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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello :)
I am looking for a good gun recommendation for my needs.
I want to get a hand gun for protection. But first I want to be comforatable with a gun, and I plan on going to the shooting range by my house and do some target practice.
So here is what I want :) :
-Something Good For Target practice
-easy to use for a beginner like me
-Something not too bulky
hmm I really don't know what else, but please ask and I shall answer :)

Also once Im comforatble I want to get a gun for home protection, so I want something that's semi-automatic, again easy to use, something thats deadly, or at least diabling that will give me a chance to flee. Haha
SOrry if I sound dumb, I am COMPLETELY new to gun ownership. I do plan on taking a class etc. etc.
But it would be nice to hear from experirience gun owners :)
 

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Welcome and you will get lots of advice on here and most will be good. Start with a NRA certified instructor. Learn the safety aspects first. Most start with a .22 and move up as experience grows if that is possible. There are lots of good guns and they all have different aspects to them. So I recommend patience and research. Find a place that rents guns and a very experienced friend can be helpful but remember you have to do the work and research to gain the knowledge you will need.Oh and PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. Look up Dry firing that will help more than you can Imagine. Welcome and Godspeed.
 

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Ancient Gaseous Emanation
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If the range near your house rents firearms, take advantage of their rentals. Shoot as many different handguns as you possibly can before you purchase one. Look at it as test driving.
 

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All very sound advice. Please, take a course and learn gun safety first. As the old saying goes , " I`m sorry" does not quite cut it when someone gets shot, whether accidentally or on purpose. You are not handling a rubber dart gun. Good luck and ask questions.
 

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I think you should start with a 22 they are a chep guns to shoot and they can be pretty easy to learn to use . But they are wright need to learn the basics first thin go from there and well come to guns
 

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You know my grammar sucks. But I feel better now.
 

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22's are great starter guns, and cheap to shoot. That said, If I had to pick one
gun that was easy to shoot and had some power I would get:

4" double action 357 magnum revolver with adjustable sights.

Personally I'm partial to K frame Smith and Wessons, model 19 or 67 would fit
the description. Ruger, Dan Wesson, Taurus also make them.

You can shoot light 38 special loads or cowboy action loads for practice, all the
way up to 357 magnum for serious social work.

It's one of those guns that you will keep, even after you move on to semi-auto's
 

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Welcome to the forum. My response to your questions is what I've always advocated... and some parts of it have already been suggested.


This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike.

Get some basic training FIRST. At this point you need fundamentals, not run and gun, or force on force. Reputable instructors will provide a host of handguns and holsters for you to experience in class. That will give you some idea of where your preferences might lead you in handgun selection. Then.....

Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion... again....get some training......proper shooting techniques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right. Most gun shops have a box of used holsters that you can experiment with after you've chosen what gun works best for you. There are many options for concealed/open carry.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there. Caliber doesn't count until after you can hit your target.

If you're buying a handgun for home protection, and you choose to NOT have it on your person, you should consider where in your home you might be if someone kicks the door in. I don't see a person in a position to be able to ask an intruder to "hang on a sec, while I get my gun"

There always will be a trade-off..... light weight, more recoil...... shorter barrel, more recoil...I've known more than a few gents who didn't care for the recoil of what's often called a "ladies gun"... just sayin....

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....
 

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I would definately recommend a 22 to start with. Something like a ruger sr22, walther p22 etc. something that resembles an actual handgun not a buckmark that looks like a space lazer gone bad. The look and feel will carry over to an extent when you move up to a comparible weapon in a different caliber.

The down side of a 22 is not a lot of knockdown power. The upside is its cheap, and no recoil. You can put multiple rounds on target with minimal recoil, or flash. Shoot someone 3 times with a 22 and trust me they are having a bad day. The cheap part, man you can shoot hundreds of rounds for the price of dozens of rounds of a bigger caliber. Nothing beats being able to actually practice, and thus HIT your target.
 
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