is all they ever should have been. All these pundits should meditate on that for a while. Cops were never intended to be social workers, counselors, baby sitters, dog catchers, etc.

All those expectations came about through a lot of do-gooder movements in the 60's and 70's around "community oriented policing." It sounded like a good idea at the time, but it quickly went off the rails. Police lost track of their main mission, which is underlined above. Now we don't have a satisfactory service for any of those expectations.

I say let cops get back to doing what they do best and let social services do they do best. If there is immediate violence, danger and serious law violations involved, send in the cops. If it is not any of those, send in the social workers. Protect the cops from legal liability, but also hold them accountable.

I will also opine that the time has passed for cops to do routine traffic speed limit enforcement. That demeans their role. Dangerous driving and drunk driving, yes, but not speed traps and not busted tail lights. All that can be done with automated systems now. We may need a few laws modified for that, but so be it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,425 Posts
Let's have a lower tier police that focus only on traffic and similar citations and only have serious cops for the utmost serious scenarios. Since most law enforcement involving crimes are after the fact, then it seems most LEO efforts should be more like forensics and crime scene investigations. No need to bother with detectives trying to bring down criminals ahead of time as prosecutors only let them go anyway
 

· Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
Let's have a lower tier police that focus only on traffic and similar citations and only have serious cops for the utmost serious scenarios. Since most law enforcement involving crimes are after the fact, then it seems most LEO efforts should be more like forensics and crime scene investigations. No need to bother with detectives trying to bring down criminals ahead of time as prosecutors only let them go anyway
They will eventually need detectives to track down people who did not turn in their guns when ordered to. And those cases will get prosecuted.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
4,756 Posts
Let start sending "unarmed social workers" to solve "minor" calls, let us see how many of those "unarmed social workers" wind up dead after they respond to those calls.
For some reason, I do not think that the MSM will report on those cases.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,425 Posts
They will eventually need detectives to track down people who did not turn in their guns when ordered to. And those cases will get prosecuted.
Nope, they'll just request BATFE assistane in that
 

· Registered
Joined
·
899 Posts
Nope, they'll just request BATFE assistane in that
Interesting you should say that. You may be right, but BATFE only has about 2,600 agents, which is about one for every 46,000 gun owners. And they still have to do alcohol, tobacco and explosives as well as firearms. So they are spread really thin.

I think that is the reason Bloomberg is pushing states to pass gun restrictions that mirror federal restrictions, as well as other stuff. He knows BAFTE will never be able to handle what he has in mind.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,425 Posts
Interesting you should say that. You may be right, but BATFE only has about 2,600 agents, which is about one for every 46,000 gun owners. And they still have to do alcohol, tobacco and explosives as well as firearms. So they are spread really thin.

I think that is the reason Bloomberg is pushing states to pass gun restrictions that mirror federal restrictions, as well as other stuff. He knows BAFTE will never be able to handle what he has in mind.
But then that justifies yet another gov't agency to enlarge its staff thus building a bigger empire for their boss - which is how success and importance are measured in government - it isn't if you actually do anything, it is the number of direct reports and how big your budget of tax money is. Anyone who has worked for a large corporation understands that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
that right....have the police do less.........

in other news, Dunkin' Donuts has begun an aggressive expansion........ :LOL:

sorry....could not resist as i was formally constantly bombarded with doughnut jokes....

but i will say this......the law enforcement community is wearing too many hats. The cited homeless issues and especially the mental health issues and a whole lot of rather stupid city ordinance issues along with more mandates from the State and the feds just keep adding up.

every time a law is passed, it falls on law enforcement to enforce. every time something needs to be addressed, it seems that law enforcement is given the burden as a "first responder".

Now, I hate a growing and spreading govt bureaucracy that springs forth multi agencies that have already created the alphabet gang......but at the same time, you do not keep packing on freight onto a lone mule till he breaks his back or has become so over-burden that he can not walk straight and is even slower than he was in getting the job done...it does not matter how much you feed him if the burden is too great......the work becomes slow and sloppy.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wag

· Registered
Joined
·
6,726 Posts
if that worker was handing out $1000 checks along with a democrat voter registration card........yes.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,425 Posts
So I have to ask the question, would the issue at the Wendy's in Alanta have gone any better for a civilian social worker?
It wouldn't have spurred riots, especially if the social worker was black
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top