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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am having trouble getting the scope mounted properly on my 10/22. It is the carbine model and I am using the factory scope base. I can bolt everything together and thought everything was good. Then for a reason I cannot identify, I looked through the scope into a full length mirror and noticed the reticle of the scope is high and to the right in relation to the end of the barrel. Now, I'm new at all this still, but I'm sure that this is very wrong. The 'X' below is the end of the barrel the 'O' is the intersection of the cross hair:


----O

X

-----------
What am I doing wrong?
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
I am having trouble getting the scope mounted properly on my 10/22. It is the carbine model and I am using the factory scope base. I can bolt everything together and thought everything was good. Then for a reason I cannot identify, I looked through the scope into a full length mirror and noticed the reticule of the scope is high and to the right in relation to the end of the barrel. Now, I'm new at all this still, but I'm sure that this is very wrong. The 'X' below is the end of the barrel the 'O' is the intersection of the cross hair:


----O

X

-----------
What am I doing wrong?

A nice bore sight tool would clear up that problem for you. The kit will insure your scope cross hairs are level with the device that fits on the end of the barrel of the rifle. Then if you have the laser that fits into the end of the barrel you can project that out 25-30 yards and dial the scope in very quickly.

I have used line and bubble levels to help before I had the laser bore sighter. I would put the line level on the rifle in a home made mount to make sure the rifle was level. Then I would put the bubble level on the top of the scope vertical adjustment cap and to sure the scope was level on the rifle. That would put it pretty darn close to straight and level.

You may have to move the scope forward or back in its rings or on the mount itself. If all the levels read a level condition then the rest of the adjustment to bring the rifle on target is in the vertical and horizontal adjustment in the scope.

Sounds to me you have the scope rotated on its axis a bit.

Most gun shops will do a bore sight for you for a small fee, or you can buy your own kit for $30-60.
 

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Dong Tam, RSVN '69/'70
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3,428 Posts
Assuming you have checked the bases to make sure both screws are in each one and they are tight, and assuming the scope mounts are both in the slots of the bases correctly I would then check the drilled and taped holes for the mount bases.

Take a long straight edge (I use a 36 inch T-square) and line it up with the screw holes in the receiver. If the straight edge is centered over the barrel all the way out to the end they are true. Sometimes the holes get drilled off center.

Once you know the holes, bases, and mounts are true, look at the scope. If it is used, inexpensive, or been dropped check the cross hair adjustments. Look through the scope on the rifle (preferably while the rifle is in a stand of some sort), note where the cross hairs meet, turn the windage adjustment screw and see if the POA changes. If it does then attempt to sight in the rifle using the windage and elevation adjustments.

If none of this works buy or borrow another scope and see if it has the same problem.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. I tried using the windage and elevation dials and it did absolutely nothing. I feel like I'm a little lost so I think I'll just take it into the shop. The scope is used, but barely. I took it off of my Savage because I knew I would shoot the Ruger more. It is a Simmons scope, likely very low end. It hasn't suffered any serious shock that I can remember, anyway.
 
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