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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new here and already introduced myself in the new members section. Now I have some questions.

I was going to get a Smith and Wesson M&P9 for my first gun and practice shooting at the range, however I was doing my research and saw the M&P22. My question is... Would the 22 be better than the 9 for practicing and my first gun? Has anyone had any experience with the 22? I have already shot the 9 a few times but not the 22. I know that ammo would be cheaper and the gun itself would be a little cheaper. So like I said... what are your guys' thoughts?
 

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Yep. Start with the .22 and practice, practice, practice.Ammo a lot cheaper and the M&P .22 is a fine firearm. I would check one out first to see if it fits your hand and that you are comfotable with it. Ammo is getting more expensive so if you are on a tight budget, go with .22. You can always add a 9mm later.
 

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i shoot .22's more than all other calibers combined..........they are flat plain fun and affordable. That translates into more training and improved skills.

even after the skills and basics are obtained, the 22's are so much fun that they become a "must have" in the gun collection. And keeps the basics sharp again because you are having so much fun.
 

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At the ranges that civilian can justify firing, the diff in recoil between a .22 and a 9mm mean almost nothing, so if you build real skill with the .22, then add a 9mm and practice a b it with that, most of your maintenance skill work can be done with the .22. top hands fire many 10's of thousands of rds per year, but that's cause they compete at matches that have nothing to do with realistic civilian self defense. It also better have nothing to do with shtf, cause you'd better have a fighting auto rifle for that. If it's beyond 10 yds, or beyond 5 yds for head shots, or more than 2 target to be engaged at one "string" of fire, or has you not using cover within 2 seconds of the start signal, etc, it's completely impractica and a huge waste of your time and money to practice for it. Of course, the shooting instructors don't want you to KNOW this, and neither do the gunsmiths, or gun or ammo salespeople!
 

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I'm sort of a heretic on this, but buy the centerfire first. There is nothing to be learned by an adult on a .22 that can't be learned on a 9mm. Safe handling, cleaning, maintenance, breathing control, holding, and trigger press can all be learned just as well by an adult on a big bore as it can on a .22. Only If you were 12 years old or under,would I say get the .22. Driving a Honda Civic doesn't prepare you to handle the acceleration, power and capabilities of a Ferrari or a Corvette, but after driving one of them, the Civic is a cinch. Same with guns. Happily, the difference between a 9mm and a .22 is not nearly so pronounced. Buy the .22 when you want one, but your first handgun, as an adult, should be the 9mm. Enjoy.
 

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at the ranges that civilian can justify firing, the diff in recoil between a .22 and a 9mm mean almost nothing, so if you build real skill with the .22, then add a 9mm and practice a b it with that, most of your maintenance skill work can be done with the .22. Top hands fire many 10's of thousands of rds per year, but that's cause they compete at matches that have nothing to do with realistic civilian self defense. It also better have nothing to do with shtf, cause you'd better have a fighting auto rifle for that. If it's beyond 10 yds, or beyond 5 yds for head shots, or more than 2 target to be engaged at one "string" of fire, or has you not using cover within 2 seconds of the start signal, etc, it's completely impractica and a huge waste of your time and money to practice for it. Of course, the shooting instructors don't want you to know this, and neither do the gunsmiths, or gun or ammo salespeople!
huh???:eek6:
 

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I'm sort of a heretic on this, but buy the centerfire first. There is nothing to be learned by an adult on a .22 that can't be learned on a 9mm. Safe handling, cleaning, maintenance, breathing control, holding, and trigger press can all be learned just as well by an adult on a big bore as it can on a .22. Only If you were 12 years old or under,would I say get the .22. Driving a Honda Civic doesn't prepare you to handle the acceleration, power and capabilities of a Ferrari or a Corvette, but after driving one of them, the Civic is a cinch. Same with guns. Happily, the difference between a 9mm and a .22 is not nearly so pronounced. Buy the .22 when you want one, but your first handgun, as an adult, should be the 9mm. Enjoy.
There is some good logic in your statement. I`m just a start small and work up kinda guy.:thumbsup:
 
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oh, bs, there's plenty to be learned, by a beginner, with the .22 at a savings of at least 20c a shot. you must be in the ammo biz. it takes thousands of rds to master the use of cover, hitting movers, night fire, weak hand firing, hitting while moving yourself, use of gun with flashlight, etc. So why blow $200 per 1k rds on 9mm ammo, hmm? the savings of just 2000 rds or less pays for the .22, easily. 2000 rds is nothing. i have had many 1000 rd DAYS at the range.
 

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oh, bs, there's plenty to be learned, by a beginner, with the .22 at a savings of at least 20c a shot. you must be in the ammo biz. it takes thousands of rds to master the use of cover, hitting movers, night fire, weak hand firing, hitting while moving yourself, use of gun with flashlight, etc. So why blow $200 per 1k rds on 9mm ammo, hmm? the savings of just 2000 rds or less pays for the .22, easily. 2000 rds is nothing. i have had many 1000 rd DAYS at the range.
I`m one of the posters who suggested a .22. For petes sake the man is just learning to shoot, not joining the Navy seals. You need to slow down and relax. Spouting off rounds per year, moving, nightfire, and all that other stuff you were giving out, you will drive a novice shooter into taking a knitting class. You are probaly an intelligent man but a lot of first time shooters just need some basic advice. And no, I don`t sell ammo.
 
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WHY? Because you'll just have to learn it all over again with a different gun. Besides, we're all not that interested in cover, moving targets, night fire, weak hand, running with scissors, flashlights and lasers etc. 99.9% of us enjoy our weapons, and even successfully defend ourselves (as I have), without that degreee of training.
 

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WHY? Because you'll just have to learn it all over again with a different gun. Besides, we're all not that interested in cover, moving targets, night fire, weak hand, running with scissors, flashlights and lasers etc. 99.9% of us enjoy our weapons, and even successfully defend ourselves (as I have), without that degreee of training.
Thank you.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the advice guys. I am just mainly wanting a gun that I can go to the shooting range and shoot for the hell of it, without completely breaking the bank. I do understand that guns are all different and take a little tweaking and practice, but I would still think that a 22 would help a little.
 
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