National Gun Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Smarttarded
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought a Savage Axis II XP two days ago, chambered in .308 Winchester. Everything is fine.. bolt, trigger (especially the Accutrigger :wink:), and cycling is well, pretty solid for a "budget rifle". However, I noticed that sometimes the cartridge wouldn't extract, which led me to think that it had something to do with the bullet being stuck..

I checked the caliber of my gun and my ammo. Yep, both .308, but when I tested the fitting of the bullet at the muzzle, the bullet is actually wedged halfway in, there's no way that a .308 bullet can't fit inside a .308 barrel, but then again, I wouldn't know.

Is the first round supposed to expand the barrel as it travels through? or did the manufacturer mess up the barrel dimensions?

I have some photos to show my problem, keep in mind that once again, that's the maximum limit of how far the bullet can go in. I haven't fired the gun yet (thank goodness), but can someone with a lot of gun smarts tell me that this is normal, and that I won't need to take my rifle to a gunsmith, or sell it?

The ammunition I'm using is Bear Brown with lacquered steel casings.

Thanks a lot everyone!​
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,570 Posts
The bullet inserted in the muzzle of your rifle is running into the ends of the rifling "lands". This is entirely normal. Rifling land distance across from one another is less than the "groove" dimension of .308. The bullet when fired will engrave itself into the "lands" of the rifling while the bullet diameter will match the groove diameter. What you are experiencing is "normal" as it relates to fitting the bullet into the muzzle. Rifling lands may be as high as 0.004 inch above grooves, so you could have 0.008 inch "interference" total for the bullet to engrave itself into, from the chamber end, of course.

You may have ammo of "Maximum" Over All Length that when closing the bolt presses the bullet into the rifling's, which could cause a feel of being stuck when you extract the loaded cartridge. Look at the bullet jacket(s) to see if there are witness-marks from having been impressed into the rifling when you closed the bolt. It could just be the lacquering that causes the "stuck" feel.

A cartridge whose bullet is in contact with the rifling on bolt closure will exhibit pressure spiking when fired as there is no free space for the bullet to begin traveling as pressure builds. It is probably the ammo, a brand I've never heard or read of. I'd at least call and talk to a gunsmith, or buy a major name manufacturers box of ammo to test that fit.

Use your computer "search engine" and do some study to familiarize yourself with basic barrel features and characteristics.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,678 Posts
But, do not be adverse to questioning when you feel something is not right with your ammo or firearm. It is always better to err on the side of caution with guns and it's really nice to find out that everything is normal. If your particular rifle has some problems with one particular kind of ammo then try not to use that ammo.

As Mr. Popeye and Mr. Stevejet have suggested, read as much as you can find and familiarize yourself more thoroughly with firearms in general and yours in particular.

Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
This is a pretty small drawing but might help.

 
  • Like
Reactions: Stevejet

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,709 Posts
Is it just me, or are the 'Lands' and 'Groove' labels in the pic in #5 improperly reversed?
 

·
AZHerper
Joined
·
4,407 Posts
This appears to be Russian ammo which is zinc-plated steel cased and non-corrosive Berdan primed which means the cases are non-reloadable. So...there's no reason to save the cases. Just one more reason to buy higher quality (preferably made in the USA) ammo.
 

·
"You talkin to me?"
Joined
·
4,296 Posts
Is it just me, or are the 'Lands' and 'Groove' labels in the pic in #5 improperly reversed?
nope looks right,, the land is always narrower than the grooves,,, the diameter from one side of the bore to the other across the lands is what denotes the caliper

to the OP... if the bullet fits loosely in the bore it's not going to be "indented" by the rifling when fired and could "wobble" in a manner of speaking in the barrel when fired
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,570 Posts
The British .303 Enfield uses .311 to .312 inch diameter bullets which approximate groove diameter. The .303 number is the diameter as measured from the top of a land across to an opposite land. This was the British system at that time.

Most all other rifle and handgun calibers reflect the diameter of the grooves.
 

·
"You talkin to me?"
Joined
·
4,296 Posts
The British .303 Enfield uses .311 to .312 inch diameter bullets which approximate groove diameter. The .303 number is the diameter as measured from the top of a land across to an opposite land. This was the British system at that time.

Most all other rifle and handgun calibers reflect the diameter of the grooves.
you are correct,, otherwise the bullet wouldn't set into the rifling.... I typed "lands" meaning grooves,,, I sometimes get a little backasswards
 
  • Like
Reactions: Stevejet

·
"You talkin to me?"
Joined
·
4,296 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Popeye
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top