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Discussion Starter #1
Deer walks out at 200yrds, and another walks out at 300yrds. Your rifle is zero'ed at 100yrds, and your 200yrd mil is your 2nd mil dot. What mil will you use next to take out the second deer.

Mil layout
. 1
. 2
. 3
. 4
. 5
+ Center
. 6
. 7
. 8
. 9
. 10

What I'm trying to ask here is what direction do you count your mil dots bottom to top or vise versa? Also with the second deer being further away you'll have to go down the mils to compensate for drop right? And vise versa

I also would appreciate it if you leave your snarky comments out I'm just trying to learn. I Apologize in advance if this question offends any vegans on here.

Thank you,
Rob
 

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AZHerper
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When you enter a forum with a "snarky" comment like "I also would appreciate it if you leave your snarky comments out I'm just trying to learn."; I think that you're revealing a lot about yourself. You may actually be OK but you're setting off my troll alert.
 

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Grand Imperial Poobah
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It depends on the caliber/ammo type that you are using.

As for mildot counting, I make the crosshairs 0 and count out from there. Example .....

Mil layout
-5
-4
-3
-2
-1
0 Center
1
2
3
4
5
 

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Let there be no mistake, there is no scope that will magically solve the bullet drop equation. Every caliber and load for that caliber will have different elements that effect the drop of the bullet. There are some range finder scopes that can compute the aim point based on caliber, bullet, range and wind. The Burris Eliminator is probably the most known. As MAD says above, sight the rifle to the center and then test each mil-dot at expanding ranges to determine where it fits.

I use Nikon scopes on my hunting rifles, each with the BDC reticle. Nikon has an app that allows me to input the cartridge specifics, sight in range and will print me a chart showing the range for each dot.

BDC reticle.png
Note: this is an example

I have this taped to the stock and using my range finder, will help me determine the shot. Example: My deer rifle (.243 Savage 110) is sighted for 150yrds. Last week when checking cameras I had a pig come out at about 300 yrds. Using the chart I was able to determine that I needed to use the second dot down for the shot. The pig did not appreciate that.

The other thing you need to discover is what particular load you rifle likes then sight the rifle and do your test. You will be better equipped to make the shot and be successful.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
there are no instructions up2it, I'm making these scenarios up to gain knowledge and peoples insight. although I am going to buy a first focal plan mrad scope at cabelas probably this week.
 

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You will burn a lot of ammo trying to get what you want, if that's what you want. READ anything associated with distance shooting and you will find some answers but not all.

So What if you didn't ask about some imaginary way things MIGHT be and just go find it on your own? Thousands on here and thousands of different answers and not all right or wrong.

When someone asks you how does the Kate shoot, the only answer can be---depends on who is doing the shooting.
 

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So what you havn't told us is what rifle and caliber you plan on mounting this scope on?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a 1500 howa chambered in a .338 Winchester magnum. I think I might buy a 6.5 creedmor or something a little smaller though because it is not cheap to shoot that .338. And what are you trying to say up2it lol. Is it not smart to ask for peoples experienced opinion / advice ...
 

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The 6.5 creed would be a good choice for distance shooting and reloading can take the bite out of the cost of ammunition. Just about everything I shoot except 9mm, 45ACP and 22 is reloaded.
 

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part of a series.
 

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You will burn a lot of ammo trying to get what you want, if that's what you want. READ anything associated with distance shooting and you will find some answers but not all.

So What if you didn't ask about some imaginary way things MIGHT be and just go find it on your own? Thousands on here and thousands of different answers and not all right or wrong.

When someone asks you how does the Kate shoot, the only answer can be---depends on who is doing the shooting.
Questions OK but will noy get you what you are asking for.
 

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I believe what he is saying is retail on factory ammo is $2.25 per round and up. You can load you own buying all the components for ~$1.30 and up and once you accumulate enough brass it gets a lot cheaper, like $.50 per round.
 

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It would be much cheaper. probably save half to two thirds of buying ammo. What do you pay, $50 or so per box? Of course you have to invest in the set up. If you shoot a box a year it won't be worth it but if you shoot a box a week it will.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah your math sounds about right zhill and square. I do plan on loading my own eventually but it will be a pretty penny to start. Any suggestions on a good loader?
 

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Something that is frequently said is that reloading doesn't save you any real money but it does let you shoot a lot more. I've found this to be true, more or less. As mentioned above, the more you shoot, the more you save. Just a function of time.

But,

Reloading is a hobby unto itself. It has it's own sense of satisfaction and reward. Along with its own costs and time requirements. In other words, there's a lot more to reloading than just saving some money. :wink: (Worth noting that when calculating the cost of hand made ammo, people commonly ignore the value of their time spent reloading, partly because it IS a hobby unto itself.)

When I first started reloading, I did it to save money but it wasn't long after that I realized that my ammo was much more accurate than factory ammo, realized that I could fine tune my ammo to each firearm to increase accuracy as well as to the person shooting.

Short version is, there is much more to reloading that just saving a handful of cash......

--Wag--
 

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Something that is frequently said is that reloading doesn't save you any real money but it does let you shoot a lot more. I've found this to be true, more or less. As mentioned above, the more you shoot, the more you save. Just a function of time.

But,

Reloading is a hobby unto itself. It has it's own sense of satisfaction and reward. Along with its own costs and time requirements. In other words, there's a lot more to reloading than just saving some money. :wink: (Worth noting that when calculating the cost of hand made ammo, people commonly ignore the value of their time spent reloading, partly because it IS a hobby unto itself.)

When I first started reloading, I did it to save money but it wasn't long after that I realized that my ammo was much more accurate than factory ammo, realized that I could fine tune my ammo to each firearm to increase accuracy as well as to the person shooting.

Short version is, there is much more to reloading that just saving a handful of cash......

--Wag--


Agree and disagree. it depends and how much you would normally shoot versus how much more you shoot after you reload and what calibers you shoot/load for. I can go to the range and shoot 100 45 colt and it costs me much less than buying the one box i would normally shoot. I can shoot 2 boxes of 7.7 jap instead of one but i can load 5 boxes for what one cost. I shoot more and still save but of course if you shoot much much more you're just shooting the savings. Now if you're loading and shooting a lot of 9mm, 45 acp or other cheap mass produced ammo you'll probably end up breaking even at best but still be able to shoot more. it will and can be different for everyone.

As far as what set up to get you can get by with anything that's out there. Anytime someone is talking about loading bigger calibers like .338 i would recommend something strong like a RCBS rock chucker. The sizing step put the most force on the press so you don't want to skimp and it will outlast you and your kids will load on it someday. I'm partial to the green and there are others that will last and work perfectly fine but you don't want to just buy the cheapest press you can find.
 
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