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So today is my birthday. Yesterday my wife said I could buy a gun at the pawnshop😁. So I bought three. A pawnshop about 50 miles from me does evidence/confiscation buys from local LE agencies and they have the “bargain section”. And I am needing to have some other pieces to showcase my work. A lot of these guns are absolute junk: missing parts, JB weld repairs, solid blocks of rust. Some, the only thing that classifies them as a firearm is there is a readable serial number. But there’s a few gems in there.

So I walked away with a Smith&Wesson 4013 .40 cal, an old Smith&Wesson .32 long pistol, and a Stevens 12 gauge pump shotgun with choked barrel. All for 600.00

They are in rough but very restorable shape. I think I found my new favorite place.
View attachment 138318
View attachment 138319
View attachment 138320
That old S&W needs lots of love, but that is the one I would focus on. I hope the bore is good. If not those barrels pop up from time to time.
Looks great have fun.
 

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I agree, Northtidesix. Last night, as soon as I got it home, I stripped the handles off and soaked it in CLP. The cylinder release was frozen but after soaking and some gentle but repeated tapping with a brass drift punch I got it to break loose and was able to remove the cylinder assembly. Internals look pretty decent, bore has some wear but looks serviceable.
When I get one badly rusted, I put it in a sealed tank full of ATF then let it cook for a few days, sometimes weeks. The hot sun in a sealed ATF container will dissolve lots of grime, corrosion and rust. ATF is the best cleaning solvent I ever came across.
 

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Here ya go. BTW, got my answer on the model and ship date for the revolver. It is a 1903 Smith & Wesson (shipped in 1906) .32 cal Long Hand Ejector, 6 screw 1st Change.
(Over 116-118 years old). Now fully functional and shootable. Still need to get the letter from S&W to get the original recipient and establish some provenance on it.
It looks great. Everytime I do one of these old timers I find myself thinking: If you could only talk....What a story they could tell us.
Good job another piece of history recovered.
 

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So, on to the next fun project: A 1923 Walther PP Model 4, 3rd Variant. This one is gonna be a challenge:

1st it's all in pieces. View attachment 140133

Second: Oops. The hammer is broken in two spots. View attachment 140134
So, since I can’t find a hammer anywhere for this pistol, I am gonna fabricate one. Client said “ if you can fix it that would be great, if not give it a good cleaning”

Challenge accepted, good sir. I have been waiting to put my hand scraping, metal hardening, and machining skills to the test.
Doc,
In the past I have taken this type of damage to a jewelry fabricator that was able to braze weld the small parts. Even bridging the broken out parts. I would bet, as a last ditch, a silversmith could repair this hammer. What do you have to lose if you cannot fabricate the part? I rescued an '86 Winchester .38/70 (talk about a rare bird) cartridge lifter in 1977. Silver welded the broken piece on the tip. It was still shooting in the 1990's when I sold it.
They really are worth the effort.
Roy
 

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Northtidesix, I will definitely look in to that.

My concern is that this is the hammer, and I am not sure brazing will hold up to the forces generated on that part and that bottom pin enclosure is so fine and those little pieces are nonexistent with the pile I received.

And, I’ll admit it, I am looking forward to the challenge of the process. I haven’t done this level of precision in a while and I get to break out my machinists box. Already sourcing the steel, going to use a 1095 because I can heat treat it and forge the rough shape first ( buying enough for at least 10 of them for the oops factor)
Doc,
I know what you mean about the Ooops! and Challenge. I started out to rescue ONE 1890 Winchester and ONE 1912 Remington. I wound up doing a dozen of each. Needless to say several family members got antique pump .22's for Christmas for a couple of years. ;) The jeweler is just something outside the box I came up with out of desperation. Just bear in mind these projects keep us busy, and it beats the hell out of making coasters out of popsicle sticks in a retirement home.
Roy
 

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Its always worth an email or a phone call to check. Parts houses often have some parts with insufficient quantity to list on their website.
Numrich Gun Parts stresses that point on their catalog site. I liked the old way of ordering parts from them. Call it in and if they had it they sent it C.O.D. That was a last ditch try at a long-term project. They also sent out a notice if they did not have it.
Roy
 

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C.O.D., now there is a blast from the past. I used to order lots of things like that, especially car parts from Summit and Jegs. I think companies getting burned on shipping costs for non-payment and UPS drivers getting robbed stopped that.
I did something similar when I was doing my gun parts/lead recycling business. I mail the part or lead to the direct sale customer. If the part met their approval, they mail me a check. If it didn't, they mailed the part back. Same went for the lead bars or sinkers. If they failed to send the check or the part, I threw away their address and blocked the email. I never got stiffed. I was selling the recycled lead at 50% below the going price on ebay. While using the Numrich pricing guide for the gun parts. Not trying to get rich off every transaction, just financing my gun buying habit.;)
Roy
 
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