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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good Day
I have what I believe is a contract Model 1808 rifle but I would like another opinion.
The rifle length is 59" long
Has 3 bands
Stock is 56" long
Cal is 69
Lock Plate is 6 9/16" X 1 7/32"
Barrel length 46 3/8" end to end or 43 3/4" From barrel end to where tab extension begins.
What do you folks think?
Thanks
Kelbrit

Photos can be seen at the following link,

http://wccsptnc.com/1808.html
 

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Picture is hard to see, but looks like a 1792 Gov't Contract flintlock musket that some enterprising sole converted to percusion ignition by clamping that beak into the cock and removing the frizen.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Model 1792?
That's interesting. The book I have on old muskets only goes back to Models 1795. I'll have to dig deeper.
BTW do you have any idea what the value may be?
Thanks
 

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1792 - 1795...hey what's a couple years? - I think your research is better than my memory - as to value - as a "collector grade" piece - maybe a couple hundred bucks with the possible aim towards restoring it to flintlock config. As an example of home engineering and modification during the age of conversion from Flint and Steel to cap locks - if you can connect with someone who is interested in that era - maybe a thousand or more.
Are there any proof marks or stamping anywhere on the lock or top of barrel or butt cap?? Have you ever removed the furniture from the barrel? If so - any marks under the wood?? The picture that comes up on my computer is pretty dark and hard to see details...
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The only letters I can find is "JR" stamped on the back side of the lockplate.
On the bottom of the barrel there is a XI.
When I looked in the 7th edition of Flayderman's my lockplate and hammer look identical to a Type II 1806-1809. Flayderman's also says it's known as Model 1795/1808.
 

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Kelbrit -
Looks like you have a fine example of "FRONTIER GUNSMITHING"...most likely done during the advent of the percussion cap ignition system - 1830's or so???? It's probably unique to who ever decided to do their own conversion from flint lock. Very interesting! As I posted before - the value on something like this can only be determined by finding someone willing to spend "something" to own it. Thanks for sharing this interesting piece. Good Luck and Merry Christmas.
Jim Hauff (creds: I'm a contributing editor to the "Blue Book of Gun Values" by S. Fjestad - but that doesn't mean I know everything - it means I'm in a continuous learning mode and appreciate seeing and hearing about things like this one.)
 
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