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Discussion Starter #1
In my last reloading session I was loading a batch of 223 and pressing primers. Discovered a bunch that had crimped primer pockets. Though back and remembered the brass I collected at the range. I sorted them out and beveled the primer pockets with my de-bure tool, doing 50 by hand is a pain, but I am wondering how many of you deal with crimped brass? I know there are tools for this with Dillon having the best.
 

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Crimped primers are a minor annoyance. Typically I treat any .223 range brass by first decapping and tumbling. Then I separate all the brass that has primer crimp rings and collect the stuff until I have a fair amount. When I have a hundred or more I run them through my RCBS primer pocket swage tool and then finish the case prep sizing and trimming where needed. When a stray sneaks in I have a couple of hand tools to scrape/cut the crimp ring out ( I think one is made by RCBS and the other I cannot remember, and I am not able to go look right now); this is simple with one or two, but, as you pointed out, it can get quite wearisome with a fair quantity to work on.

I also have a bit for my RCBS case prep center now that works nicely, but I have not had the need lately so as to run a batch on it.

I have heard Dillon makes a decent tool for this, but I have never used one.

I think that whatever tool/method you might choose to use, they are still a nuisance until the crimp ring is removed. That is why I set them aside until I accrue enough. I normally see them with .223 and .308 and occasionally with some .45 ACP. The .45’s are fairly rare, so I do not always catch them early on.
 

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Yes they are a pain. I have several ways to do it. hand tool which is nice if you're only doing a few here and there. RCBC prep center which works good but if you're doing a lot it will cramp your hands(at least for me) because you're trying to hold the case onto a rotating cutter. The ones with the 4 crimps are the worst. The one i have found to work the best is the RCBS de-crimp die(about $30-35). It goes in your machine like a die and there is a swage that goes in the shell holder with a collar. The only hard part is the die has a rod that goes in the case which is tight. Once you get the hang of it they go pretty fast. Put it on the rod, raise and on the down stroke you need to give it some force and the collar bumps it off the swage button. The dillion is probably the best and easiest tool but they go for about $100 so for the the RCBS works good enough to not spend the extra money on it. It just depends on how many you do at a time and how much money you want to spend.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I asked because I was given a 30 gal drum of 223/5.56 brass and I'm about to embark on a spring cleaning/sizing project. I'm going down to the shed today and pick out 500 to clean. It will be interesting to see how much off the top is crimped which will drive my decision on what to get to address it.
 

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I have a torx bit that i found that is the size of the primer pocket. I put it in a drill and ream out the crimp. If i have just a few to do. I use a hand prep tool.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I got started. Pulled out a couple of hundred and only found one that was crimped. Now on to de-cap and clean.

20200115_104438.jpg
 

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I can tell the crimped ones when im decapping. They are harder to decap. I put them in a separate container.
 

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WOW! Pretty much all of my .223 brass is range scrap with just a small amount being stuff i bought. Almost all of it has a primer crimp and rather than sorting it i just run them al through the swage. there are some that only have a light crimp and are hard to tell by eye. You can certainly feel it when you seat a primer though. It will seat them most of the time but they sort of crush in place and flatten out. Never had one go off seating and they have all went bang when firing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I actually think I'm going to buy the RBCS swage die because as both you and Coal confirmed, I noticed some extra resistance when de-capping but really could not see any crimp.
 

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Like i said, getting the case neck on the rod can be tricky at first but once you start running them through the neck just sort of ends up where it's supposed to be. Probably just a muscle memory thing from doing it. usually about 20 or so cases in it gets pretty quick.
 

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giggitygiggity please stop by the intro area and introduce yourself. :thumbsup:
 
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