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those buggers look pretty small compared to the glocks but the ammos are huge, it must have a lot of recoil. anyone know what the weight and size of the gun? and revolvers dont leave shell casings.
 

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Is Ford or Chevy better????????? Caliber discussions have been beat to death. Use what ever you are proficient with.
 

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those buggers look pretty small compared to the glocks but the ammos are huge, it must have a lot of recoil. anyone know what the weight and size of the gun? and revolvers dont leave shell casings.
Saw a youtube vid -- 7 year old shot all 5 in a Charter .38 Special -- seems like very low recoil to me.

And to answer Coalcracker -- Chevrolet
 

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Saw a youtube vid -- 7 year old shot all 5 in a Charter .38 Special -- seems like very low recoil to me.

And to answer Coalcracker -- Chevrolet
Neighbor brought her new Charter over here and ran 50 rounds through it. Two of the factory rounds jumped crimp and locked the cylinder. Don’t be fooled by the video.

Takes a fair amount of recoil to unseat a bullet. For the record, I warned her that snubby would be snappy.
 

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.38 special can be loaded so light it sounds like a pop gun and loaded almost as hot as a .357. The load and bullet weight plays a huge role in felt recoil. .38 wadcutters will not feel the same as some 158 jacket hollow point loaded to +P. They will actually feel like two different calibers. Size and weight of the revolver is going to play a huge role in felt recoil. My Ruger SP101 has much more recoil than my Ruger Blackhawk. You're also limited to a lower round capacity.
As far as conceling a revolver is typically fatter so take that into consideration. Worrying about leaving brass sounds a bit nefarious. I only worry about it when picking up brass at the range and my back is bothering me. If any shooting you do is legal or justifiable i wouldn't worry about a few shell casings...
 

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I carry a Ruger LCR chambered in .38 Special and rated for +P loads. I keep it loaded with 158 gr semi-wadcutter hollowpoints rated as +P+. Recoil will definitely get your attention and sting your hand. Its not fun to shoot with those rounds. But since its intended for, and loaded for, serious social encounters I feel heavy recoil is a small price to pay.
 

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those buggers look pretty small compared to the glocks but the ammos are huge, it must have a lot of recoil. anyone know what the weight and size of the gun? and revolvers dont leave shell casings.
Yes a stubby is a relatively small gun. And, yes, .38 special ammo is somewhat larger than a 9mm is because it is an older cartridge designed to operate at much lower pressures that the 9mm is.
Those little revolvers are a handful when shooting full house loads like Popeye describes. Recoil is not so much a huge push as it is a violent crack that flat out stings the hand. While there are many who are proficient with these revolvers, most will readily admit these guns are designed for close personal combat/defense and are not much good typically at 25 yards. That is not to say you cannot shoot them that far, but the short sight radius and low velocity renders them far less effective at ant range past about 7 yards.
Revolvers, as you pointed out, do not cast their empty cases aside while shooting, they remain in the cylinder until manually ejected. This is a drawback of revolvers in that reloading is a bit more time consuming and complicated for the average shooter. The empties have to be ejected after the cylinder is swung open; if firing hot loads like Popeye described they may be a little stiffer to eject and thus slow the reload even more. There are speed loaders designed for dropping a fresh 5 or 6 depending on the gun, and close the cylinder you are ready to rock again. But ejecting cases and loading fresh ammo can be quite cumbersome until one has practiced, practiced a lot.
A big plus is the reliability of the revolver, while a negative is minimal rounds as compared to most semi-auto pistols. Though the cylinder makes them thicker, their shape and size lends to easy concealment via holster or pocket. Holster is best to keep the gun free of foreign objects. Another advantage a good revolver has over the Glocks you compared it too is that it is far less likely you will have a negligent discharge with a revolver.
This is far from being a complete comparison, but it is at least a start...
 

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Not leaving brass is a big plus for me as in not having to pick any up. I started reloading shortly after getting my revolvers. I used to wonder why people would choose to shoot a gun that flings your brass everywhich way.

My reloading mentor started me down the wrong path and taught me to over pressure my reloads intentionally. It made sense to me at the time. I had a SLR camera and processed my own black and white film. Push processing was a big thing back then getting 400 ISO and pushing it to 800 or even 1600 by under exposing and over developing it. Why not put extra powder and if you don't blow up do it again. Yup made sense to a kid that thought he was indestructible back then.

I became a Ruger fan hearing stories like when he experimented with hot duplex loads in a Ruger no 1 and had the brass flow and jammed the action. He sent it back and after they fixed it they told him to stick to established published loads.

I routinely loaded 8gr of Unique in a 38 case with a 158 gr SWC. It's the only load I can remember right now. I shot very hot loads to the point of exceeding reasonable safety limits but I got away with it with my Trusty 'ole Rugers. All that to say with thousands of heavy recoiling loads I never had crimp jump that I know of and never jammed my revolvers.

One of the bad habits I carried for over 40 years beside my flinch I probably got from my early excessive magnum shooting is heavier than necessary roll crimps. I'm sure it shortens brass life but I get good ignition and no crimp jumping.
 
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I've probably shot more 38 Spl than any other round. All but perhaps a box or two were reloads. Early on I learned that nothing was gained by overloading any round much less the 38 Spl.

Most of my 38 Spl shooting was done from 357 revolvers of one kind or another.

Not only is it adequate for personal protection and concealed carry but there was a time when it was the hottest thing going.

It is also extremely accurate when loaded for accuracy.

It is a round that I truly enjoy shooting.

Alan
 

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. I used to wonder why people would choose to shoot a gun that flings your brass everywhich way.
I bought a Baby Eagle a couple of years ago. I normally shoot a little and pick up brass and repeat so i don't have to pick it all up when I'm done. I shot a few mags and looked around and didn't see any brass. After a few more mags again i didn't see any and started walking farther. About 40 feet away i starting finding it. I love shooting that gun but it's like picking up after a 2 year old who got into the toy box after eating a bag of candy. Shooting revolvers, bolt guns and lever guns sure do have some benefits.
 

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My RIA 10mm throws brass 10 yards or more depending on the load. It makes a fair pile, you just gotta take a hike to go pick it up. You don’t want to be shooting at the range with someone on your right...
 

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I, had, a Beretta 40 that would flip the brass back into my face and sometimes down my shirt. I decided to let #3 son deal with that.

Alan
 

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those buggers look pretty small compared to the glocks but the ammos are huge, it must have a lot of recoil. anyone know what the weight and size of the gun? and revolvers dont leave shell casings.
I carried on duty with my department a S&W 360J for several years until they pulled it from the list recently. Besides all the heckling from some of the other younger officers, it was a great off duty carry concealed defensive firearm. I can’t say it would be my go to for a shtf or duty carry situation, but for plain clothes off duty use it was great. Down sides, slightly increased recoil due to being an air weight, sights were nonexistent so long range shots were more difficult and reloads were a bit slower. Like with everything with practice it pretty much fixes most of these issues. The recoil is just different on a revolver. Instead of pushing to the side it’s more of a direct shove back since there is no ejection involved.
 
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