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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From the Shooting Wire this am.

Not All Eyes On Washington
While the majority of us are looking ahead to tomorrow’s Supreme Court arguments on the District of Columbia versus Heller, not all the shooing industry is focused on the District. In fact, a goodly number of the industry’s heavier hitters are in Hartford, Connecticut this morning trying to head off the latest round of proposed legislation to mandate “microstamping” and “bullet serialization”.

Senior executives from Connecticut-based Colt Firearms, Marlin Firearms, O.F. Mossberg and Sons and Sturm, Ruger and Company are being joined by executives from Smith & Wesson, Remington Arms, ATK/Federal Cartridge, Winchester Ammunition and the National Shooting Sports Foundation are holding a press conference this morning (9:30 a.m. in Room 1A of the Legislative Office Building) to “address the ill-advised gun legislation before the Connecticut Joint Committee on the Judiciary”.

It’s legislation the manufacturers say could force firearms and ammunition manufacturers out of Connecticut. With the roll-call of industry senior execs on site this morning, even the most hardened politician might get the idea that the firearms industry isn’t bluffing.

At the center of the legislation, the new one-two technological punches of anti-gun groups.

The first, a misconception (or misrepresentation) of a new whiz-bang technology that would theoretically allow every firing pin on every firearm to be micro-engraved with the gun’s make, model and serial number. Theoretically, that information would be transferred to the cartridge casing that is discharged when the pistol is fired. Microstamping is a patented, single-sourced technology that independent studies have proven is unreliable and easily defeated by criminals (think “nail file” or “replacement parts”). It’s also estimated that more than $200 would be tacked onto the cost of every firearm.

The second: bullet serialization; the mandated laser-engraving a serial number onto every round of ammunition. Every round as in each of the more than 10 billion rounds produced each year.

Mandating that process is, the industry says, a de facto ban on ammunition wherever serialization is mandated.

The industry has also called for independent researchers and scientists to study the feasibility of bullet serialization before legislators mandated such a technology, but that hasn’t stopped the introduction of legislation in Connecticut and, most recently in New Jersey. Illinois had legislation proposing bullet serialization for all ammunition sold there, but it was rejected last Thursday by an Illinois House panel. A part of the reasoning behind the rejection was a realization that a major ammunition plant in Alton, Illinois would more than likely close down should serialization be mandated. Winchester officials had made the case that the idea of high-powered engraving lasers being used near the explosives used in ammunition was also not such a good idea.

On Friday, I called the press office for Connecticut Governor M. Jodi Rell to inquire about the administration’s position on SB 603 and SB 607. That call was made in response to a report I’d been given that said the organization Connecticut Against Gun Violence would be holding a counter-press conference this morning as well and that Governor Rell had reportedly asked state officials to speak to that group and testify in favor of the legislation.

As of press time, there was no response from Connecticut officials.

Industry officials have told me that there may be no choice but to move companies from states where they are absolutely no longer wanted – including Connecticut. It seems that many of those areas where firearms and ammunition have provided – and continue to provide- millions of dollars in tax revenues and hundreds of millions in positive economic impact seem determined to run those much-needed industries – and jobs – away.

I’m also hearing there are other states where the Economic Development Commissions are welcoming these good corporate citizens with open arms – and checkbooks, offering everything from training incentives for their citizens to tax relief in a variety of forms.

It may be time that some of the politicians with an ideological blind spot when it comes to firearms to learn that the old expression about “money walks…” may mean “money walks to where it’s welcome, leaving the (you know the word) for the politicians to explain to their out-of-work voters.”

A final note: We are in Washington, D.C. this week for the oral arguments in the District of Columbia versus Heller case. While we’re here, we will be visiting with legislators and key industry leaders to keep abreast of what’s happening. We’re also teaming with Michael Bane’s Down Range TV to help bring you the most up-to-the-minute coverage possible on this case. We’ll be giving you more information in tomorrow’s edition of The Outdoor Wire.

As always, we’ll keep you posted.
 

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Pro Gun Advocate
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10,940 Posts
So in spite of all the years of Shall Issue being successful in reducing crime (or at the very least not increasing accidents), the ideologues STILL have to take the back door to a ban.

This consumption of time and resources to fight off lies is beginning to really pi** me off.
 

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Harley Dude
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14,651 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Glock27Bill said:
So in spite of all the years of Shall Issue being successful in reducing crime (or at the very least not increasing accidents), the ideologues STILL have to take the back door to a ban.

This consumption of time and resources to fight off lies is beginning to really pi** me off.
Especially since the liberal side is using tax dollars to pay their legal bills in most cases.
 
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